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1999


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Unexpected and anticipated pain: identification of specific brain activations by correlation with reference functions derived form conditioning theory

Ploghaus, A., Clare, S., Wichmann, F., Tracey, I.

29, 29th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), October 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

1999

[BibTex]


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Lernen mit Kernen: Support-Vektor-Methoden zur Analyse hochdimensionaler Daten

Schölkopf, B., Müller, K., Smola, A.

Informatik - Forschung und Entwicklung, 14(3):154-163, September 1999 (article)

Abstract
We describe recent developments and results of statistical learning theory. In the framework of learning from examples, two factors control generalization ability: explaining the training data by a learning machine of a suitable complexity. We describe kernel algorithms in feature spaces as elegant and efficient methods of realizing such machines. Examples thereof are Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Kernel PCA (Principal Component Analysis). More important than any individual example of a kernel algorithm, however, is the insight that any algorithm that can be cast in terms of dot products can be generalized to a nonlinear setting using kernels. Finally, we illustrate the significance of kernel algorithms by briefly describing industrial and academic applications, including ones where we obtained benchmark record results.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Input space versus feature space in kernel-based methods

Schölkopf, B., Mika, S., Burges, C., Knirsch, P., Müller, K., Rätsch, G., Smola, A.

IEEE Transactions On Neural Networks, 10(5):1000-1017, September 1999 (article)

Abstract
This paper collects some ideas targeted at advancing our understanding of the feature spaces associated with support vector (SV) kernel functions. We first discuss the geometry of feature space. In particular, we review what is known about the shape of the image of input space under the feature space map, and how this influences the capacity of SV methods. Following this, we describe how the metric governing the intrinsic geometry of the mapped surface can be computed in terms of the kernel, using the example of the class of inhomogeneous polynomial kernels, which are often used in SV pattern recognition. We then discuss the connection between feature space and input space by dealing with the question of how one can, given some vector in feature space, find a preimage (exact or approximate) in input space. We describe algorithms to tackle this issue, and show their utility in two applications of kernel methods. First, we use it to reduce the computational complexity of SV decision functions; second, we combine it with the kernel PCA algorithm, thereby constructing a nonlinear statistical denoising technique which is shown to perform well on real-world data.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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p73 and p63 are homotetramers capable of weak heterotypic interactions with each other but not with p53.

Davison, T., Vagner, C., Kaghad, M., Ayed, A., Caput, D., CH, ..

Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(26):18709-18714, June 1999 (article)

Abstract
Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alterations found in human cancers. Recent identification of two human homologues of p53 has raised the prospect of functional interactions between family members via a conserved oligomerization domain. Here we report in vitro and in vivo analysis of homo- and hetero-oligomerization of p53 and its homologues, p63 and p73. The oligomerization domains of p63 and p73 can independently fold into stable homotetramers, as previously observed for p53. However, the oligomerization domain of p53 does not associate with that of either p73 or p63, even when p53 is in 15-fold excess. On the other hand, the oligomerization domains of p63 and p73 are able to weakly associate with one another in vitro. In vivo co-transfection assays of the ability of p53 and its homologues to activate reporter genes showed that a DNA-binding mutant of p53 was not able to act in a dominant negative manner over wild-type p73 or p63 but that a p73 mutant could inhibit the activity of wild-type p63. These data suggest that mutant p53 in cancer cells will not interact with endogenous or exogenous p63 or p73 via their respective oligomerization domains. It also establishes that the multiple isoforms of p63 as well as those of p73 are capable of interacting via their common oligomerization domain.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Single-class Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R., Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Dagstuhl-Seminar on Unsupervised Learning, pages: 19-20, (Editors: J. Buhmann, W. Maass, H. Ritter and N. Tishby), 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Spatial Learning and Localization in Animals: A Computational Model and Its Implications for Mobile Robots

Balakrishnan, K., Bousquet, O., Honavar, V.

Adaptive Behavior, 7(2):173-216, 1999 (article)

[BibTex]


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SVMs for Histogram Based Image Classification

Chapelle, O., Haffner, P., Vapnik, V.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, (9), 1999 (article)

Abstract
Traditional classification approaches generalize poorly on image classification tasks, because of the high dimensionality of the feature space. This paper shows that Support Vector Machines (SVM) can generalize well on difficult image classification problems where the only features are high dimensional histograms. Heavy-tailed RBF kernels of the form $K(mathbf{x},mathbf{y})=e^{-rhosum_i |x_i^a-y_i^a|^{b}}$ with $aleq 1$ and $b leq 2$ are evaluated on the classification of images extracted from the Corel Stock Photo Collection and shown to far outperform traditional polynomial or Gaussian RBF kernels. Moreover, we observed that a simple remapping of the input $x_i rightarrow x_i^a$ improves the performance of linear SVMs to such an extend that it makes them, for this problem, a valid alternative to RBF kernels.

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Pedestal effects with periodic pulse trains

Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Perception, 28, pages: S137, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
It is important to know for theoretical reasons how performance varies with stimulus contrast. But, for objects on CRT displays, retinal contrast is limited by the linear range of the display and the modulation transfer function of the eye. For example, with an 8 c/deg sinusoidal grating at 90% contrast, the contrast of the retinal image is barely 45%; more retinal contrast is required, however, to discriminate among theories of contrast discrimination (Wichmann, Henning and Ploghaus, 1998). The stimulus with the greatest contrast at any spatial-frequency component is a periodic pulse train which has 200% contrast at every harmonic. Such a waveform cannot, of course, be produced; the best we can do with our Mitsubishi display provides a contrast of 150% at an 8-c/deg fundamental thus producing a retinal image with about 75% contrast. The penalty of using this stimulus is that the 2nd harmonic of the retinal image also has high contrast (with an emmetropic eye, more than 60% of the contrast of the 8-c/deg fundamental ) and the mean luminance is not large (24.5 cd/m2 on our display). We have used standard 2-AFC experiments to measure the detectability of an 8-c/deg pulse train against the background of an identical pulse train of different contrasts. An unusually large improvement in detetectability was measured, the pedestal effect or "dipper," and the dipper was unusually broad. The implications of these results will be discussed.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Implications of the pedestal effect for models of contrast-processing and gain-control

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 62, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast processing is essential for understanding spatial vision. Pedestal contrast systematically affects slopes of functions relating 2-AFC contrast discrimination performance to pedestal contrast. The slopes provide crucial information because only full sets of data allow discrimination among contrast-processing and gain-control models. Issues surrounding Weber's law will also be discussed.

[BibTex]


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Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1997


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Comparing support vector machines with Gaussian kernels to radial basis function classifiers

Schölkopf, B., Sung, K., Burges, C., Girosi, F., Niyogi, P., Poggio, T., Vapnik, V.

IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 45(11):2758-2765, November 1997 (article)

Abstract
The support vector (SV) machine is a novel type of learning machine, based on statistical learning theory, which contains polynomial classifiers, neural networks, and radial basis function (RBF) networks as special cases. In the RBF case, the SV algorithm automatically determines centers, weights, and threshold that minimize an upper bound on the expected test error. The present study is devoted to an experimental comparison of these machines with a classical approach, where the centers are determined by X-means clustering, and the weights are computed using error backpropagation. We consider three machines, namely, a classical RBF machine, an SV machine with Gaussian kernel, and a hybrid system with the centers determined by the SV method and the weights trained by error backpropagation. Our results show that on the United States postal service database of handwritten digits, the SV machine achieves the highest recognition accuracy, followed by the hybrid system. The SV approach is thus not only theoretically well-founded but also superior in a practical application.

Web DOI [BibTex]

1997

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Masking by plaid patterns is not explained by adaptation, simple contrast gain-control or distortion products

Wichmann, F., Tollin, D.

Investigative Ophthamology and Visual Science, 38 (4), pages: S631, 1997 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Masking by plaid patterns: spatial frequency tuning and contrast dependency

Wichmann, F., Tollin, D.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 97, 1997 (poster)

Abstract
The detectability of horizontally orientated sinusoidal signals at different spatial-frequencies was measured in standard 2AFC - tasks in the presence of two-component plaid patterns of different orientation and contrast. The shape of the resulting masking surface provides insight into, and constrains models of, the underlying masking mechanisms.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

Vaziri, H., MD, .., RC, .., Davison, T., YS, .., CH, .., GG, .., Benchimol, S.

The European Molecular Biology Organization Journal, 16(19):6018-6033, 1997 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Support vector learning

Schölkopf, B.

pages: 173, Oldenbourg, München, Germany, 1997, Zugl.: Berlin, Techn. Univ., Diss., 1997 (book)

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]