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2012


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High Gamma-Power Predicts Performance in Brain-Computer Interfacing

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Schölkopf, B.

(3), Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Tübingen, February 2012 (techreport)

Abstract
Subjects operating a brain-computer interface (BCI) based on sensorimotor rhythms exhibit large variations in performance over the course of an experimental session. Here, we show that high-frequency gamma-oscillations, originating in fronto-parietal networks, predict such variations on a trial-to-trial basis. We interpret this nding as empirical support for an in uence of attentional networks on BCI-performance via modulation of the sensorimotor rhythm.

PDF [BibTex]

2012

PDF [BibTex]


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Expectation-Maximization methods for solving (PO)MDPs and optimal control problems

Toussaint, M., Storkey, A., Harmeling, S.

In Inference and Learning in Dynamic Models, (Editors: Barber, D., Cemgil, A.T. and Chiappa, S.), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, January 2012 (inbook) In press

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Active Learning Methods in Classification of Remote Sensing Images

Bruzzone, L., Persello, C., Demir, B.

In Signal and Image Processing for Remote Sensing, (Editors: CH Chen), CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, USA, January 2012 (inbook) In press

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Inferential structure determination from NMR data

Habeck, M.

In Bayesian methods in structural bioinformatics, pages: 287-312, (Editors: Hamelryck, T., Mardia, K. V. and Ferkinghoff-Borg, J.), Springer, New York, 2012 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robot Learning

Sigaud, O., Peters, J.

In Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, (Editors: Seel, N.M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Survey

Kober, J., Peters, J.

In Reinforcement Learning, 12, pages: 579-610, (Editors: Wiering, M. and Otterlo, M.), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2012 (inbook)

Abstract
As most action generation problems of autonomous robots can be phrased in terms of sequential decision problems, robotics offers a tremendously important and interesting application platform for reinforcement learning. Similarly, the real-world challenges of this domain pose a major real-world check for reinforcement learning. Hence, the interplay between both disciplines can be seen as promising as the one between physics and mathematics. Nevertheless, only a fraction of the scientists working on reinforcement learning are sufficiently tied to robotics to oversee most problems encountered in this context. Thus, we will bring the most important challenges faced by robot reinforcement learning to their attention. To achieve this goal, we will attempt to survey most work that has successfully applied reinforcement learning to behavior generation for real robots. We discuss how the presented successful approaches have been made tractable despite the complexity of the domain and will study how representations or the inclusion of prior knowledge can make a significant difference. As a result, a particular focus of our chapter lies on the choice between model-based and model-free as well as between value function-based and policy search methods. As a result, we obtain a fairly complete survey of robot reinforcement learning which should allow a general reinforcement learning researcher to understand this domain.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion MRI

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, (Editors: Westin, C. F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2012 (inbook) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1994


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View-based cognitive mapping and path planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

(7), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics Tübingen, November 1994, This technical report has also been published elsewhere (techreport)

Abstract
We present a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph. We show that this representation carries sufficient information to reconstruct the topological and directional structure of the maze. Moreover, we present a neural network that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. We use a unsupervised competitive learning rule which translates temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be perceived next, improving the view recognition performance. We provide an additional mechanism which uses the map to find paths between arbitrary points of the previously explored environment. The results are compared to findings of behavioural neuroscience.

[BibTex]

1994

[BibTex]