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2013


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Correlation of Simultaneously Acquired Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and 2-Deoxy-[18F] fluoro-2-D-glucose Positron Emission Tomography of Pulmonary Lesions in a Dedicated Whole-Body Magnetic Resonance/Positron Emission Tomography System

Schmidt, H., Brendle, C., Schraml, C., Martirosian, P., Bezrukov, I., Hetzel, J., Müller, M., Sauter, A., Claussen, C., Pfannenberg, C., Schwenzer, N.

Investigative Radiology, 48(5):247-255, May 2013 (article)

Web [BibTex]

2013

Web [BibTex]


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Replacing Causal Faithfulness with Algorithmic Independence of Conditionals

Lemeire, J., Janzing, D.

Minds and Machines, 23(2):227-249, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Independence of Conditionals (IC) has recently been proposed as a basic rule for causal structure learning. If a Bayesian network represents the causal structure, its Conditional Probability Distributions (CPDs) should be algorithmically independent. In this paper we compare IC with causal faithfulness (FF), stating that only those conditional independences that are implied by the causal Markov condition hold true. The latter is a basic postulate in common approaches to causal structure learning. The common spirit of FF and IC is to reject causal graphs for which the joint distribution looks ‘non-generic’. The difference lies in the notion of genericity: FF sometimes rejects models just because one of the CPDs is simple, for instance if the CPD describes a deterministic relation. IC does not behave in this undesirable way. It only rejects a model when there is a non-generic relation between different CPDs although each CPD looks generic when considered separately. Moreover, it detects relations between CPDs that cannot be captured by conditional independences. IC therefore helps in distinguishing causal graphs that induce the same conditional independences (i.e., they belong to the same Markov equivalence class). The usual justification for FF implicitly assumes a prior that is a probability density on the parameter space. IC can be justified by Solomonoff’s universal prior, assigning non-zero probability to those points in parameter space that have a finite description. In this way, it favours simple CPDs, and therefore respects Occam’s razor. Since Kolmogorov complexity is uncomputable, IC is not directly applicable in practice. We argue that it is nevertheless helpful, since it has already served as inspiration and justification for novel causal inference algorithms.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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What can neurons do for their brain? Communicate selectivity with bursts

Balduzzi, D., Tononi, G.

Theory in Biosciences , 132(1):27-39, Springer, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
Neurons deep in cortex interact with the environment extremely indirectly; the spikes they receive and produce are pre- and post-processed by millions of other neurons. This paper proposes two information-theoretic constraints guiding the production of spikes, that help ensure bursting activity deep in cortex relates meaningfully to events in the environment. First, neurons should emphasize selective responses with bursts. Second, neurons should propagate selective inputs by burst-firing in response to them. We show the constraints are necessary for bursts to dominate information-transfer within cortex, thereby providing a substrate allowing neurons to distribute credit amongst themselves. Finally, since synaptic plasticity degrades the ability of neurons to burst selectively, we argue that homeostatic regulation of synaptic weights is necessary, and that it is best performed offline during sleep.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Apprenticeship Learning with Few Examples

Boularias, A., Chaib-draa, B.

Neurocomputing, 104, pages: 83-96, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
We consider the problem of imitation learning when the examples, provided by an expert human, are scarce. Apprenticeship learning via inverse reinforcement learning provides an efficient tool for generalizing the examples, based on the assumption that the expert's policy maximizes a value function, which is a linear combination of state and action features. Most apprenticeship learning algorithms use only simple empirical averages of the features in the demonstrations as a statistics of the expert's policy. However, this method is efficient only when the number of examples is sufficiently large to cover most of the states, or the dynamics of the system is nearly deterministic. In this paper, we show that the quality of the learned policies is sensitive to the error in estimating the averages of the features when the dynamics of the system is stochastic. To reduce this error, we introduce two new approaches for bootstrapping the demonstrations by assuming that the expert is near-optimal and the dynamics of the system is known. In the first approach, the expert's examples are used to learn a reward function and to generate furthermore examples from the corresponding optimal policy. The second approach uses a transfer technique, known as graph homomorphism, in order to generalize the expert's actions to unvisited regions of the state space. Empirical results on simulated robot navigation problems show that our approach is able to learn sufficiently good policies from a significantly small number of examples.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Quasi-Newton Methods: A New Direction

Hennig, P., Kiefel, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 14(1):843-865, March 2013 (article)

Abstract
Four decades after their invention, quasi-Newton methods are still state of the art in unconstrained numerical optimization. Although not usually interpreted thus, these are learning algorithms that fit a local quadratic approximation to the objective function. We show that many, including the most popular, quasi-Newton methods can be interpreted as approximations of Bayesian linear regression under varying prior assumptions. This new notion elucidates some shortcomings of classical algorithms, and lights the way to a novel nonparametric quasi-Newton method, which is able to make more efficient use of available information at computational cost similar to its predecessors.

website+code pdf link (url) [BibTex]

website+code pdf link (url) [BibTex]


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Regional effects of magnetization dispersion on quantitative perfusion imaging for pulsed and continuous arterial spin labeling

Cavusoglu, M., Pohmann, R., Burger, H. C., Uludag, K.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 69(2):524-530, Febuary 2013 (article)

Abstract
Most experiments assume a global transit delay time with blood flowing from the tagging region to the imaging slice in plug flow without any dispersion of the magnetization. However, because of cardiac pulsation, nonuniform cross-sectional flow profile, and complex vessel networks, the transit delay time is not a single value but follows a distribution. In this study, we explored the regional effects of magnetization dispersion on quantitative perfusion imaging for varying transit times within a very large interval from the direct comparison of pulsed, pseudo-continuous, and dual-coil continuous arterial spin labeling encoding schemes. Longer distances between tagging and imaging region typically used for continuous tagging schemes enhance the regional bias on the quantitative cerebral blood flow measurement causing an underestimation up to 37% when plug flow is assumed as in the standard model.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The multivariate Watson distribution: Maximum-likelihood estimation and other aspects

Sra, S., Karp, D.

Journal of Multivariate Analysis, 114, pages: 256-269, February 2013 (article)

Abstract
This paper studies fundamental aspects of modelling data using multivariate Watson distributions. Although these distributions are natural for modelling axially symmetric data (i.e., unit vectors where View the MathML source are equivalent), for high-dimensions using them can be difficult—largely because for Watson distributions even basic tasks such as maximum-likelihood are numerically challenging. To tackle the numerical difficulties some approximations have been derived. But these are either grossly inaccurate in high-dimensions [K.V. Mardia, P. Jupp, Directional Statistics, second ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2000] or when reasonably accurate [A. Bijral, M. Breitenbach, G.Z. Grudic, Mixture of Watson distributions: a generative model for hyperspherical embeddings, in: Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, AISTATS 2007, 2007, pp. 35–42], they lack theoretical justification. We derive new approximations to the maximum-likelihood estimates; our approximations are theoretically well-defined, numerically accurate, and easy to compute. We build on our parameter estimation and discuss mixture-modelling with Watson distributions; here we uncover a hitherto unknown connection to the “diametrical clustering” algorithm of Dhillon et al. [I.S. Dhillon, E.M. Marcotte, U. Roshan, Diametrical clustering for identifying anticorrelated gene clusters, Bioinformatics 19 (13) (2003) 1612–1619].

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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How the result of graph clustering methods depends on the construction of the graph

Maier, M., von Luxburg, U., Hein, M.

ESAIM: Probability & Statistics, 17, pages: 370-418, January 2013 (article)

Abstract
We study the scenario of graph-based clustering algorithms such as spectral clustering. Given a set of data points, one rst has to construct a graph on the data points and then apply a graph clustering algorithm to nd a suitable partition of the graph. Our main question is if and how the construction of the graph (choice of the graph, choice of parameters, choice of weights) in uences the outcome of the nal clustering result. To this end we study the convergence of cluster quality measures such as the normalized cut or the Cheeger cut on various kinds of random geometric graphs as the sample size tends to in nity. It turns out that the limit values of the same objective function are systematically di erent on di erent types of graphs. This implies that clustering results systematically depend on the graph and can be very di erent for di erent types of graph. We provide examples to illustrate the implications on spectral clustering.

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Explicit eigenvalues of certain scaled trigonometric matrices

Sra, S.

Linear Algebra and its Applications, 438(1):173-181, January 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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How Sensitive Is the Human Visual System to the Local Statistics of Natural Images?

Gerhard, H., Wichmann, F., Bethge, M.

PLoS Computational Biology, 9(1):e1002873, January 2013 (article)

Abstract
Several aspects of primate visual physiology have been identified as adaptations to local regularities of natural images. However, much less work has measured visual sensitivity to local natural image regularities. Most previous work focuses on global perception of large images and shows that observers are more sensitive to visual information when image properties resemble those of natural images. In this work we measure human sensitivity to local natural image regularities using stimuli generated by patch-based probabilistic natural image models that have been related to primate visual physiology. We find that human observers can learn to discriminate the statistical regularities of natural image patches from those represented by current natural image models after very few exposures and that discriminability depends on the degree of regularities captured by the model. The quick learning we observed suggests that the human visual system is biased for processing natural images, even at very fine spatial scales, and that it has a surprisingly large knowledge of the regularities in natural images, at least in comparison to the state-of-the-art statistical models of natural images.

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A neural population model for visual pattern detection

Goris, R., Putzeys, T., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Psychological Review, 120(3):472–496, 2013 (article)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Accurate indel prediction using paired-end short reads

Grimm, D., Hagmann, J., Koenig, D., Weigel, D., Borgwardt, KM.

BMC Genomics, 14(132), 2013 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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When luminance increment thresholds depend on apparent lightness

Maertens, M., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 13(6):1-11, 2013 (article)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Efficient network-guided multi-locus association mapping with graph cuts

Azencott, C., Grimm, D., Sugiyama, M., Kawahara, Y., Borgwardt, K.

Bioinformatics, 29(13):i171-i179, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Counterfactual Reasoning and Learning Systems: The Example of Computational Advertising

Bottou, L., Peters, J., Quiñonero-Candela, J., Charles, D., Chickering, D., Portugualy, E., Ray, D., Simard, P., Snelson, E.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 14, pages: 3207-3260, 2013 (article)

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Quantifying causal influences

Janzing, D., Balduzzi, D., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Schölkopf, B.

Annals of Statistics, 41(5):2324-2358, 2013 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Probabilistic movement modeling for intention inference in human-robot interaction

Wang, Z., Mülling, K., Deisenroth, M., Ben Amor, H., Vogt, D., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(7):841-858, 2013 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Blind Retrospective Motion Correction of MR Images

Loktyushin, A., Nickisch, H., Pohmann, R., Schölkopf, B.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), 70(6):1608–1618, 2013 (article)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Modeling fixation locations using spatial point processes

Barthelmé, S., Trukenbrod, H., Engbert, R., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 13(12):1-34, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Whenever eye movements are measured, a central part of the analysis has to do with where subjects fixate and why they fixated where they fixated. To a first approximation, a set of fixations can be viewed as a set of points in space; this implies that fixations are spatial data and that the analysis of fixation locations can be beneficially thought of as a spatial statistics problem. We argue that thinking of fixation locations as arising from point processes is a very fruitful framework for eye-movement data, helping turn qualitative questions into quantitative ones. We provide a tutorial introduction to some of the main ideas of the field of spatial statistics, focusing especially on spatial Poisson processes. We show how point processes help relate image properties to fixation locations. In particular we show how point processes naturally express the idea that image features' predictability for fixations may vary from one image to another. We review other methods of analysis used in the literature, show how they relate to point process theory, and argue that thinking in terms of point processes substantially extends the range of analyses that can be performed and clarify their interpretation.

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts

Mechelke, M., Habeck, M.

Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, 81(6):984–993, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Climate Extremes and the Carbon Cycle

Reichstein, M., Bahn, M., Ciais, P., Frank, D., Mahecha, M., Seneviratne, S., Zscheischler, J., Beer, C., Buchmann, N., Frank, D., Papale, D., Rammig, A., Smith, P., Thonicke, K., van der Velde, M., Vicca, S., Walz, A., Wattenbach, M.

Nature, 500, pages: 287-295, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Identification of stimulus cues in narrow-band tone-in-noise detection using sparse observer models

Schönfelder, V., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 134(1):447-463, 2013 (article)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Model-based Imitation Learning

Englert, P., Paraschos, A., Peters, J., Deisenroth, M.

Adaptive Behavior Journal, 21(5):388-403, 2013 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Metabolic cost as an organizing principle for cooperative learning

Balduzzi, D., Ortega, P., Besserve, M.

Advances in Complex Systems, 16(02n03):1350012, 2013 (article)

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]

Web DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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MR-based PET Attenuation Correction for PET/MR Imaging

Bezrukov, I., Mantlik, F., Schmidt, H., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Seminars in Nuclear Medicine, 43(1):45-59, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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MR-based Attenuation Correction Methods for Improved PET Quantification in Lesions within Bone and Susceptibility Artifact Regions

Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 54(10):1768-1774, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Hybrid PET/MR systems have recently entered clinical practice. Thus, the accuracy of MR-based attenuation correction in simultaneously acquired data can now be investigated. We assessed the accuracy of 4 methods of MR-based attenuation correction in lesions within soft tissue, bone, and MR susceptibility artifacts: 2 segmentation-based methods (SEG1, provided by the manufacturer, and SEG2, a method with atlas-based susceptibility artifact correction); an atlas- and pattern recognition–based method (AT&PR), which also used artifact correction; and a new method combining AT&PR and SEG2 (SEG2wBONE). Methods: Attenuation maps were calculated for the PET/MR datasets of 10 patients acquired on a whole-body PET/MR system, allowing for simultaneous acquisition of PET and MR data. Eighty percent iso-contour volumes of interest were placed on lesions in soft tissue (n = 21), in bone (n = 20), near bone (n = 19), and within or near MR susceptibility artifacts (n = 9). Relative mean volume-of-interest differences were calculated with CT-based attenuation correction as a reference. Results: For soft-tissue lesions, none of the methods revealed a significant difference in PET standardized uptake value relative to CT-based attenuation correction (SEG1, −2.6% ± 5.8%; SEG2, −1.6% ± 4.9%; AT&PR, −4.7% ± 6.5%; SEG2wBONE, 0.2% ± 5.3%). For bone lesions, underestimation of PET standardized uptake values was found for all methods, with minimized error for the atlas-based approaches (SEG1, −16.1% ± 9.7%; SEG2, −11.0% ± 6.7%; AT&PR, −6.6% ± 5.0%; SEG2wBONE, −4.7% ± 4.4%). For lesions near bone, underestimations of lower magnitude were observed (SEG1, −12.0% ± 7.4%; SEG2, −9.2% ± 6.5%; AT&PR, −4.6% ± 7.8%; SEG2wBONE, −4.2% ± 6.2%). For lesions affected by MR susceptibility artifacts, quantification errors could be reduced using the atlas-based artifact correction (SEG1, −54.0% ± 38.4%; SEG2, −15.0% ± 12.2%; AT&PR, −4.1% ± 11.2%; SEG2wBONE, 0.6% ± 11.1%). Conclusion: For soft-tissue lesions, none of the evaluated methods showed statistically significant errors. For bone lesions, significant underestimations of −16% and −11% occurred for methods in which bone tissue was ignored (SEG1 and SEG2). In the present attenuation correction schemes, uncorrected MR susceptibility artifacts typically result in reduced attenuation values, potentially leading to highly reduced PET standardized uptake values, rendering lesions indistinguishable from background. While AT&PR and SEG2wBONE show accurate results in both soft tissue and bone, SEG2wBONE uses a two-step approach for tissue classification, which increases the robustness of prediction and can be applied retrospectively if more precision in bone areas is needed.

Web DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Learning output kernels for multi-task problems

Dinuzzo, F.

Neurocomputing, 118, pages: 119-126, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Analytical probabilistic modeling for radiation therapy treatment planning

Bangert, M., Hennig, P., Oelfke, U.

Physics in Medicine and Biology, 58(16):5401-5419, 2013 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Imaging Findings and Therapy Response Monitoring in Chronic Sclerodermatous Graft-Versus-Host Disease: Preliminary Data of a Simultaneous PET/MRI Approach

Sauter, A., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Kolb, A., Federmann, B., Pfannenberg, C., Reimold, M., Pichler, B., Bethge, W., Horger, M.

Clinical Nuclear Medicine, 38(8):e309-e317, 2013 (article)

Abstract
PURPOSE: Our objective was a multifunctional imaging approach of chronic sclerodermatous graft-versus-host disease (ScGVHD) and its course during therapy using PET/MRI. METHODS: We performed partial-body PET/CT and PET/MRI of the calf in 6 consecutively recruited patients presenting with severe ScGVHD. The patients were treated with different immunosuppressive regimens and supportive therapies. PET/CT scanning started 60.5 +/- 3.3 minutes, PET/MRI imaging 139.5 +/- 16.7 minutes after F-FDG application. MRI acquisition included T1- (precontrast and postcontrast) and T2-weighted sequences. SUVmean, T1 contrast enhancement, and T2 signal intensity from region-of-interest analysis were calculated for different fascial and muscular compartments. In addition, musculoskeletal MRI findings and the modified Rodnan skin score were assessed. All patients underwent imaging follow-up. RESULTS: At baseline PET/MRI, ScGVHD-related musculoskeletal abnormalities consisted of increased signal and/or thickening of involved anatomical structures on T2-weighted and T1 postcontrast images as well as an increased FDG uptake. At follow-up, ScGVHD-related imaging findings decreased (SUVmean n = 4, mean T1 contrast enhancement n = 5, mean T2 signal intensity n = 3) or progressed (SUVmean n = 3, mean T1 contrast enhancement n = 2, mean T2 signal intensity n = 4). Clinically modified Rodnan skin score improved for 5 follow-ups and progressed for 2. SUVmean values correlated between PET/CT and PET/MRI acquisition (r = 0.660, P = 0.014), T1 contrast enhancement, and T2 signal (r = 0.668, P = 0.012), but not between the SUVmean values and the MRI parameters. CONCLUSIONS: PET/MRI as a combined morphological and functional technique seems to assess the inflammatory processes from different points of view and provides therefore in part complementary information

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Survey on Policy Search for Robotics, Foundations and Trends in Robotics

Deisenroth, M., Neumann, G., Peters, J.

Foundations and Trends in Robotics, 2(1-2):1-142, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning in Robotics: A Review

Kober, J., Bagnell, D., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(11):1238–1274, 2013 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Multimodal information improves the rapid detection of mental fatigue

Laurent, F., Valderrama, M., Besserve, M., Guillard, M., Lachaux, J., Martinerie, J., Florence, G.

Biomedical Signal Processing and Control, 8(4):400 - 408, 2013 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Interactive Domain Adaptation for the Classification of Remote Sensing Images using Active Learning

Persello, C.

IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Letters, 10(4):736-740, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning to Select and Generalize Striking Movements in Robot Table Tennis

Mülling, K., Kober, J., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

International Journal of Robotics Research, 32(3):263-279, 2013 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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HiFiVE: A Hilbert Space Embedding of Fiber Variability Estimates for Uncertainty Modeling and Visualization

Schultz, T., Schlaffke, L., Schölkopf, B., Schmidt-Wilcke, T.

Computer Graphics Forum, 32(3):121-130, (Editors: B Preim, P Rheingans, and H Theisel), Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK, Eurographics Conference on Visualization (EuroVis), 2013 (article)

DOI Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Detection and attribution of large spatiotemporal extreme events in Earth observation data

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., Harmeling, S., Reichstein, M.

Ecological Informatics, 15, pages: 66-73, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Latest climate projections suggest that both frequency and intensity of climate extremes will be substantially modified over the course of the coming decades. As a consequence, we need to understand to what extent and via which pathways climate extremes affect the state and functionality of terrestrial ecosystems and the associated biogeochemical cycles on a global scale. So far the impacts of climate extremes on the terrestrial biosphere were mainly investigated on the basis of case studies, while global assessments are widely lacking. In order to facilitate global analysis of this kind, we present a methodological framework that firstly detects spatiotemporally contiguous extremes in Earth observations, and secondly infers the likely pathway of the preceding climate anomaly. The approach does not require long time series, is computationally fast, and easily applicable to a variety of data sets with different spatial and temporal resolutions. The key element of our analysis strategy is to directly search in the relevant observations for spatiotemporally connected components exceeding a certain percentile threshold. We also put an emphasis on characterization of extreme event distribution, and scrutinize the attribution issue. We exemplify the analysis strategy by exploring the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) from 1982 to 2011. Our results suggest that the hot spots of extremes in fAPAR lie in Northeastern Brazil, Southeastern Australia, Kenya and Tanzania. Moreover, we demonstrate that the size distribution of extremes follow a distinct power law. The attribution framework reveals that extremes in fAPAR are primarily driven by phases of water scarcity.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Simultaneous PET/MR reveals Brain Function in Activated and Resting State on Metabolic, Hemodynamic and Multiple Temporal Scales

Wehrl, H., Hossain, M., Lankes, K., Liu, C., Bezrukov, I., Martirosian, P., Schick, F., Reischl, G., Pichler, B.

Nature Medicine, 19, pages: 1184–1189, 2013 (article)

Abstract
Combined positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new tool to study functional processes in the brain. Here we study brain function in response to a barrel-field stimulus simultaneously using PET, which traces changes in glucose metabolism on a slow time scale, and functional MRI (fMRI), which assesses fast vascular and oxygenation changes during activation. We found spatial and quantitative discrepancies between the PET and the fMRI activation data. The functional connectivity of the rat brain was assessed by both modalities: the fMRI approach determined a total of nine known neural networks, whereas the PET method identified seven glucose metabolism–related networks. These results demonstrate the feasibility of combined PET-MRI for the simultaneous study of the brain at activation and rest, revealing comprehensive and complementary information to further decode brain function and brain networks.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Finding Potential Support Vectors in Separable Classification Problems

Varagnolo, D., Del Favero, S., Dinuzzo, F., Schenato, L., Pillonetto, G.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks and Learning Systems, 24(11):1799-1813, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Open-Box Spectral Clustering: Applications to Medical Image Analysis

Schultz, T., Kindlmann, G.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 19(12):2100-2108, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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im3shape: a maximum likelihood galaxy shear measurement code for cosmic gravitational lensing

Zuntz, J., Kacprzak, T., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M., Rowe, B., Bridle, S.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 434(2):1604-1618, Oxford University Press, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Accurate detection of differential RNA processing

Drewe, P., Stegle, O., Hartmann, L., Kahles, A., Bohnert, R., Wachter, A., Borgwardt, K. M., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 41(10):5189-5198, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Detecting regulatory gene–environment interactions with unmeasured environmental factors

Fusi, N., Lippert, C., Borgwardt, K. M., Lawrence, N. D., Stegle, O.

Bioinformatics, 29(11):1382-1389, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Fragmentation of Slow Wave Sleep after Onset of Complete Locked-In State

Soekadar, S. R., Born, J., Birbaumer, N., Bensch, M., Halder, S., Murguialday, A. R., Gharabaghi, A., Nijboer, F., Schölkopf, B., Martens, S.

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 9(9):951-953, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural learning

Braun, D

Scholarpedia, 8(10):12312, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Structural learning in motor control refers to a metalearning process whereby an agent extracts (abstract) invariants from its sensorimotor stream when experiencing a range of environments that share similar structure. Such invariants can then be exploited for faster generalization and learning-to-learn when experiencing novel, but related task environments.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions

Grau-Moya, J, Hez, E, Pezzulo, G, Braun, DA

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 10(87):1-11, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Decision-makers have been shown to rely on probabilistic models for perception and action. However, these models can be incorrect or partially wrong in which case the decision-maker has to cope with model uncertainty. Model uncertainty has recently also been shown to be an important determinant of sensorimotor behaviour in humans that can lead to risk-sensitive deviations from Bayes optimal behaviour towards worst-case or best-case outcomes. Here, we investigate the effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions similar to the stag-hunt game, where players develop models about the other player and decide between a pay-off-dominant cooperative solution and a risk-dominant, non-cooperative solution. In simulations, we show that players who allow for optimistic deviations from their opponent model are much more likely to converge to cooperative outcomes. We also implemented this agent model in a virtual reality environment, and let human subjects play against a virtual player. In this game, subjects' pay-offs were experienced as forces opposing their movements. During the experiment, we manipulated the risk sensitivity of the computer player and observed human responses. We found not only that humans adaptively changed their level of cooperation depending on the risk sensitivity of the computer player but also that their initial play exhibited characteristic risk-sensitive biases. Our results suggest that model uncertainty is an important determinant of cooperation in two-player sensorimotor interactions.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Thermodynamics as a theory of decision-making with information-processing costs

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 469(2153):1-18, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Perfectly rational decision-makers maximize expected utility, but crucially ignore the resource costs incurred when determining optimal actions. Here, we propose a thermodynamically inspired formalization of bounded rational decision-making where information processing is modelled as state changes in thermodynamic systems that can be quantified by differences in free energy. By optimizing a free energy, bounded rational decision-makers trade off expected utility gains and information-processing costs measured by the relative entropy. As a result, the bounded rational decision-making problem can be rephrased in terms of well-known variational principles from statistical physics. In the limit when computational costs are ignored, the maximum expected utility principle is recovered. We discuss links to existing decision-making frameworks and applications to human decision-making experiments that are at odds with expected utility theory. Since most of the mathematical machinery can be borrowed from statistical physics, the main contribution is to re-interpret the formalism of thermodynamic free-energy differences in terms of bounded rational decision-making and to discuss its relationship to human decision-making experiments.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2003


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Molecular phenotyping of human chondrocyte cell lines T/C-28a2, T/C-28a4, and C-28/I2

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Zien, A., Gebhard, P., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Arthritis & Rheumatism, 48(12):3395-3403, December 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

2003

[BibTex]


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A Study on Rainfall - Runoff Models for Improving Ensemble Streamflow Prediction: 1. Rainfallrunoff Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

Jeong, D., Kim, Y., Cho, S., Shin, H.

Journal of the Korean Society of Civil Engineers, 23(6B):521-530, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
The previous ESP (Ensemble Streamflow Prediction) studies conducted in Korea reported that the modeling error is a major source of the ESP forecast error in winter and spring (i.e. dry seasons), and thus suggested that improving the rainfall-runoff model would be critical to obtain more accurate probabilistic forecasts with ESP. This study used two types of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), such as a Single Neural Network (SNN) and an Ensemble Neural Networks (ENN), to improve the simulation capability of the rainfall-runoff model of the ESP forecasting system for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam. Applied for the first time to Korean hydrology, ENN combines the outputs of member models so that it can control the generalization error better than SNN. Because the dry and the flood season in Korea shows considerably different streamflow characteristics, this study calibrated the rainfall-runoff model separately for each season. Therefore, four rainfall-runoff models were developed according to the ANN types and the seasons. This study compared the ANN models with a conceptual rainfall-runoff model called TANK and verified that the ANN models were superior to TANK. Among the ANN models, ENN was more accurate than SNN. The ANN model performance was improved when the model was calibrated separately for the dry and the flood season. The best ANN model developed in this article will be incorporated into the ESP system to increase the forecast capability of ESP for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Quantitative Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements in the Rat Using a Beta-Probe and H215O

Weber, B., Spaeth, N., Wyss, M., Wild, D., Burger, C., Stanley, R., Buck, A.

Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 23(12):1455-1460, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
Beta-probes are a relatively new tool for tracer kinetic studies in animals. They are highly suited to evaluate new positron emission tomography tracers or measure physiologic parameters at rest and after some kind of stimulation or intervention. In many of these experiments, the knowledge of CBF is highly important. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the method of CBF measurements using a beta-probe and H215O. CBF was measured in the barrel cortex of eight rats at baseline and after acetazolamide challenge. Trigeminal nerve stimulation was additionally performed in five animals. In each category, three injections of 250 to 300 MBq H215O were performed at 10-minute intervals. Data were analyzed using a standard one-tissue compartment model (K1 = CBF, k2 = CBF/p, where p is the partition coefficient). Values for K1 were 0.35 plusminus 0.09, 0.58 plusminus 0.16, and 0.49 plusminus 0.03 mL dot min-1 dot mL-1 at rest, after acetazolamide challenge, and during trigeminal nerve stimulation, respectively. The corresponding values for k2 were 0.55 plusminus 0.12, 0.94 plusminus 0.16, and 0.85 plusminus 0.12 min-7, and for p were 0.64 plusminus 0.05, 0.61 plusminus 0.07, and 0.59 plusminus 0.06.The standard deviation of the difference between two successive experiments, a measure for the reproducibility of the method, was 10.1%, 13.0%, and 5.7% for K1, k2, and p, respectively. In summary, beta-probes in conjunction with H215O allow the reproducible quantitative measurement of CBF, although some systematic underestimation seems to occur, probably because of partial volume effects.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Blind separation of post-nonlinear mixtures using linearizing transformations and temporal decorrelation

Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Harmeling, S., Müller, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 4(7-8):1319-1338, November 2003 (article)

Abstract
We propose two methods that reduce the post-nonlinear blind source separation problem (PNL-BSS) to a linear BSS problem. The first method is based on the concept of maximal correlation: we apply the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm--a powerful technique from non-parametric statistics--to approximately invert the componentwise nonlinear functions. The second method is a Gaussianizing transformation, which is motivated by the fact that linearly mixed signals before nonlinear transformation are approximately Gaussian distributed. This heuristic, but simple and efficient procedure works as good as the ACE method. Using the framework provided by ACE, convergence can be proven. The optimal transformations obtained by ACE coincide with the sought-after inverse functions of the nonlinearities. After equalizing the nonlinearities, temporal decorrelation separation (TDSEP) allows us to recover the source signals. Numerical simulations testing "ACE-TD" and "Gauss-TD" on realistic examples are performed with excellent results.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]