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2018


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Representation of sensory uncertainty in macaque visual cortex

Goris, R., Henaff, O., Meding, K.

Computational and Systems Neuroscience (COSYNE) 2018, March 2018 (poster)

[BibTex]

2018

[BibTex]


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Generalized phase locking analysis of electrophysiology data

Safavi, S., Panagiotaropoulos, T., Kapoor, V., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

7th AREADNE Conference on Research in Encoding and Decoding of Neural Ensembles, 2018 (poster)

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]

link (url) Project Page [BibTex]


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Photorealistic Video Super Resolution

Pérez-Pellitero, E., Sajjadi, M. S. M., Hirsch, M., Schölkopf, B.

Workshop and Challenge on Perceptual Image Restoration and Manipulation (PIRM) at the 15th European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV), 2018 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Retinal image quality of the human eye across the visual field

Meding, K., Hirsch, M., Wichmann, F. A.

14th Biannual Conference of the German Society for Cognitive Science (KOGWIS 2018), 2018 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Diversity of sharp wave-ripples in the CA1 of the macaque hippocampus and their brain wide signatures

Ramirez-Villegas, J. F., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

45th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2015), October 2015 (poster)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Retrospective rigid motion correction of undersampled MRI data

Loktyushin, A., Babayeva, M., Gallichan, D., Krueger, G., Scheffler, K., Kober, T.

23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISMRM, June 2015 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Improving Quantitative Susceptibility and R2* Mapping by Applying Retrospective Motion Correction

Feng, X., Loktyushin, A., Deistung, A., Reichenbach, J. R.

23rd Annual Meeting and Exhibition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, ISMRM, June 2015 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Increasing the sensitivity of Kepler to Earth-like exoplanets

Foreman-Mackey, D., Hogg, D., Schölkopf, B., Wang, D.

Workshop: 225th American Astronomical Society Meeting 2015 , pages: 105.01D, 2015 (poster)

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Calibrating the pixel-level Kepler imaging data with a causal data-driven model

Wang, D., Foreman-Mackey, D., Hogg, D., Schölkopf, B.

Workshop: 225th American Astronomical Society Meeting 2015 , pages: 258.08, 2015 (poster)

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Assessment of tumor heterogeneity using unsupervised graph based clustering of multi-modality imaging data

Katiyar, P., Divine, M. R., Pichler, B. J., Disselhorst, J. A.

European Molecular Imaging Meeting, 2015 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Disparity estimation from a generative light field model

Köhler, R., Schölkopf, B., Hirsch, M.

IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV 2015), Workshop on Inverse Rendering, 2015, Note: This work has been presented as a poster and is not included in the workshop proceedings. (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2014


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Method and device for blind correction of optical aberrations in a digital image

Schuler, C., Hirsch, M., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

International Patent Application, No. PCT/EP2012/068868, April 2014 (patent)

[BibTex]

2014


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Dynamical source analysis of hippocampal sharp-wave ripple episodes

Ramirez-Villegas, J. F., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

Bernstein Conference, 2014 (poster)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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FID-guided retrospective motion correction based on autofocusing

Babayeva, M., Loktyushin, A., Kober, T., Granziera, C., Nickisch, H., Gruetter, R., Krueger, G.

Joint Annual Meeting ISMRM-ESMRMB, Milano, Italy, 2014 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Cluster analysis of sharp-wave ripple field potential signatures in the macaque hippocampus

Ramirez-Villegas, J. F., Logothetis, N. K., Besserve, M.

Computational and Systems Neuroscience Meeting (COSYNE), 2014 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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oxel level [18]F-FDG PET/MRI unsupervised segmentation of the tumor microenvironment

Katiyar, P., Divine, M. R., Pichler, B. J., Disselhorst, J. A.

World Molecular Imaging Conference, 2014 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1999


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Unexpected and anticipated pain: identification of specific brain activations by correlation with reference functions derived form conditioning theory

Ploghaus, A., Clare, S., Wichmann, F., Tracey, I.

29, 29th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), October 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

1999

[BibTex]


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Single-class Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R., Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Dagstuhl-Seminar on Unsupervised Learning, pages: 19-20, (Editors: J. Buhmann, W. Maass, H. Ritter and N. Tishby), 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Pedestal effects with periodic pulse trains

Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Perception, 28, pages: S137, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
It is important to know for theoretical reasons how performance varies with stimulus contrast. But, for objects on CRT displays, retinal contrast is limited by the linear range of the display and the modulation transfer function of the eye. For example, with an 8 c/deg sinusoidal grating at 90% contrast, the contrast of the retinal image is barely 45%; more retinal contrast is required, however, to discriminate among theories of contrast discrimination (Wichmann, Henning and Ploghaus, 1998). The stimulus with the greatest contrast at any spatial-frequency component is a periodic pulse train which has 200% contrast at every harmonic. Such a waveform cannot, of course, be produced; the best we can do with our Mitsubishi display provides a contrast of 150% at an 8-c/deg fundamental thus producing a retinal image with about 75% contrast. The penalty of using this stimulus is that the 2nd harmonic of the retinal image also has high contrast (with an emmetropic eye, more than 60% of the contrast of the 8-c/deg fundamental ) and the mean luminance is not large (24.5 cd/m2 on our display). We have used standard 2-AFC experiments to measure the detectability of an 8-c/deg pulse train against the background of an identical pulse train of different contrasts. An unusually large improvement in detetectability was measured, the pedestal effect or "dipper," and the dipper was unusually broad. The implications of these results will be discussed.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Implications of the pedestal effect for models of contrast-processing and gain-control

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 62, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast processing is essential for understanding spatial vision. Pedestal contrast systematically affects slopes of functions relating 2-AFC contrast discrimination performance to pedestal contrast. The slopes provide crucial information because only full sets of data allow discrimination among contrast-processing and gain-control models. Issues surrounding Weber's law will also be discussed.

[BibTex]

1995


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Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

[BibTex]