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2002


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Real-Time Statistical Learning for Oculomotor Control and Visuomotor Coordination

Vijayakumar, S., Souza, A., Peters, J., Conradt, J., Rutkowski, T., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Inoue, M., Shibata, T., Wiryo, A., Itti, L., Amari, S., Schaal, S.

(Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), December 2002 (poster)

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Sampling Techniques for Kernel Methods

Achlioptas, D., McSherry, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 14 , pages: 335-342, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose randomized techniques for speeding up Kernel Principal Component Analysis on three levels: sampling and quantization of the Gram matrix in training, randomized rounding in evaluating the kernel expansions, and random projections in evaluating the kernel itself. In all three cases, we give sharp bounds on the accuracy of the obtained approximations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Infinite Hidden Markov Model

Beal, MJ., Ghahramani, Z., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 577-584, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov models to have a countably infinite number of hidden states. By using the theory of Dirichlet processes we can implicitly integrate out the infinitely many transition parameters, leaving only three hyperparameters which can be learned from data. These three hyperparameters define a hierarchical Dirichlet process capable of capturing a rich set of transition dynamics. The three hyperparameters control the time scale of the dynamics, the sparsity of the underlying state-transition matrix, and the expected number of distinct hidden states in a finite sequence. In this framework it is also natural to allow the alphabet of emitted symbols to be infinite - consider, for example, symbols being possible words appearing in English text.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A new discriminative kernel from probabilistic models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, Jaakkola and Haussler proposed a method for constructing kernel functions from probabilistic models. Their so called \Fisher kernel" has been combined with discriminative classi ers such as SVM and applied successfully in e.g. DNA and protein analysis. Whereas the Fisher kernel (FK) is calculated from the marginal log-likelihood, we propose the TOP kernel derived from Tangent vectors Of Posterior log-odds. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework on feature extractors from probabilistic models and use it for analyzing the TOP kernel. In experiments our new discriminative TOP kernel compares favorably to the Fisher kernel.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel feature spaces and nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 761-768, (Editors: Dietterich, T. G., S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In kernel based learning the data is mapped to a kernel feature space of a dimension that corresponds to the number of training data points. In practice, however, the data forms a smaller submanifold in feature space, a fact that has been used e.g. by reduced set techniques for SVMs. We propose a new mathematical construction that permits to adapt to the intrinsic dimension and to find an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. In doing so, computations get much simpler and more important our theoretical framework allows to derive elegant kernelized blind source separation (BSS) algorithms for arbitrary invertible nonlinear mixings. Experiments demonstrate the good performance and high computational efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for the problem of nonlinear BSS.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Algorithms for Learning Function Distinguishable Regular Languages

Fernau, H., Radl, A.

In Joint IAPR International Workshop on Structural, Syntactic, and Statistical Pattern Recognition, pages: 64-73, (Editors: Caelli, T. , A. Amin, R. P.W. Duin, M. Kamel, D. de Ridder), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Joint IAPR International Workshop on Structural, Syntactic, and Statistical Pattern Recognition, August 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Function distinguishable languages were introduced as a new methodology of defining characterizable subclasses of the regular languages which are learnable from text. Here, we give details on the implementation and the analysis of the corresponding learning algorithms. We also discuss problems which might occur in practical applications.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Decision Boundary Pattern Selection for Support Vector Machines

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 33-41, Korean Data Mining Conference, May 2002 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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k-NN based Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Industrial Engineers Conference, pages: 645-651, Korean Industrial Engineers Conference, May 2002 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microarrays: How Many Do You Need?

Zien, A., Fluck, J., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In RECOMB 2002, pages: 321-330, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Sixth Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, April 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. Current knowlegde seems to suffice for the construction of models that are realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes. Such models allow to investigate the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class; the fold changes in expression; the detection sensitivity of the microarrays; and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at http://cartan.gmd.de/~zien/classsize/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular actualities. Since the situation can be assumed to be very similar for large scale proteomics and metabolomics studies, our methods and results might also apply there.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Detection and discrimination in pink noise

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

5, pages: 100, 5. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about early spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli, which are not, perhaps, particularly "natural" stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast whilst keeping the number of unknown parameters comparatively small. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on our display was measured using a high-performance digital camera (Photometrics) and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband 1-D "pink" noise made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Ideal 2002, pages: 97-103, (Editors: Yin, H. , N. Allinson, R. Freeman, J. Keane, S. Hubbard), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Third International Conference on Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated Learning, January 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
SVMs tend to take a very long time to train with a large data set. If "redundant" patterns are identified and deleted in pre-processing, the training time could be reduced significantly. We propose a k-nearest neighbors(k-NN) based pattern selection method. The method tries to select the patterns that are near the decision boundary and that are correctly labeled. The simulations over synthetic data sets showed promising results: (1) By converting a non-separable problem to a separable one, the search for an optimal error tolerance parameter became unnecessary. (2) SVM training time decreased by two orders of magnitude without any loss of accuracy. (3) The redundant SVs were substantially reduced.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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The leave-one-out kernel

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M.

In Artificial Neural Networks -- ICANN 2002, 2415, pages: 727-732, LNCS, (Editors: Dorronsoro, J. R.), Artificial Neural Networks -- ICANN, 2002 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Localized Rademacher Complexities

Bartlett, P., Bousquet, O., Mendelson, S.

In Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 44-58, Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate the behaviour of global and local Rademacher averages. We present new error bounds which are based on the local averages and indicate how data-dependent local averages can be estimated without {it a priori} knowledge of the class at hand.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Film Cooling: A Comparative Study of Different Heaterfoil Configurations for Liquid Crystals Experiments

Vogel, G., Graf, ABA., Weigand, B.

In ASME TURBO EXPO 2002, Amsterdam, GT-2002-30552, ASME TURBO EXPO, Amsterdam, 2002 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Application of Monte Carlo Methods to Psychometric Function Fitting

Wichmann, F.

Proceedings of the 33rd European Conference on Mathematical Psychology, pages: 44, 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer's performance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. Here I describe methods to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing goodness-of-fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function's parameters and other estimates derived from them. First I describe a constrained maximum-likelihood method for parameter estimation. Using Monte-Carlo simulations I demonstrate that it is important to have a fitting method that takes stimulus-independent errors (or "lapses") into account. Second, a number of goodness-of-fit tests are introduced. Because psychophysical data sets are usually rather small I advocate the use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory for goodness-of-fit assessment. Third, a parametric bootstrap is employed to estimate the variability of fitted parameters and derived quantities such as thresholds and slopes. I describe how the bootstrap bridging assumption, on which the validity of the procedure depends, can be tested without incurring too high a cost in computation time. Finally I describe how the methods can be extended to test hypotheses concerning the form and shape of several psychometric functions. Software describing the methods is available (http://www.bootstrap-software.com/psignifit/), as well as articles describing the methods in detail (Wichmann&Hill, Perception&Psychophysics, 2001a,b).

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Some Local Measures of Complexity of Convex Hulls and Generalization Bounds

Bousquet, O., Koltchinskii, V., Panchenko, D.

In Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate measures of complexity of function classes based on continuity moduli of Gaussian and Rademacher processes. For Gaussian processes, we obtain bounds on the continuity modulus on the convex hull of a function class in terms of the same quantity for the class itself. We also obtain new bounds on generalization error in terms of localized Rademacher complexities. This allows us to prove new results about generalization performance for convex hulls in terms of characteristics of the base class. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple proof of some of the known bounds on the entropy of convex hulls.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A kernel approach for learning from almost orthogonal patterns

Schölkopf, B., Weston, J., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

In Principles of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2430/2431, pages: 511-528, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: T Elomaa and H Mannila and H Toivonen), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 13th European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML) and 6th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (PKDD'2002), 2002 (inproceedings)

PostScript DOI [BibTex]

PostScript DOI [BibTex]


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Optimal linear estimation of self-motion - a real-world test of a model of fly tangential neurons

Franz, MO.

SAB 02 Workshop, Robotics as theoretical biology, 7th meeting of the International Society for Simulation of Adaptive Behaviour (SAB), (Editors: Prescott, T.; Webb, B.), 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion (see example in Fig.1). We examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor that can be moved along three translational and one rotational degree of freedom. The experiments indicate that the proposed approach yields accurate results for rotation estimates, independently of the current translation and scene layout. Translation estimates, however, turned out to be sensitive to simultaneous rotation and to the particular distance distribution of the scene. The gantry experiments confirm that the receptive field organization of the tangential neurons allows them, as an ensemble, to extract self-motion from the optic flow.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Infinite Mixtures of Gaussian Process Experts

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In (Editors: Dietterich, Thomas G.; Becker, Suzanna; Ghahramani, Zoubin), 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an extension to the Mixture of Experts (ME) model, where the individual experts are Gaussian Process (GP) regression models. Using a input-dependent adaptation of the Dirichlet Process, we implement a gating network for an infinite number of Experts. Inference in this model may be done efficiently using a Markov Chain relying on Gibbs sampling. The model allows the effective covariance function to vary with the inputs, and may handle large datasets -- thus potentially overcoming two of the biggest hurdles with GP models. Simulations show the viability of this approach.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for RNA sequence data analysis

Kin, T., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

In Genome Informatics 2002, pages: 112-122, (Editors: Lathtop, R. H.; Nakai, K.; Miyano, S.; Takagi, T.; Kanehisa, M.), Genome Informatics, 2002, (Best Paper Award) (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Luminance Artifacts on CRT Displays

Wichmann, F.

In IEEE Visualization, pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R.; Gross, M.; Joy, K. I.), IEEE Visualization, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most visualization panels today are still built around cathode-ray tubes (CRTs), certainly on personal desktops at work and at home. Whilst capable of producing pleasing images for common applications ranging from email writing to TV and DVD presentation, it is as well to note that there are a number of nonlinear transformations between input (voltage) and output (luminance) which distort the digital and/or analogue images send to a CRT. Some of them are input-independent and hence easy to fix, e.g. gamma correction, but others, such as pixel interactions, depend on the content of the input stimulus and are thus harder to compensate for. CRT-induced image distortions cause problems not only in basic vision research but also for applications where image fidelity is critical, most notably in medicine (digitization of X-ray images for diagnostic purposes) and in forms of online commerce, such as the online sale of images, where the image must be reproduced on some output device which will not have the same transfer function as the customer's CRT. I will present measurements from a number of CRTs and illustrate how some of their shortcomings may be problematic for the aforementioned applications.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2000


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A real-time model of the human knee for application in virtual orthopaedic trainer

Peters, J., Riener, R.

In Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on BioMedical Engineering (ICBME 2000), 10, pages: 1-2, 10th International Conference on BioMedical Engineering (ICBME) , December 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper a real-time capable computational model of the human knee is presented. The model describes the passive elastic joint characteristics in six degrees-of-freedom (DOF). A black-box approach was chosen, where experimental data were approximated by piecewise polynomial functions. The knee model has been applied in a the Virtual Orthopaedic Trainer, which can support training of physical knee evaluation required for diagnosis and surgical planning.

PDF Web [BibTex]

2000

PDF Web [BibTex]


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On Designing an Automated Malaysian Stemmer for the Malay Language

Tai, SY., Ong, CS., Abullah, NA.

In Fifth International Workshop on Information Retrieval with Asian Languages, pages: 207-208, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Fifth International Workshop on Information Retrieval with Asian Languages, October 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Online and interactive information retrieval systems are likely to play an increasing role in the Malay Language community. To facilitate and automate the process of matching morphological term variants, a stemmer focusing on common affix removal algorithms is proposed as part of the design of an information retrieval system for the Malay Language. Stemming is a morphological process of normalizing word tokens down to their essential roots. The proposed stemmer strips prefixes and suffixes off the word. The experiment conducted with web sites selected from the World Wide Web has exhibited substantial improvements in the number of words indexed.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Ensemble of Specialized Networks based on Input Space Partition

Shin, H., Lee, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Operations Research and Management Science Conference, pages: 33-36, Korean Operations Research and Management Science Conference, October 2000 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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DES Approach Failure Recovery of Pump-valve System

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

In Korean Society of Precision Engineering (KSPE) Conference, pages: 647-650, Annual Meeting of the Korean Society of Precision Engineering (KSPE), October 2000 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Ensemble Learning Algorithm of Specialized Networks

Shin, H., Lee, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korea Information Science Conference, pages: 308-310, Korea Information Science Conference, October 2000 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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DES Approach Failure Diagnosis of Pump-valve System

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

In Korean Society of Precision Engineering (KSPE) Conference, pages: 643-646, Annual Meeting of the Korean Society of Precision Engineering (KSPE), October 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
As many industrial systems become more complex, it becomes extremely difficult to diagnose the cause of failures. This paper presents a failure diagnosis approach based on discrete event system theory. In particular, the approach is a hybrid of event-based and state-based ones leading to a simpler failure diagnoser with supervisory control capability. The design procedure is presented along with a pump-valve system as an example.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Analysis of Gene Expression Data with Pathway Scores

Zien, A., Küffner, R., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In ISMB 2000, pages: 407-417, AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, 8th International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology, August 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new approach for the evaluation of gene expression data. The basic idea is to generate biologically possible pathways and to score them with respect to gene expression measurements. We suggest sample scoring functions for different problem specifications. The significance of the scores for the investigated pathways is assessed by comparison to a number of scores for random pathways. We show that simple scoring functions can assign statistically significant scores to biologically relevant pathways. This suggests that the combination of appropriate scoring functions with the systematic generation of pathways can be used in order to select the most interesting pathways based on gene expression measurements.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Observational Learning with Modular Networks

Shin, H., Lee, H., Cho, S.

In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS 1983), LNCS 1983, pages: 126-132, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, International Conference on Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated Learning (IDEAL), July 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Observational learning algorithm is an ensemble algorithm where each network is initially trained with a bootstrapped data set and virtual data are generated from the ensemble for training. Here we propose a modular OLA approach where the original training set is partitioned into clusters and then each network is instead trained with one of the clusters. Networks are combined with different weighting factors now that are inversely proportional to the distance from the input vector to the cluster centers. Comparison with bagging and boosting shows that the proposed approach reduces generalization error with a smaller number of networks employed.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The Infinite Gaussian Mixture Model

Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 554-560, (Editors: Solla, S.A. , T.K. Leen, K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Thirteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In a Bayesian mixture model it is not necessary a priori to limit the number of components to be finite. In this paper an infinite Gaussian mixture model is presented which neatly sidesteps the difficult problem of finding the ``right'' number of mixture components. Inference in the model is done using an efficient parameter-free Markov Chain that relies entirely on Gibbs sampling.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Generalization Abilities of Ensemble Learning Algorithms

Shin, H., Jang, M., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Brain Society Conference, pages: 129-133, Korean Brain Society Conference, June 2000 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support vector method for novelty detection

Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R., Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J., Platt, J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 582-588, (Editors: SA Solla and TK Leen and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some dataset drawn from an underlying probability distribution ¤ and you want to estimate a “simple” subset ¥ of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from ¤ lies outside of ¥ equals some a priori specified ¦ between § and ¨. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function © which is positive on ¥ and negative on the complement. The functional form of © is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. We provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabelled data.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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v-Arc: Ensemble Learning in the Presence of Outliers

Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K., Onoda, T., Mika, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 561-567, (Editors: SA Solla and TK Leen and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
AdaBoost and other ensemble methods have successfully been applied to a number of classification tasks, seemingly defying problems of overfitting. AdaBoost performs gradient descent in an error function with respect to the margin, asymptotically concentrating on the patterns which are hardest to learn. For very noisy problems, however, this can be disadvantageous. Indeed, theoretical analysis has shown that the margin distribution, as opposed to just the minimal margin, plays a crucial role in understanding this phenomenon. Loosely speaking, some outliers should be tolerated if this has the benefit of substantially increasing the margin on the remaining points. We propose a new boosting algorithm which allows for the possibility of a pre-specified fraction of points to lie in the margin area or even on the wrong side of the decision boundary.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Invariant feature extraction and classification in kernel spaces

Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 12, pages: 526-532, (Editors: SA Solla and TK Leen and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Transductive Inference for Estimating Values of Functions

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Weston, J.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 421-427, (Editors: Solla, S.A. , T.K. Leen, K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Thirteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce an algorithm for estimating the values of a function at a set of test points $x_1^*,dots,x^*_m$ given a set of training points $(x_1,y_1),dots,(x_ell,y_ell)$ without estimating (as an intermediate step) the regression function. We demonstrate that this direct (transductive) way for estimating values of the regression (or classification in pattern recognition) is more accurate than the traditional one based on two steps, first estimating the function and then calculating the values of this function at the points of interest.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The entropy regularization information criterion

Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 342-348, (Editors: SA Solla and TK Leen and K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 13th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Effective methods of capacity control via uniform convergence bounds for function expansions have been largely limited to Support Vector machines, where good bounds are obtainable by the entropy number approach. We extend these methods to systems with expansions in terms of arbitrary (parametrized) basis functions and a wide range of regularization methods covering the whole range of general linear additive models. This is achieved by a data dependent analysis of the eigenvalues of the corresponding design matrix.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Model Selection for Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, pages: 230-236, (Editors: Solla, S.A. , T.K. Leen, K-R Müller), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Thirteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), June 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
New functionals for parameter (model) selection of Support Vector Machines are introduced based on the concepts of the span of support vectors and rescaling of the feature space. It is shown that using these functionals, one can both predict the best choice of parameters of the model and the relative quality of performance for any value of parameter.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Generalization Abilities of Ensemble Learning Algorithms: OLA, Bagging, Boosting

Shin, H., Jang, M., Cho, S., Lee, B., Lim, Y.

In Proc. of the Korea Information Science Conference, pages: 226-228, Conference on Korean Information Science, April 2000 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A simple iterative approach to parameter optimization

Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In RECOMB2000, pages: 318-327, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Forth Annual Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, April 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Various bioinformatics problems require optimizing several different properties simultaneously. For example, in the protein threading problem, a linear scoring function combines the values for different properties of possible sequence-to-structure alignments into a single score to allow for unambigous optimization. In this context, an essential question is how each property should be weighted. As the native structures are known for some sequences, the implied partial ordering on optimal alignments may be used to adjust the weights. To resolve the arising interdependence of weights and computed solutions, we propose a novel approach: iterating the computation of solutions (here: threading alignments) given the weights and the estimation of optimal weights of the scoring function given these solutions via a systematic calibration method. We show that this procedure converges to structurally meaningful weights, that also lead to significantly improved performance on comprehensive test data sets as measured in different ways. The latter indicates that the performance of threading can be improved in general.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination using periodic pulse trains

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

pages: 74, 3. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2000 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast transduction is essential for understanding spatial vision. Previous research (Wichmann et al. 1998; Wichmann, 1999; Henning and Wichmann, 1999) has demonstrated the importance of high contrasts to distinguish between alternative models of contrast discrimination. However, the modulation transfer function of the eye imposes large contrast losses on stimuli, particularly for stimuli of high spatial frequency, making high retinal contrasts difficult to obtain using sinusoidal gratings. Standard 2AFC contrast discrimination experiments were conducted using periodic pulse trains as stimuli. Given our Mitsubishi display we achieve stimuli with up to 160% contrast at the fundamental frequency. The shape of the threshold versus (pedestal) contrast (TvC) curve using pulse trains shows the characteristic dipper shape, i.e. contrast discrimination is sometimes “easier” than detection. The rising part of the TvC function has the same slope as that measured for contrast discrimination using sinusoidal gratings of the same frequency as the fundamental. Periodic pulse trains offer the possibility to explore the visual system’s properties using high retinal contrasts. Thus they might prove useful in tasks other than contrast discrimination. Second, at least for high spatial frequencies (8 c/deg) it appears that contrast discrimination using sinusoids and periodic pulse trains results in virtually identical TvC functions, indicating a lack of probability summation. Further implications of these results are discussed.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Subliminale Darbietung verkehrsrelevanter Information in Kraftfahrzeugen

Staedtgen, M., Hahn, S., Franz, MO., Spitzer, M.

pages: 98, (Editors: H.H. Bülthoff, K.R. Gegenfurtner, H.A. Mallot), 3. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2000 (poster)

Abstract
Durch moderne Bildverarbeitungstechnologien ist es m{\"o}glich, in Kraftfahrzeugen bestimmte kritische Verkehrssituationen automatisch zu erkennen und den Fahrer zu warnen bzw. zu informieren. Ein Problem ist dabei die Darbietung der Ergebnisse, die den Fahrer m{\"o}glichst wenig belasten und seine Aufmerksamkeit nicht durch zus{\"a}tzliche Warnleuchten oder akustische Signale vom Verkehrsgeschehen ablenken soll. In einer Reihe von Experimenten wurde deshalb untersucht, ob subliminal dargebotene, das heißt nicht bewußt wahrgenommene, verkehrsrelevante Informationen verhaltenswirksam werden und zur Informations{\"u}bermittlung an den Fahrer genutzt werden k{\"o}nnen. In einem Experiment zur semantischen Bahnung konnte mit Hilfe einer lexikalischen Entscheidungsaufgabe gezeigt werden, daß auf den Straßenverkehr bezogene Worte schneller verarbeitet werden, wenn vorher ein damit in Zusammenhang stehendes Bild eines Verkehrsschildes subliminal pr{\"a}sentiert wurde. Auch bei parafovealer Darbietung der subliminalen Stimuli wurde eine Beschleunigung erzielt. In einer visuellen Suchaufgabe wurden in Bildern realer Verkehrssituationen Verkehrszeichen schneller entdeckt, wenn das Bild des Verkehrszeichens vorher subliminal dargeboten wurde. In beiden Experimenten betrug die Pr{\"a}sentationszeit f{\"u}r die Hinweisreize 17 ms, zus{\"a}tzlich wurde durch Vorw{\"a}rts- und R{\"u}ckw{\"a}rtsmaskierung die bewußteWahrnehmung verhindert. Diese Laboruntersuchungen zeigten, daß sich auch im Kontext des Straßenverkehrs Beschleunigungen der Informationsverarbeitung durch subliminal dargebotene Stimuli erreichen lassen. In einem dritten Experiment wurde die Darbietung eines subliminalen Hinweisreizes auf die Reaktionszeit beim Bremsen in einem realen Fahrversuch untersucht. Die Versuchspersonen (n=17) sollten so schnell wie m{\"o}glich bremsen, wenn die Bremsleuchten eines im Abstand von 12-15 m voran fahrenden Fahrzeuges aufleuchteten. In 50 von insgesamt 100 Durchg{\"a}ngen wurde ein subliminaler Stimulus (zwei rote Punkte mit einem Zentimeter Durchmesser und zehn Zentimeter Abstand) 150 ms vor Aufleuchten der Bremslichter pr{\"a}sentiert. Die Darbietung erfolgte durch ein im Auto an Stelle des Tachometers integriertes TFT-LCD Display. Im Vergleich zur Reaktion ohne subliminalen Stimulus verk{\"u}rzte sich die Reaktionszeit dadurch signifikant um 51 ms. In den beschriebenen Experimenten konnte gezeigt werden, daß die subliminale Darbietung verkehrsrelevanter Information auch in Kraftfahrzeugen verhaltenswirksam werden kann. In Zukunft k{\"o}nnte durch die Kombination der online-Bildverarbeitung im Kraftfahrzeug mit subliminaler Darbietung der Ergebnisse eine Erh{\"o}hung der Verkehrssicherheit und des Komforts erreicht werden.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Bayesian modelling of fMRI time series

, PADFR., Rasmussen, CE., Hansen, LK.

In pages: 754-760, (Editors: Sara A. Solla, Todd K. Leen and Klaus-Robert Müller), 2000 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for inferring the hidden psychological state (or neural activity) during single trial fMRI activation experiments with blocked task paradigms. Inference is based on Bayesian methodology, using a combination of analytical and a variety of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) sampling techniques. The advantage of this method is that detection of short time learning effects between repeated trials is possible since inference is based only on single trial experiments.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]