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2020


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Kernel Conditional Moment Test via Maximum Moment Restriction

Muandet, K., Jitkrittum, W., Kübler, J. M.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), August 2020 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

2020

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Online Prediction of Change Points

Agudelo-España, D., Gomez-Gonzalez, S., Bauer, S., Schölkopf, B., Peters, J.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), August 2020 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Algorithmic Recourse: from Counterfactual Explanations to Interventions

Karimi, A., Schölkopf, B., Valera, I.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), July 2020 (conference) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Model-Agnostic Counterfactual Explanations for Consequential Decisions

Karimi, A., Barthe, G., Balle, B., Valera, I.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), June 2020 (conference) Accepted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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A Continuous-time Perspective for Modeling Acceleration in Riemannian Optimization

F Alimisis, F., Orvieto, A., Becigneul, G., Lucchi, A.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), June 2020 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Conditional Density Operators

Schuster, I., Mollenhauer, M., Klus, S., Muandet, K.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, June 2020 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Kernel Mean Embedding Approach to Reducing Conservativeness in Stochastic Programming and Control

Zhu, J., Diehl, M., Schölkopf, B.

2nd Annual Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control (L4DC), June 2020 (conference) Accepted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Disentangling Factors of Variations Using Few Labels

Locatello, F., Tschannen, M., Bauer, S., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Bachem, O.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference)

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


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Mixed-curvature Variational Autoencoders

Skopek, O., Ganea, O., Becigneul, G.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Non-linear interlinkages and key objectives amongst the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals
Non-linear interlinkages and key objectives amongst the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals

Laumann, F., von Kügelgen, J., Barahona, M.

ICLR 2020 Workshop "Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning", April 2020 (conference)

arXiv PDF [BibTex]

arXiv PDF [BibTex]


From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders
From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders

Ghosh*, P., Sajjadi*, M. S. M., Vergari, A., Black, M. J., Schölkopf, B.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR) , April 2020, *equal contribution (conference) Accepted

Abstract
Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) provide a theoretically-backed framework for deep generative models. However, they often produce “blurry” images, which is linked to their training objective. Sampling in the most popular implementation, the Gaussian VAE, can be interpreted as simply injecting noise to the input of a deterministic decoder. In practice, this simply enforces a smooth latent space structure. We challenge the adoption of the full VAE framework on this specific point in favor of a simpler, deterministic one. Specifically, we investigate how substituting stochasticity with other explicit and implicit regularization schemes can lead to a meaningful latent space without having to force it to conform to an arbitrarily chosen prior. To retrieve a generative mechanism for sampling new data points, we propose to employ an efficient ex-post density estimation step that can be readily adopted both for the proposed deterministic autoencoders as well as to improve sample quality of existing VAEs. We show in a rigorous empirical study that regularized deterministic autoencoding achieves state-of-the-art sample quality on the common MNIST, CIFAR-10 and CelebA datasets.

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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On Mutual Information Maximization for Representation Learning

Tschannen, M., Djolonga, J., Rubenstein, P. K., Gelly, S., Lucic, M.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference) Accepted

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


Towards causal generative scene models via competition of experts
Towards causal generative scene models via competition of experts

von Kügelgen*, J., Ustyuzhaninov*, I., Gehler, P., Bethge, M., Schölkopf, B.

ICLR 2020 Workshop "Causal Learning for Decision Making", April 2020, *equal contribution (conference)

arXiv PDF [BibTex]

arXiv PDF [BibTex]


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More Powerful Selective Kernel Tests for Feature Selection

Lim, J. N., Yamada, M., Jitkrittum, W., Terada, Y., Matsui, S., Shimodaira, H.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 2020 (conference) To be published

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Computationally Tractable Riemannian Manifolds for Graph Embeddings

Cruceru, C., Becigneul, G., Ganea, O.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020 (conference) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Real-Robot Dataset for Assessing Transferability of Learned Dynamics Models

Agudelo-España, D., Zadaianchuk, A., Wenk, P., Garg, A., Akpo, J., Grimminger, F., Viereck, J., Naveau, M., Righetti, L., Martius, G., Krause, A., Schölkopf, B., Bauer, S., Wüthrich, M.

IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), 2020 (conference) Accepted

Project Page PDF [BibTex]

Project Page PDF [BibTex]


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Practical Accelerated Optimization on Riemannian Manifolds

F Alimisis, F., Orvieto, A., Becigneul, G., Lucchi, A.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020 (conference) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fair Decisions Despite Imperfect Predictions

Kilbertus, N., Gomez Rodriguez, M., Schölkopf, B., Muandet, K., Valera, I.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 2020 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Constant Curvature Graph Convolutional Networks

Bachmann*, G., Becigneul*, G., Ganea, O.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2020, *equal contribution (conference) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Divide-and-Conquer Monte Carlo Tree Search for goal directed planning

Parascandolo*, G., Buesing*, L., Merel, J., Hasenclever, L., Aslanides, J., Hamrick, J. B., Heess, N., Neitz, A., Weber, T.

2020, *equal contribution (conference) Submitted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]

2007


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Positional Oligomer Importance Matrices

Sonnenburg, S., Zien, A., Philips, P., Rätsch, G.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
At the heart of many important bioinformatics problems, such as gene finding and function prediction, is the classification of biological sequences, above all of DNA and proteins. In many cases, the most accurate classifiers are obtained by training SVMs with complex sequence kernels, for instance for transcription starts or splice sites. However, an often criticized downside of SVMs with complex kernels is that it is very hard for humans to understand the learned decision rules and to derive biological insights from them. To close this gap, we introduce the concept of positional oligomer importance matrices (POIMs) and develop an efficient algorithm for their computation. We demonstrate how they overcome the limitations of sequence logos, and how they can be used to find relevant motifs for different biological phenomena in a straight-forward way. Note that the concept of POIMs is not limited to interpreting SVMs, but is applicable to general k−mer based scoring systems.

Web [BibTex]

2007

Web [BibTex]


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Reaction graph kernels for discovering missing enzymes in the plant secondary metabolism

Saigo, H., Hattori, M., Tsuda, K.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Secondary metabolic pathway in plant is important for finding druggable candidate enzymes. However, there are many enzymes whose functions are still undiscovered especially in organism-specific metabolic pathways. We propose reaction graph kernels for automatically assigning the EC numbers to unknown enzymatic reactions in a metabolic network. Experiments are carried out on KEGG/REACTION database and our method successfully predicted the first three digits of the EC number with 83% accuracy.We also exhaustively predicted missing enzymatic functions in the plant secondary metabolism pathways, and evaluated our results in biochemical validity.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Machine Learning Algorithms for Polymorphism Detection

Schweikert, G., Zeller, G., Weigel, D., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An Automated Combination of Kernels for Predicting Protein Subcellular Localization

Zien, A., Ong, C.

NIPS Workshop on Machine Learning in Computational Biology, December 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Protein subcellular localization is a crucial ingredient to many important inferences about cellular processes, including prediction of protein function and protein interactions.We propose a new class of protein sequence kernels which considers all motifs including motifs with gaps. This class of kernels allows the inclusion of pairwise amino acid distances into their computation. We utilize an extension of the multiclass support vector machine (SVM)method which directly solves protein subcellular localization without resorting to the common approach of splitting the problem into several binary classification problems. To automatically search over families of possible amino acid motifs, we optimize over multiple kernels at the same time. We compare our automated approach to four other predictors on three different datasets, and show that we perform better than the current state of the art. Furthermore, our method provides some insights as to which features are most useful for determining subcellular localization, which are in agreement with biological reasoning.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Challenges in Brain-Computer Interface Development: Induction, Measurement, Decoding, Integration

Hill, NJ.

Invited keynote talk at the launch of BrainGain, the Dutch BCI research consortium, November 2007 (talk)

Abstract
I‘ll present a perspective on Brain-Computer Interface development from T{\"u}bingen. Some of the benefits promised by BCI technology lie in the near foreseeable future, and some further away. Our motivation is to make BCI technology feasible for the people who could benefit from what it has to offer soon: namely, people in the "completely locked-in" state. I‘ll mention some of the challenges of working with this user group, and explain the specific directions they have motivated us to take in developing experimental methods, algorithms, and software.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Towards compliant humanoids: an experimental assessment of suitable task space position/orientation controllers

Nakanishi, J., Mistry, M., Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In IROS 2007, 2007, pages: 2520-2527, (Editors: Grant, E. , T. C. Henderson), IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, November 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Compliant control will be a prerequisite for humanoid robotics if these robots are supposed to work safely and robustly in human and/or dynamic environments. One view of compliant control is that a robot should control a minimal number of degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) directly, i.e., those relevant DOFs for the task, and keep the remaining DOFs maximally compliant, usually in the null space of the task. This view naturally leads to task space control. However, surprisingly few implementations of task space control can be found in actual humanoid robots. This paper makes a first step towards assessing the usefulness of task space controllers for humanoids by investigating which choices of controllers are available and what inherent control characteristics they have—this treatment will concern position and orientation control, where the latter is based on a quaternion formulation. Empirical evaluations on an anthropomorphic Sarcos master arm illustrate the robustness of the different controllers as well as the eas e of implementing and tuning them. Our extensive empirical results demonstrate that simpler task space controllers, e.g., classical resolved motion rate control or resolved acceleration control can be quite advantageous in face of inevitable modeling errors in model-based control, and that well chosen formulations are easy to implement and quite robust, such that they are useful for humanoids.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Sistema avanzato per la classificazione delle aree agricole in immagini ad elevata risoluzione geometrica: applicazione al territorio del Trentino

Arnoldi, E., Bruzzone, L., Carlin, L., Pedron, L., Persello, C.

In pages: 1-6, 11. Conferenza Nazionale ASITA, November 2007 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Performance Stabilization and Improvement in Graph-based Semi-supervised Learning with Ensemble Method and Graph Sharpening

Choi, I., Shin, H.

In Korean Data Mining Society Conference, pages: 257-262, Korean Data Mining Society, Seoul, Korea, Korean Data Mining Society Conference, November 2007 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Policy Learning for Robotics

Peters, J.

14th International Conference on Neural Information Processing (ICONIP), November 2007 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Hilbert Space Representations of Probability Distributions

Gretton, A.

2nd Workshop on Machine Learning and Optimization at the ISM, October 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Many problems in unsupervised learning require the analysis of features of probability distributions. At the most fundamental level, we might wish to determine whether two distributions are the same, based on samples from each - this is known as the two-sample or homogeneity problem. We use kernel methods to address this problem, by mapping probability distributions to elements in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). Given a sufficiently rich RKHS, these representations are unique: thus comparing feature space representations allows us to compare distributions without ambiguity. Applications include testing whether cancer subtypes are distinguishable on the basis of DNA microarray data, and whether low frequency oscillations measured at an electrode in the cortex have a different distribution during a neural spike. A more difficult problem is to discover whether two random variables drawn from a joint distribution are independent. It turns out that any dependence between pairs of random variables can be encoded in a cross-covariance operator between appropriate RKHS representations of the variables, and we may test independence by looking at a norm of the operator. We demonstrate this independence test by establishing dependence between an English text and its French translation, as opposed to French text on the same topic but otherwise unrelated. Finally, we show that this operator norm is itself a difference in feature means.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Discriminative Subsequence Mining for Action Classification

Nowozin, S., BakIr, G., Tsuda, K.

In ICCV 2007, pages: 1919-1923, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 11th IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent approaches to action classification in videos have used sparse spatio-temporal words encoding local appearance around interesting movements. Most of these approaches use a histogram representation, discarding the temporal order among features. But this ordering information can contain important information about the action itself, e.g. consider the sport disciplines of hurdle race and long jump, where the global temporal order of motions (running, jumping) is important to discriminate between the two. In this work we propose to use a sequential representation which retains this temporal order. Further, we introduce Discriminative Subsequence Mining to find optimal discriminative subsequence patterns. In combination with the LPBoost classifier, this amounts to simultaneously learning a classification function and performing feature selection in the space of all possible feature sequences. The resulting classifier linearly combines a small number of interpretable decision functions, each checking for the presence of a single discriminative pattern. The classifier is benchmarked on the KTH action classification data set and outperforms the best known results in the literature.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Regression with Intervals

Kashima, H., Yamazaki, K., Saigo, H., Inokuchi, A.

International Workshop on Data-Mining and Statistical Science (DMSS2007), October 2007, JSAI Incentive Award. Talk was given by Hisashi Kashima. (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Classification for non-invasive Brain-Computer-Interfaces

Eren, S., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

In Automed 2007, pages: 65-66, VDI Verlag, Düsseldorf, Germany, Automed Workshop, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Non-invasive Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BCIs) are devices that infer the intention of human subjects from signals generated by the central nervous system and recorded outside the skull, e.g., by electroencephalography (EEG). They can be used to enable basic communication for patients who are not able to communicate by normal means, e.g., due to neuro-degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (see [Vaughan2003] for a review). One challenge in research on BCIs is minimizing the training time prior to usage of the BCI. Since EEG patterns vary across subjects, it is usually necessary to record a number of trials in which the intention of the user is known to train a classifier. This classifier is subsequently used to infer the intention of the BCI-user. In this paper, we present the application of an unsupervised classification method to a binary noninvasive BCI based on motor imagery. The result is a BCI that does not require any training, since the mapping from EEG pattern changes to the intention of the user is learned online by the BCI without any feedback. We present experimental results from six healthy subjects, three of which display classification errors below 15%. We conclude that unsupervised BCIs are a viable option, but not yet as reliable as supervised BCIs. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. In the Methods section, we first introduce the experimental paradigm. This is followed by a description of the methods used for spatial filtering, feature extraction, and unsupervised classification. We then present the experimental results, and conclude the paper with a brief discussion.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Hilbert Space Embedding for Distributions

Smola, A., Gretton, A., Song, L., Schölkopf, B.

In Algorithmic Learning Theory, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4754 , pages: 13-31, (Editors: M Hutter and RA Servedio and E Takimoto), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 18th International Conference on Algorithmic Learning Theory (ALT), October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a technique for comparing distributions without the need for density estimation as an intermediate step. Our approach relies on mapping the distributions into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. Applications of this technique can be found in two-sample tests, which are used for determining whether two sets of observations arise from the same distribution, covariate shift correction, local learning, measures of independence, and density estimation.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Cluster Identification in Nearest-Neighbor Graphs

Maier, M., Hein, M., von Luxburg, U.

In ALT 2007, pages: 196-210, (Editors: Hutter, M. , R. A. Servedio, E. Takimoto), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 18th International Conference on Algorithmic Learning Theory, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Assume we are given a sample of points from some underlying distribution which contains several distinct clusters. Our goal is to construct a neighborhood graph on the sample points such that clusters are ``identified‘‘: that is, the subgraph induced by points from the same cluster is connected, while subgraphs corresponding to different clusters are not connected to each other. We derive bounds on the probability that cluster identification is successful, and use them to predict ``optimal‘‘ values of k for the mutual and symmetric k-nearest-neighbor graphs. We point out different properties of the mutual and symmetric nearest-neighbor graphs related to the cluster identification problem.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian Estimators for Robins-Ritov’s Problem

Harmeling, S., Toussaint, M.

(EDI-INF-RR-1189), School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, October 2007 (techreport)

Abstract
Bayesian or likelihood-based approaches to data analysis became very popular in the field of Machine Learning. However, there exist theoretical results which question the general applicability of such approaches; among those a result by Robins and Ritov which introduce a specific example for which they prove that a likelihood-based estimator will fail (i.e. it does for certain cases not converge to a true parameter estimate, even given infinite data). In this paper we consider various approaches to formulate likelihood-based estimators in this example, basically by considering various extensions of the presumed generative model of the data. We can derive estimators which are very similar to the classical Horvitz-Thompson and which also account for a priori knowledge of an observation probability function.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machine Learning for Interdependent and Structured Output Spaces

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Tsochantaridis, I.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 85-104, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: Bakir, G. H. , T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V. N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Inducing Metric Violations in Human Similarity Judgements

Laub, J., Macke, J., Müller, K., Wichmann, F.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 777-784, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Attempting to model human categorization and similarity judgements is both a very interesting but also an exceedingly difficult challenge. Some of the difficulty arises because of conflicting evidence whether human categorization and similarity judgements should or should not be modelled as to operate on a mental representation that is essentially metric. Intuitively, this has a strong appeal as it would allow (dis)similarity to be represented geometrically as distance in some internal space. Here we show how a single stimulus, carefully constructed in a psychophysical experiment, introduces l2 violations in what used to be an internal similarity space that could be adequately modelled as Euclidean. We term this one influential data point a conflictual judgement. We present an algorithm of how to analyse such data and how to identify the crucial point. Thus there may not be a strict dichotomy between either a metric or a non-metric internal space but rather degrees to which potentially large subsets of stimuli are represented metrically with a small subset causing a global violation of metricity.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Cross-Validation Optimization for Large Scale Hierarchical Classification Kernel Methods

Seeger, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1233-1240, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a highly efficient framework for kernel multi-class models with a large and structured set of classes. Kernel parameters are learned automatically by maximizing the cross-validation log likelihood, and predictive probabilities are estimated. We demonstrate our approach on large scale text classification tasks with hierarchical class structure, achieving state-of-the-art results in an order of magnitude less time than previous work.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Local Learning Approach for Clustering

Wu, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1529-1536, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a local learning approach for clustering. The basic idea is that a good clustering result should have the property that the cluster label of each data point can be well predicted based on its neighboring data and their cluster labels, using current supervised learning methods. An optimization problem is formulated such that its solution has the above property. Relaxation and eigen-decomposition are applied to solve this optimization problem. We also briefly investigate the parameter selection issue and provide a simple parameter selection method for the proposed algorithm. Experimental results are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Brisk Kernel ICA

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 225-250, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Recent approaches to independent component analysis have used kernel independence measures to obtain very good performance in ICA, particularly in areas where classical methods experience difficulty (for instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). In this chapter, we compare two efficient extensions of these methods for large-scale problems: random subsampling of entries in the Gram matrices used in defining the independence measures, and incomplete Cholesky decomposition of these matrices. We derive closed-form, efficiently computable approximations for the gradients of these measures, and compare their performance on ICA using both artificial and music data. We show that kernel ICA can scale up to much larger problems than yet attempted, and that incomplete Cholesky decomposition performs better than random sampling.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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MR-Based PET Attenuation Correction: Method and Validation

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Joint Molecular Imaging Conference, September 2007 (talk)

Abstract
PET/MR combines the high soft tissue contrast of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and the functional information of Positron Emission Tomography (PET). For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Usually in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating source, or from the CT scan in case of combined PET/CT. In the case of a PET/MR scanner, there is insufficient space for the rotating source and ideally one would want to calculate the attenuation map from the MR image instead. Since MR images provide information about proton density of the different tissue types, it is not trivial to use this data for PET attenuation correction. We present a method for predicting the PET attenuation map from a given the MR image, using a combination of atlas-registration and recognition of local patterns. Using "leave one out cross validation" we show on a database of 16 MR-CT image pairs that our method reliably allows estimating the CT image from the MR image. Subsequently, as in PET/CT, the PET attenuation map can be predicted from the CT image. On an additional dataset of MR/CT/PET triplets we quantitatively validate that our approach allows PET quantification with an error that is smaller than what would be clinically significant. We demonstrate our approach on T1-weighted human brain scans. However, the presented methods are more general and current research focuses on applying the established methods to human whole body PET/MRI applications.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Branch and Bound for Semi-Supervised Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Sindhwani, V., Keerthi, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 217-224, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Semi-supervised SVMs (S3VMs) attempt to learn low-density separators by maximizing the margin over labeled and unlabeled examples. The associated optimization problem is non-convex. To examine the full potential of S3VMs modulo local minima problems in current implementations, we apply branch and bound techniques for obtaining exact, globally optimal solutions. Empirical evidence suggests that the globally optimal solution can return excellent generalization performance in situations where other implementations fail completely. While our current implementation is only applicable to small datasets, we discuss variants that can potentially lead to practically useful algorithms.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Kernel Method for the Two-Sample-Problem

Gretton, A., Borgwardt, K., Rasch, M., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 513-520, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose two statistical tests to determine if two samples are from different distributions. Our test statistic is in both cases the distance between the means of the two samples mapped into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). The first test is based on a large deviation bound for the test statistic, while the second is based on the asymptotic distribution of this statistic. The test statistic can be computed in $O(m^2)$ time. We apply our approach to a variety of problems, including attribute matching for databases using the Hungarian marriage method, where our test performs strongly. We also demonstrate excellent performance when comparing distributions over graphs, for which no alternative tests currently exist.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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An Efficient Method for Gradient-Based Adaptation of Hyperparameters in SVM Models

Keerthi, S., Sindhwani, V., Chapelle, O.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 673-680, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the task of tuning hyperparameters in SVM models based on minimizing a smooth performance validation function, e.g., smoothed k-fold cross-validation error, using non-linear optimization techniques. The key computation in this approach is that of the gradient of the validation function with respect to hyperparameters. We show that for large-scale problems involving a wide choice of kernel-based models and validation functions, this computation can be very efficiently done; often within just a fraction of the training time. Empirical results show that a near-optimal set of hyperparameters can be identified by our approach with very few training rounds and gradient computations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning Dense 3D Correspondence

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B., Blanz, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1313-1320, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Establishing correspondence between distinct objects is an important and nontrivial task: correctness of the correspondence hinges on properties which are difficult to capture in an a priori criterion. While previous work has used a priori criteria which in some cases led to very good results, the present paper explores whether it is possible to learn a combination of features that, for a given training set of aligned human heads, characterizes the notion of correct correspondence. By optimizing this criterion, we are then able to compute correspondence and morphs for novel heads.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Optimal Dominant Motion Estimation using Adaptive Search of Transformation Space

Ulges, A., Lampert, CH., Keysers, D., Breuel, TM.

In DAGM 2007, pages: 204-215, (Editors: Hamprecht, F. A., C. Schnörr, B. Jähne), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 29th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition, September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The extraction of a parametric global motion from a motion field is a task with several applications in video processing. We present two probabilistic formulations of the problem and carry out optimization using the RAST algorithm, a geometric matching method novel to motion estimation in video. RAST uses an exhaustive and adaptive search of transformation space and thus gives -- in contrast to local sampling optimization techniques used in the past -- a globally optimal solution. Among other applications, our framework can thus be used as a source of ground truth for benchmarking motion estimation algorithms. Our main contributions are: first, the novel combination of a state-of- the-art MAP criterion for dominant motion estimation with a search procedure that guarantees global optimality. Second, experimental re- sults that illustrate the superior performance of our approach on synthetic flow fields as well as real-world video streams. Third, a significant speedup of the search achieved by extending the mod el with an additional smoothness prior.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 29-50, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007, This is a slightly updated version of the Neural Computation paper (inbook)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and that there is no reason to ignore this possibility. On the contrary, from the primal point of view new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]