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2003


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Molecular phenotyping of human chondrocyte cell lines T/C-28a2, T/C-28a4, and C-28/I2

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Zien, A., Gebhard, P., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Arthritis & Rheumatism, 48(12):3395-3403, December 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

2003

[BibTex]


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A Study on Rainfall - Runoff Models for Improving Ensemble Streamflow Prediction: 1. Rainfallrunoff Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

Jeong, D., Kim, Y., Cho, S., Shin, H.

Journal of the Korean Society of Civil Engineers, 23(6B):521-530, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
The previous ESP (Ensemble Streamflow Prediction) studies conducted in Korea reported that the modeling error is a major source of the ESP forecast error in winter and spring (i.e. dry seasons), and thus suggested that improving the rainfall-runoff model would be critical to obtain more accurate probabilistic forecasts with ESP. This study used two types of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), such as a Single Neural Network (SNN) and an Ensemble Neural Networks (ENN), to improve the simulation capability of the rainfall-runoff model of the ESP forecasting system for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam. Applied for the first time to Korean hydrology, ENN combines the outputs of member models so that it can control the generalization error better than SNN. Because the dry and the flood season in Korea shows considerably different streamflow characteristics, this study calibrated the rainfall-runoff model separately for each season. Therefore, four rainfall-runoff models were developed according to the ANN types and the seasons. This study compared the ANN models with a conceptual rainfall-runoff model called TANK and verified that the ANN models were superior to TANK. Among the ANN models, ENN was more accurate than SNN. The ANN model performance was improved when the model was calibrated separately for the dry and the flood season. The best ANN model developed in this article will be incorporated into the ESP system to increase the forecast capability of ESP for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Quantitative Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements in the Rat Using a Beta-Probe and H215O

Weber, B., Spaeth, N., Wyss, M., Wild, D., Burger, C., Stanley, R., Buck, A.

Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 23(12):1455-1460, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
Beta-probes are a relatively new tool for tracer kinetic studies in animals. They are highly suited to evaluate new positron emission tomography tracers or measure physiologic parameters at rest and after some kind of stimulation or intervention. In many of these experiments, the knowledge of CBF is highly important. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the method of CBF measurements using a beta-probe and H215O. CBF was measured in the barrel cortex of eight rats at baseline and after acetazolamide challenge. Trigeminal nerve stimulation was additionally performed in five animals. In each category, three injections of 250 to 300 MBq H215O were performed at 10-minute intervals. Data were analyzed using a standard one-tissue compartment model (K1 = CBF, k2 = CBF/p, where p is the partition coefficient). Values for K1 were 0.35 plusminus 0.09, 0.58 plusminus 0.16, and 0.49 plusminus 0.03 mL dot min-1 dot mL-1 at rest, after acetazolamide challenge, and during trigeminal nerve stimulation, respectively. The corresponding values for k2 were 0.55 plusminus 0.12, 0.94 plusminus 0.16, and 0.85 plusminus 0.12 min-7, and for p were 0.64 plusminus 0.05, 0.61 plusminus 0.07, and 0.59 plusminus 0.06.The standard deviation of the difference between two successive experiments, a measure for the reproducibility of the method, was 10.1%, 13.0%, and 5.7% for K1, k2, and p, respectively. In summary, beta-probes in conjunction with H215O allow the reproducible quantitative measurement of CBF, although some systematic underestimation seems to occur, probably because of partial volume effects.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Blind separation of post-nonlinear mixtures using linearizing transformations and temporal decorrelation

Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Harmeling, S., Müller, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 4(7-8):1319-1338, November 2003 (article)

Abstract
We propose two methods that reduce the post-nonlinear blind source separation problem (PNL-BSS) to a linear BSS problem. The first method is based on the concept of maximal correlation: we apply the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm--a powerful technique from non-parametric statistics--to approximately invert the componentwise nonlinear functions. The second method is a Gaussianizing transformation, which is motivated by the fact that linearly mixed signals before nonlinear transformation are approximately Gaussian distributed. This heuristic, but simple and efficient procedure works as good as the ACE method. Using the framework provided by ACE, convergence can be proven. The optimal transformations obtained by ACE coincide with the sought-after inverse functions of the nonlinearities. After equalizing the nonlinearities, temporal decorrelation separation (TDSEP) allows us to recover the source signals. Numerical simulations testing "ACE-TD" and "Gauss-TD" on realistic examples are performed with excellent results.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Correlated stage- and subfield-associated hippocampal gene expression patterns in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

Becker, A., Chen, J., Zien, A., Sochivko, D., Normann, S., Schramm, J., Elger, C., Wiestler, O., Blumcke, I.

European Journal of Neuroscience, 18(10):2792-2802, November 2003 (article)

Abstract
Epileptic activity evokes profound alterations of hippocampal organization and function. Genomic responses may reflect immediate consequences of excitatory stimulation as well as sustained molecular processes related to neuronal plasticity and structural remodeling. Using oligonucleotide microarrays with 8799 sequences, we determined subregional gene expression profiles in rats subjected to pilocarpine-induced epilepsy (U34A arrays, Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA; P < 0.05, twofold change, n = 3 per stage). Patterns of gene expression corresponded to distinct stages of epilepsy development. The highest number of differentially expressed genes (dentate gyrus, approx. 400 genes and CA1, approx. 700 genes) was observed 3 days after status epilepticus. The majority of up-regulated genes was associated with mechanisms of cellular stress and injury - 14 days after status epilepticus, numerous transcription factors and genes linked to cytoskeletal and synaptic reorganization were differentially expressed and, in the stage of chronic spontaneous seizures, distinct changes were observed in the transcription of genes involved in various neurotransmission pathways and between animals with low vs. high seizure frequency. A number of genes (n = 18) differentially expressed during the chronic epileptic stage showed corresponding expression patterns in hippocampal subfields of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 5 temporal lobe epilepsy patients; U133A microarrays, Affymetrix; covering 22284 human sequences). These data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis and seizure-associated cellular and structural remodeling of the hippocampus.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Concentration Inequalities for Sub-Additive Functions Using the Entropy Method

Bousquet, O.

Stochastic Inequalities and Applications, 56, pages: 213-247, Progress in Probability, (Editors: Giné, E., C. Houdré and D. Nualart), November 2003 (article)

Abstract
We obtain exponential concentration inequalities for sub-additive functions of independent random variables under weak conditions on the increments of those functions, like the existence of exponential moments for these increments. As a consequence of these general inequalities, we obtain refinements of Talagrand's inequality for empirical processes and new bounds for randomized empirical processes. These results are obtained by further developing the entropy method introduced by Ledoux.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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YKL-39 (chitinase 3-like protein 2), but not YKL-40 (chitinase 3-like protein 1), is up regulated in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

Knorr, T., Obermayr, F., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Aigner, T.

Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, 62(10):995-998, October 2003 (article)

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate quantitatively the mRNA expression levels of YKL-40, an established marker of rheumatoid and osteoarthritic cartilage degeneration in synovial fluid and serum, and a closely related molecule YKL-39, in articular chondrocytes. METHODS: cDNA array and online quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to measure mRNA expression levels of YKL-39 and YKL-40 in chondrocytes in normal, early degenerative, and late stage osteoarthritic cartilage samples. RESULTS: Expression analysis showed high levels of both proteins in normal articular chondrocytes, with lower levels of YKL-39 than YKL-40. Whereas YKL-40 was significantly down regulated in late stage osteoarthritic chondrocytes, YKL-39 was significantly up regulated. In vitro both YKLs were down regulated by interleukin 1beta. CONCLUSIONS: The up regulation of YKL-39 in osteoarthritic cartilage suggests that YKL-39 may be a more accurate marker of chondrocyte activation than YKL-40, although it has yet to be established as a suitable marker in synovial fluid and serum. The decreased expression of YKL-40 by osteoarthritic chondrocytes is surprising as increased levels have been reported in rheumatoid and osteoarthritic synovial fluid, where it may derive from activated synovial cells or osteophytic tissue or by increased matrix destruction in the osteoarthritic joint. YKL-39 and YKL-40 are potentially interesting marker molecules for arthritic joint disease because they are abundantly expressed by both normal and osteoarthritic chondrocytes.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Statistical Learning Theory, Capacity and Complexity

Schölkopf, B.

Complexity, 8(4):87-94, July 2003 (article)

Abstract
We give an exposition of the ideas of statistical learning theory, followed by a discussion of how a reinterpretation of the insights of learning theory could potentially also benefit our understanding of a certain notion of complexity.

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Dealing with large Diagonals in Kernel Matrices

Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):391-408, June 2003 (article)

Abstract
In kernel methods, all the information about the training data is contained in the Gram matrix. If this matrix has large diagonal values, which arises for many types of kernels, then kernel methods do not perform well: We propose and test several methods for dealing with this problem by reducing the dynamic range of the matrix while preserving the positive definiteness of the Hessian of the quadratic programming problem that one has to solve when training a Support Vector Machine, which is a common kernel approach for pattern recognition.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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The em Algorithm for Kernel Matrix Completion with Auxiliary Data

Tsuda, K., Akaho, S., Asai, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 4, pages: 67-81, May 2003 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Constructing Descriptive and Discriminative Non-linear Features: Rayleigh Coefficients in Kernel Feature Spaces

Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 25(5):623-628, May 2003 (article)

Abstract
We incorporate prior knowledge to construct nonlinear algorithms for invariant feature extraction and discrimination. Employing a unified framework in terms of a nonlinearized variant of the Rayleigh coefficient, we propose nonlinear generalizations of Fisher‘s discriminant and oriented PCA using support vector kernel functions. Extensive simulations show the utility of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel-based nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 15(5):1089-1124, May 2003 (article)

Abstract
We propose kTDSEP, a kernel-based algorithm for nonlinear blind source separation (BSS). It combines complementary research fields: kernel feature spaces and BSS using temporal information. This yields an efficient algorithm for nonlinear BSS with invertible nonlinearity. Key assumptions are that the kernel feature space is chosen rich enough to approximate the nonlinearity and that signals of interest contain temporal information. Both assumptions are fulfilled for a wide set of real-world applications. The algorithm works as follows: First, the data are (implicitly) mapped to a high (possibly infinite)—dimensional kernel feature space. In practice, however, the data form a smaller submanifold in feature space—even smaller than the number of training data points—a fact that has already been used by, for example, reduced set techniques for support vector machines. We propose to adapt to this effective dimension as a preprocessing step and to construct an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. The latter dimension-reduction step is essential for making the subsequent application of BSS methods computationally and numerically tractable. In the reduced space, we use a BSS algorithm that is based on second-order temporal decorrelation. Finally, we propose a selection procedure to obtain the original sources from the extracted nonlinear components automatically. Experiments demonstrate the excellent performance and efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for several problems of nonlinear BSS and for more than two sources.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Tractable Inference for Probabilistic Data Models

Csato, L., Opper, M., Winther, O.

Complexity, 8(4):64-68, April 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present an approximation technique for probabilistic data models with a large number of hidden variables, based on ideas from statistical physics. We give examples for two nontrivial applications. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PDF GZIP Web [BibTex]

PDF GZIP Web [BibTex]


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Feature selection and transduction for prediction of molecular bioactivity for drug design

Weston, J., Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B.

Bioinformatics, 19(6):764-771, April 2003 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: In drug discovery a key task is to identify characteristics that separate active (binding) compounds from inactive (non-binding) ones. An automated prediction system can help reduce resources necessary to carry out this task. Results: Two methods for prediction of molecular bioactivity for drug design are introduced and shown to perform well in a data set previously studied as part of the KDD (Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining) Cup 2001. The data is characterized by very few positive examples, a very large number of features (describing three-dimensional properties of the molecules) and rather different distributions between training and test data. Two techniques are introduced specifically to tackle these problems: a feature selection method for unbalanced data and a classifier which adapts to the distribution of the the unlabeled test data (a so-called transductive method). We show both techniques improve identification performance and in conjunction provide an improvement over using only one of the techniques. Our results suggest the importance of taking into account the characteristics in this data which may also be relevant in other problems of a similar type.

Web [BibTex]


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Use of the Zero-Norm with Linear Models and Kernel Methods

Weston, J., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Tipping, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3, pages: 1439-1461, March 2003 (article)

Abstract
We explore the use of the so-called zero-norm of the parameters of linear models in learning. Minimization of such a quantity has many uses in a machine learning context: for variable or feature selection, minimizing training error and ensuring sparsity in solutions. We derive a simple but practical method for achieving these goals and discuss its relationship to existing techniques of minimizing the zero-norm. The method boils down to implementing a simple modification of vanilla SVM, namely via an iterative multiplicative rescaling of the training data. Applications we investigate which aid our discussion include variable and feature selection on biological microarray data, and multicategory classification.

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Variable and Feature Selection.

Guyon, I., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning, 3, pages: 1157-1182, 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Dynamics of a rigid body in a Stokes fluid

Gonzalez, O., Graf, ABA., Maddocks, JH.

Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2003 (article) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A novel transient heater-foil technique for liquid crystal experiments on film cooled surfaces

Vogel, G., Graf, ABA., von Wolfersdorf, J., Weigand, B.

ASME Journal of Turbomachinery, 125, pages: 529-537, 2003 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Microarrays: How Many Do You Need?

Zien, A., Fluck, J., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Journal of Computational Biology, 10(3-4):653-667, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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New Approaches to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):371-389, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present new tools from probability theory that can be applied to the analysis of learning algorithms. These tools allow to derive new bounds on the generalization performance of learning algorithms and to propose alternative measures of the complexity of the learning task, which in turn can be used to derive new learning algorithms.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Gene expression in chondrocytes assessed with use of microarrays

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Hanisch, D., Zimmer, R.

Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 85(Suppl 2):117-123, 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1998


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Book Review: An Introduction to Fuzzy Logic for Practical Applications

Peters, J.

K{\"u}nstliche Intelligenz (KI), 98(4):60-60, November 1998 (article)

[BibTex]

1998

[BibTex]


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Where did I take that snapshot? Scene-based homing by image matching

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

Biological Cybernetics, 79(3):191-202, October 1998 (article)

Abstract
In homing tasks, the goal is often not marked by visible objects but must be inferred from the spatial relation to the visual cues in the surrounding scene. The exact computation of the goal direction would require knowledge about the distances to visible landmarks, information, which is not directly available to passive vision systems. However, if prior assumptions about typical distance distributions are used, a snapshot taken at the goal suffices to compute the goal direction from the current view. We show that most existing approaches to scene-based homing implicitly assume an isotropic landmark distribution. As an alternative, we propose a homing scheme that uses parameterized displacement fields. These are obtained from an approximation that incorporates prior knowledge about perspective distortions of the visual environment. A mathematical analysis proves that both approximations do not prevent the schemes from approaching the goal with arbitrary accuracy, but lead to different errors in the computed goal direction. Mobile robot experiments are used to test the theoretical predictions and to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the new approach.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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On a Kernel-Based Method for Pattern Recognition, Regression, Approximation, and Operator Inversion

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

Algorithmica, 22(1-2):211-231, September 1998 (article)

Abstract
We present a kernel-based framework for pattern recognition, regression estimation, function approximation, and multiple operator inversion. Adopting a regularization-theoretic framework, the above are formulated as constrained optimization problems. Previous approaches such as ridge regression, support vector methods, and regularization networks are included as special cases. We show connections between the cost function and some properties up to now believed to apply to support vector machines only. For appropriately chosen cost functions, the optimal solution of all the problems described above can be found by solving a simple quadratic programming problem.

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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The moon tilt illusion

Schölkopf, B.

Perception, 27(10):1229-1232, August 1998 (article)

Abstract
Besides the familiar moon illusion [eg Hershenson, 1989 The Moon illusion (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates)], wherein the moon appears bigger when it is close to the horizon, there is a less known illusion which causes the moon‘s illuminated side to appear turned away from the direction of the sun. An experiment documenting the effect is described, and a possible explanation is put forward.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Characterization of the oligomerization defects of two p53 mutants found in families with Li-Fraumeni and Li-Fraumeni-like syndrome.

Davison, T., Yin, P., Nie, E., Kay, C., CH, ..

Oncogene, 17(5):651-656, August 1998 (article)

Abstract
Recently two germline mutations in the oligomerization domain of p53 have been identified in patients with Li-Fraumeni and Li-Fraumeni-like Syndromes. We have used biophysical and biochemical methods to characterize these two mutants in order to better understand their functional defects and the role of the p53 oligomerization domain (residues 325-355) in oncogenesis. We find that residues 310-360 of the L344P mutant are monomeric, apparently unfolded and cannot interact with wild-type (WT) p53. The full length L344P protein is unable to bind sequence specifically to DNA and is therefore an inactive, but not a dominant negative mutant. R337C, on the other hand, can form dimers and tetramers, can hetero-oligomerize with WTp53 and can bind to a p53 consensus element. However, the thermal stability of R337C is much lower than that of WTp53 and at physiological temperatures more than half of this mutant is less than tetrameric. Thus, the R337C mutant retains some functional activity yet leads to a predisposition to cancer, suggesting that even partial inactivation of p53 oligomerization is sufficient for accelerated tumour progression.

Web [BibTex]


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Nonlinear Component Analysis as a Kernel Eigenvalue Problem

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 10(5):1299-1319, July 1998 (article)

Abstract
A new method for performing a nonlinear form of principal component analysis is proposed. By the use of integral operator kernel functions, one can efficiently compute principal components in high-dimensional feature spaces, related to input space by some nonlinear map—for instance, the space of all possible five-pixel products in 16 × 16 images. We give the derivation of the method and present experimental results on polynomial feature extraction for pattern recognition.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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SVMs — a practical consequence of learning theory

Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Intelligent Systems and their Applications, 13(4):18-21, July 1998 (article)

Abstract
My first exposure to Support Vector Machines came this spring when heard Sue Dumais present impressive results on text categorization using this analysis technique. This issue's collection of essays should help familiarize our readers with this interesting new racehorse in the Machine Learning stable. Bernhard Scholkopf, in an introductory overview, points out that a particular advantage of SVMs over other learning algorithms is that it can be analyzed theoretically using concepts from computational learning theory, and at the same time can achieve good performance when applied to real problems. Examples of these real-world applications are provided by Sue Dumais, who describes the aforementioned text-categorization problem, yielding the best results to date on the Reuters collection, and Edgar Osuna, who presents strong results on application to face detection. Our fourth author, John Platt, gives us a practical guide and a new technique for implementing the algorithm efficiently.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Support vector machines

Hearst, M., Dumais, S., Osman, E., Platt, J., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Intelligent Systems and their Applications, 13(4):18-28, July 1998 (article)

Abstract
My first exposure to Support Vector Machines came this spring when heard Sue Dumais present impressive results on text categorization using this analysis technique. This issue's collection of essays should help familiarize our readers with this interesting new racehorse in the Machine Learning stable. Bernhard Scholkopf, in an introductory overview, points out that a particular advantage of SVMs over other learning algorithms is that it can be analyzed theoretically using concepts from computational learning theory, and at the same time can achieve good performance when applied to real problems. Examples of these real-world applications are provided by Sue Dumais, who describes the aforementioned text-categorization problem, yielding the best results to date on the Reuters collection, and Edgar Osuna, who presents strong results on application to face detection. Our fourth author, John Platt, gives us a practical guide and a new technique for implementing the algorithm efficiently.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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The connection between regularization operators and support vector kernels.

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

Neural Networks, 11(4):637-649, June 1998 (article)

Abstract
n this paper a correspondence is derived between regularization operators used in regularization networks and support vector kernels. We prove that the Green‘s Functions associated with regularization operators are suitable support vector kernels with equivalent regularization properties. Moreover, the paper provides an analysis of currently used support vector kernels in the view of regularization theory and corresponding operators associated with the classes of both polynomial kernels and translation invariant kernels. The latter are also analyzed on periodical domains. As a by-product we show that a large number of radial basis functions, namely conditionally positive definite functions, may be used as support vector kernels.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

Autonomous Robots, 5(1):111-125, March 1998 (article)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a topological representation of an open environment. The system represents selected places by local views of the surrounding scene, and finds traversable paths between them. The set of recorded views and their connections are combined into a graph model of the environment. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. In robot experiments, we demonstrate that complex visual exploration and navigation tasks can thus be performed without using metric information.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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No role for motion blur in either motion detection or motion based image segmentation

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 15 (2), pages: 297-306, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Determined the influence of high-spatial-frequency losses induced by motion on motion detection and on motion-based image segmentation. Motion detection and motion-based segmentation tasks were performed with either spectrally low-pass or spectrally broadband stimuli. Performance on these tasks was compared with a condition having no motion but in which form differences mimicked the perceptual loss of high spatial frequencies produced by motion. This allowed the relative salience of motion and motion-induced blur to be determined. Neither image segmentation nor motion detection was sensitive to the high-spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus the change in perceptual form produced in moving stimuli is not normally used as a cue either for motion detection or for motion-based image segmentation in ordinary situations.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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PET with 18fluorodeoxyglucose and hexamethylpropylene amine oxime SPECT in late whiplash syndrome

Bicik, I., Radanov, B., Schaefer, N., Dvorak, J., Blum, B., Weber, B., Burger, C., von Schulthess, G., Buck, A.

Neurology, 51, pages: 345-350, 1998 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Changes of cerebral blood flow during short-term exposure to normobaric hypoxia

Buck, A., Schirlo, C., Jasinsky, V., Weber, B., Burger, C., von Schulthess, G., Koller, E., Pavlicek, V.

J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 18, pages: 906-910, 1998 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der psychopathologischen Forschung.

Spitzer, M., Kammer, T., Bellemann, M., Brix, G., Layer, B., Maier, S., Kischka, U., Gückel, F.

Fortschritte der Neurologie Psychiatrie, 66, pages: 241-258, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Mental disorders are characterised by psychopathological symptoms which correspond to functional brain states. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used for the non-invasive study of cerebral activation patterns in man. First of all, the neurobiological principles and presuppositions of the method are outlined. Results from the Heidelberg imaging lab on several simple sensorimotor tasks as well as higher cognitive functions, such as working and semantic memory, are then presented. Thereafter, results from preliminary fMRI studies of psychopathological symptoms are discussed, with emphasis on hallucinations, psychomotoric phenomena, emotions, as well as obsessions and compulsions. Functional MRI is limited by the physics underlying the method, as well as by practical constraints regarding its use in conjunction with mentally ill patients. Within this framework, the problems of signal-to-noise ratio, data analysis strategies, motion correction, and neurovascular coupling are considered. Because of the rapid development of the field of fMRI, maps of higher cognitive functions and their respective pathology seem to be coming within easy reach.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]