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2019


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Neural Signatures of Motor Skill in the Resting Brain

Ozdenizci, O., Meyer, T., Wichmann, F., Peters, J., Schölkopf, B., Cetin, M., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man and Cybernetics (SMC 2019), October 2019 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

2019

[BibTex]


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Beta Power May Mediate the Effect of Gamma-TACS on Motor Performance

Mastakouri, A., Schölkopf, B., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC), July 2019 (conference) Accepted

arXiv PDF [BibTex]

arXiv PDF [BibTex]


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The Incomplete Rosetta Stone problem: Identifiability results for Multi-view Nonlinear ICA

Gresele*, L., Rubenstein*, P. K., Mehrjou, A., Locatello, F., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 35th Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), pages: 53, (Editors: Amir Globerson and Ricardo Silva), AUAI Press, July 2019, *equal contribution (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Kernel Mean Matching for Content Addressability of GANs

Jitkrittum*, W., Sangkloy*, P., Gondal, M. W., Raj, A., Hays, J., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 3140-3151, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, June 2019, *equal contribution (conference)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Challenging Common Assumptions in the Unsupervised Learning of Disentangled Representations

Locatello, F., Bauer, S., Lucic, M., Raetsch, G., Gelly, S., Schölkopf, B., Bachem, O.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 4114-4124, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, June 2019 (conference)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Local Temporal Bilinear Pooling for Fine-grained Action Parsing

Zhang, Y., Tang, S., Muandet, K., Jarvers, C., Neumann, H.

In Proceedings IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) 2019, June 2019 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Fine-grained temporal action parsing is important in many applications, such as daily activity understanding, human motion analysis, surgical robotics and others requiring subtle and precise operations in a long-term period. In this paper we propose a novel bilinear pooling operation, which is used in intermediate layers of a temporal convolutional encoder-decoder net. In contrast to other work, our proposed bilinear pooling is learnable and hence can capture more complex local statistics than the conventional counterpart. In addition, we introduce exact lower-dimension representations of our bilinear forms, so that the dimensionality is reduced with neither information loss nor extra computation. We perform intensive experiments to quantitatively analyze our model and show the superior performances to other state-of-the-art work on various datasets.

Code video demo pdf link (url) [BibTex]

Code video demo pdf link (url) [BibTex]


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Generate Semantically Similar Images with Kernel Mean Matching

Jitkrittum*, W., Sangkloy*, P., Gondal, M. W., Raj, A., Hays, J., Schölkopf, B.

6th Workshop Women in Computer Vision (WiCV) (oral presentation), June 2019, *equal contribution (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Robustly Disentangled Causal Mechanisms: Validating Deep Representations for Interventional Robustness

Suter, R., Miladinovic, D., Schölkopf, B., Bauer, S.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 6056-6065, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, June 2019 (conference)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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First-Order Adversarial Vulnerability of Neural Networks and Input Dimension

Simon-Gabriel, C., Ollivier, Y., Bottou, L., Schölkopf, B., Lopez-Paz, D.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 5809-5817, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, June 2019 (conference)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Overcoming Mean-Field Approximations in Recurrent Gaussian Process Models

Ialongo, A. D., Van Der Wilk, M., Hensman, J., Rasmussen, C. E.

In Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 2931-2940, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, June 2019 (inproceedings)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Meta learning variational inference for prediction

Gordon, J., Bronskill, J., Bauer, M., Nowozin, S., Turner, R.

7th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), May 2019 (conference) Accepted

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


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Deep Lagrangian Networks: Using Physics as Model Prior for Deep Learning

Lutter, M., Ritter, C., Peters, J.

7th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), May 2019 (conference) Accepted

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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DeepOBS: A Deep Learning Optimizer Benchmark Suite

Schneider, F., Balles, L., Hennig, P.

7th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), May 2019 (conference) Accepted

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Disentangled State Space Models: Unsupervised Learning of Dynamics across Heterogeneous Environments

Miladinović*, D., Gondal*, M. W., Schölkopf, B., Buhmann, J. M., Bauer, S.

Deep Generative Models for Highly Structured Data Workshop at ICLR, May 2019, *equal contribution (conference) Accepted

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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SOM-VAE: Interpretable Discrete Representation Learning on Time Series

Fortuin, V., Hüser, M., Locatello, F., Strathmann, H., Rätsch, G.

7th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), May 2019 (conference) Accepted

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Resampled Priors for Variational Autoencoders

Bauer, M., Mnih, A.

22nd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, April 2019 (conference) Accepted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Semi-Generative Modelling: Covariate-Shift Adaptation with Cause and Effect Features

von Kügelgen, J., Mey, A., Loog, M.

22nd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), April 2019 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Sobolev Descent

Mroueh, Y., Sercu, T., Raj, A.

22nd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), April 2019 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fast and Robust Shortest Paths on Manifolds Learned from Data

Arvanitidis, G., Hauberg, S., Hennig, P., Schober, M.

22nd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), April 2019 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Data scarcity, robustness and extreme multi-label classification

Babbar, R., Schölkopf, B.

Machine Learning, Special Issue of the ECML PKDD 2019 Journal Track, March 2019 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Learning Transferable Representations

Rojas-Carulla, M.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Sample-efficient deep reinforcement learning for continuous control

Gu, S.

University of Cambridge, UK, 2019 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]


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Enhancing Human Learning via Spaced Repetition Optimization

Tabibian, B., Upadhyay, U., De, A., Zarezade, A., Schölkopf, B., Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2019, PNAS published ahead of print January 22, 2019 (article)

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


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Spatial Filtering based on Riemannian Manifold for Brain-Computer Interfacing

Xu, J.

Technical University of Munich, Germany, 2019 (mastersthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning to Control Highly Accelerated Ballistic Movements on Muscular Robots

Büchler, D., Calandra, R., Peters, J.

2019 (article) Submitted

Abstract
High-speed and high-acceleration movements are inherently hard to control. Applying learning to the control of such motions on anthropomorphic robot arms can improve the accuracy of the control but might damage the system. The inherent exploration of learning approaches can lead to instabilities and the robot reaching joint limits at high speeds. Having hardware that enables safe exploration of high-speed and high-acceleration movements is therefore desirable. To address this issue, we propose to use robots actuated by Pneumatic Artificial Muscles (PAMs). In this paper, we present a four degrees of freedom (DoFs) robot arm that reaches high joint angle accelerations of up to 28000 °/s^2 while avoiding dangerous joint limits thanks to the antagonistic actuation and limits on the air pressure ranges. With this robot arm, we are able to tune control parameters using Bayesian optimization directly on the hardware without additional safety considerations. The achieved tracking performance on a fast trajectory exceeds previous results on comparable PAM-driven robots. We also show that our system can be controlled well on slow trajectories with PID controllers due to careful construction considerations such as minimal bending of cables, lightweight kinematics and minimal contact between PAMs and PAMs with the links. Finally, we propose a novel technique to control the the co-contraction of antagonistic muscle pairs. Experimental results illustrate that choosing the optimal co-contraction level is vital to reach better tracking performance. Through the use of PAM-driven robots and learning, we do a small step towards the future development of robots capable of more human-like motions.

Arxiv Video [BibTex]


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AReS and MaRS Adversarial and MMD-Minimizing Regression for SDEs

Abbati*, G., Wenk*, P., Osborne, M. A., Krause, A., Schölkopf, B., Bauer, S.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 97, pages: 1-10, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Chaudhuri, Kamalika and Salakhutdinov, Ruslan), PMLR, 2019, *equal contribution (conference)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Inferring causation from time series with perspectives in Earth system sciences

Runge, J., Bathiany, S., Bollt, E., Camps-Valls, G., Coumou, D., Deyle, E., Glymour, C., Kretschmer, M., Mahecha, M., van Nes, E., Peters, J., Quax, R., Reichstein, M., Scheffer, M. S. B., Spirtes, P., Sugihara, G., Sun, J., Zhang, K., Zscheischler, J.

Nature Communications, 2019 (article) In revision

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Stein Tests for Multiple Model Comparison

Lim, J. N., Yamada, M., Schölkopf, B., Jitkrittum, W.

2019 (conference) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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MYND: A Platform for Large-scale Neuroscientific Studies

Hohmann, M. R., Hackl, M., Wirth, B., Zaman, T., Enficiaud, R., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI), 2019 (conference) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Kernel Stein Test for Comparing Latent Variable Models

Kanagawa, H., Jitkrittum, W., Mackey, L., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A.

2019 (conference) Submitted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Fisher Efficient Inference of Intractable Models

Liu, S., Kanamori, T., Jitkrittum, W., Chen, Y.

2019 (conference) Submitted

arXiv [BibTex]

arXiv [BibTex]


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Fast Gaussian Process Based Gradient Matching for Parameter Identification in Systems of Nonlinear ODEs

Wenk, P., Gotovos, A., Bauer, S., Gorbach, N., Krause, A., Buhmann, J. M.

22nd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 2019 (conference) Accepted

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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From Variational to Deterministic Autoencoders

Ghosh*, P., Sajjadi*, M. S. M., Vergari, A., Black, M. J., Schölkopf, B.

2019, *equal contribution (conference) Submitted

Abstract
Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) provide a theoretically-backed framework for deep generative models. However, they often produce “blurry” images, which is linked to their training objective. Sampling in the most popular implementation, the Gaussian VAE, can be interpreted as simply injecting noise to the input of a deterministic decoder. In practice, this simply enforces a smooth latent space structure. We challenge the adoption of the full VAE framework on this specific point in favor of a simpler, deterministic one. Specifically, we investigate how substituting stochasticity with other explicit and implicit regularization schemes can lead to a meaningful latent space without having to force it to conform to an arbitrarily chosen prior. To retrieve a generative mechanism for sampling new data points, we propose to employ an efficient ex-post density estimation step that can be readily adopted both for the proposed deterministic autoencoders as well as to improve sample quality of existing VAEs. We show in a rigorous empirical study that regularized deterministic autoencoding achieves state-of-the-art sample quality on the common MNIST, CIFAR-10 and CelebA datasets.

arXiv [BibTex]

2002


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Learning with Kernels: Support Vector Machines, Regularization, Optimization, and Beyond

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

pages: 644, Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2002, Parts of this book, including an introduction to kernel methods, can be downloaded here. (book)

Abstract
In the 1990s, a new type of learning algorithm was developed, based on results from statistical learning theory: the Support Vector Machine (SVM). This gave rise to a new class of theoretically elegant learning machines that use a central concept of SVMs-kernels—for a number of learning tasks. Kernel machines provide a modular framework that can be adapted to different tasks and domains by the choice of the kernel function and the base algorithm. They are replacing neural networks in a variety of fields, including engineering, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. Learning with Kernels provides an introduction to SVMs and related kernel methods. Although the book begins with the basics, it also includes the latest research. It provides all of the concepts necessary to enable a reader equipped with some basic mathematical knowledge to enter the world of machine learning using theoretically well-founded yet easy-to-use kernel algorithms and to understand and apply the powerful algorithms that have been developed over the last few years.

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

(98), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, August 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the learning problem of finding a dependency between a general class of objects and another, possibly different, general class of objects. The objects can be for example: vectors, images, strings, trees or graphs. Such a task is made possible by employing similarity measures in both input and output spaces using kernel functions, thus embedding the objects into vector spaces. Output kernels also make it possible to encode prior information and/or invariances in the loss function in an elegant way. We experimentally validate our approach on several tasks: mapping strings to strings, pattern recognition, and reconstruction from partial images.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]