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2004


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Protein homology detection using string alignment kernels

Saigo, H., Vert, J., Ueda, N., Akutsu, T.

Bioinformatics, 20(11):1682-1689, 2004 (article)

Abstract
Remote homology detection between protein sequences is a central problem in computational biology. Discriminative methods involving support vector machines (SVM) are currently the most effective methods for the problem of superfamily recognition in the SCOP database. The performance of SVMs depend critically on the kernel function used to quantify the similarity between sequences. We propose new kernels for strings adapted to biological sequences, which we call local alignment kernels. These kernels measure the similarity between two sequences by summing up scores obtained from local alignments with gaps of the sequences. When tested in combination with SVM on their ability to recognize SCOP superfamilies on a benchmark dataset, the new kernels outperform state-of-the art methods for remote homology detection.

Web DOI [BibTex]

2004

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Minimizing the Cross Validation Error to Mix Kernel Matrices of Heterogeneous Biological Data

Tsuda, K., Uda, S., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Neural Processing Letters, 19, pages: 63-72, 2004 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Support Vector Regression

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

Statistics and Computing, 14(3):199-222, 2004 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Multivariate Regression via Stiefel Manifold Constraints

BakIr, G., Gretton, A., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3175, pages: 262-269, (Editors: CE Rasmussen and HH Bülthoff and B Schölkopf and MA Giese), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Pattern Recognition, Proceedings of the 26th DAGM Symposium, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a learning technique for regression between high-dimensional spaces. Standard methods typically reduce this task to many one-dimensional problems, with each output dimension considered independently. By contrast, in our approach the feature construction and the regression estimation are performed jointly, directly minimizing a loss function that we specify, subject to a rank constraint. A major advantage of this approach is that the loss is no longer chosen according to the algorithmic requirements, but can be tailored to the characteristics of the task at hand; the features will then be optimal with respect to this objective, and dependence between the outputs can be exploited.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Implicit estimation of Wiener series

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Machine Learning for Signal Processing XIV, Proc. 2004 IEEE Signal Processing Society Workshop, pages: 735-744, (Editors: A Barros and J Principe and J Larsen and T Adali and S Douglas), IEEE, New York, Machine Learning for Signal Processing XIV, Proc. IEEE Signal Processing Society Workshop, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Wiener series is one of the standard methods to systematically characterize the nonlinearity of a system. The classical estimation method of the expansion coefficients via cross-correlation suffers from severe problems that prevent its application to high-dimensional and strongly nonlinear systems. We propose an implicit estimation method based on regression in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space that alleviates these problems. Experiments show performance advantages in terms of convergence, interpretability, and system sizes that can be handled.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Hilbertian Metrics on Probability Measures and their Application in SVM’s

Hein, H., Lal, T., Bousquet, O.

In Pattern Recognition, Proceedings of th 26th DAGM Symposium, 3175, pages: 270-277, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: Rasmussen, C. E., H. H. Bülthoff, M. Giese and B. Schölkopf), Pattern Recognition, Proceedings of th 26th DAGM Symposium, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to investigate the field of Hilbertian metrics on probability measures. Since they are very versatile and can therefore be applied in various problems they are of great interest in kernel methods. Quit recently Tops{o}e and Fuglede introduced a family of Hilbertian metrics on probability measures. We give basic properties of the Hilbertian metrics of this family and other used metrics in the literature. Then we propose an extension of the considered metrics which incorporates structural information of the probability space into the Hilbertian metric. Finally we compare all proposed metrics in an image and text classification problem using histogram data.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Gasussian process model based predictive control

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Girard, A.

In Proceedings of the ACC 2004, pages: 2214-2219, Proceedings of the ACC, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identi cation of non-linear dynamic systems. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. Gaussian process models contain noticeably less coef cients to be optimised. This paper illustrates possible application of Gaussian process models within model-based predictive control. The extra information provided within Gaussian process model is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on control of pH process benchmark.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A New Variational Framework for Rigid-Body Alignment

Kato, T., Tsuda, K., Tomii, K., Asai, K.

In Joint IAPR International Workshops on Syntactical and Structural Pattern Recognition (SSPR 2004) and Statistical Pattern Recognition (SPR 2004), pages: 171-179, (Editors: Fred, A.,T. Caelli, R.P.W. Duin, A. Campilho and D. de Ridder), Joint IAPR International Workshops on Syntactical and Structural Pattern Recognition (SSPR) and Statistical Pattern Recognition (SPR), 2004 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Protein Classification via Kernel Matrix Completion

Kin, T., Kato, T., Tsuda, K.

In pages: 261-274, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J.P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA; USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Behaviour and Convergence of the Constrained Covariance

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Herbrich, R., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

(130), MPI for Biological Cybernetics, 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
We discuss reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS)-based measures of statistical dependence, with emphasis on constrained covariance (COCO), a novel criterion to test dependence of random variables. We show that COCO is a test for independence if and only if the associated RKHSs are universal. That said, no independence test exists that can distinguish dependent and independent random variables in all circumstances. Dependent random variables can result in a COCO which is arbitrarily close to zero when the source densities are highly non-smooth, which can make dependence hard to detect empirically. All current kernel-based independence tests share this behaviour. Finally, we demonstrate exponential convergence between the population and empirical COCO, which implies that COCO does not suffer from slow learning rates when used as a dependence test.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Early visual processing—data, theory, models

Wichmann, F.

Experimentelle Psychologie. Beitr{\"a}ge zur 46. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 46, pages: 24, 2004 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Statistical Learning with Similarity and Dissimilarity Functions

von Luxburg, U.

pages: 1-166, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, 2004 (phdthesis)

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Statistische Lerntheorie und Empirische Inferenz

Schölkopf, B.

Jahrbuch der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, 2004, pages: 377-382, 2004 (misc)

Abstract
Statistical learning theory studies the process of inferring regularities from empirical data. The fundamental problem is what is called generalization: how it is possible to infer a law which will be valid for an infinite number of future observations, given only a finite amount of data? This problem hinges upon fundamental issues of statistics and science in general, such as the problems of complexity of explanations, a priori knowledge, and representation of data.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Practical Method for Blind Inversion of Wiener Systems

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Proceedings of International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2004), pages: 2163-2168, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN), 2004, Volume 3 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian analysis of the Scatterometer Wind Retrieval Inverse Problem: Some New Approaches

Cornford, D., Csato, L., Evans, D., Opper, M.

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society B, 66, pages: 1-17, 3, 2004 (article)

Abstract
The retrieval of wind vectors from satellite scatterometer observations is a non-linear inverse problem.A common approach to solving inverse problems is to adopt a Bayesian framework and to infer the posterior distribution of the parameters of interest given the observations by using a likelihood model relating the observations to the parameters, and a prior distribution over the parameters.We show how Gaussian process priors can be used efficiently with a variety of likelihood models, using local forward (observation) models and direct inverse models for the scatterometer.We present an enhanced Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample from the resulting multimodal posterior distribution.We go on to show how the computational complexity of the inference can be controlled by using a sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm for estimation with Gaussian processes.This helps to overcome the most serious barrier to the use of probabilistic, Gaussian process methods in remote sensing inverse problems, which is the prohibitively large size of the data sets.We contrast the sampling results with the approximations that are found by using the sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines Using Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

International Journal on Artificial Intelligence Tools (Special Issue on Selected Papers from the 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence 2003), 13(4):791-800, 2004 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Semi-supervised kernel regression using whitened function classes

Franz, M., Kwon, Y., Rasmussen, C., Schölkopf, B.

In Pattern Recognition, Proceedings of the 26th DAGM Symposium, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3175, LNCS 3175, pages: 18-26, (Editors: CE Rasmussen and HH Bülthoff and MA Giese and B Schölkopf), Springer, Berlin, Gerrmany, 26th DAGM Symposium, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The use of non-orthonormal basis functions in ridge regression leads to an often undesired non-isotropic prior in function space. In this study, we investigate an alternative regularization technique that results in an implicit whitening of the basis functions by penalizing directions in function space with a large prior variance. The regularization term is computed from unlabelled input data that characterizes the input distribution. Tests on two datasets using polynomial basis functions showed an improved average performance compared to standard ridge regression.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Maximal Margin Classification for Metric Spaces

Hein, M., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, pages: 72-86, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and Warmuth, M. K.), Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 16. Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory / COLT Kernel, 2004 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this article we construct a maximal margin classification algorithm for arbitrary metric spaces. At first we show that the Support Vector Machine (SVM) is a maximal margin algorithm for the class of metric spaces where the negative squared distance is conditionally positive definite (CPD). This means that the metric space can be isometrically embedded into a Hilbert space, where one performs linear maximal margin separation. We will show that the solution only depends on the metric, but not on the kernel. Following the framework we develop for the SVM, we construct an algorithm for maximal margin classification in arbitrary metric spaces. The main difference compared with SVM is that we no longer embed isometrically into a Hilbert space, but a Banach space. We further give an estimate of the capacity of the function class involved in this algorithm via Rademacher averages. We recover an algorithm of Graepel et al. [6].

PDF PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF DOI [BibTex]


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On the Convergence of Spectral Clustering on Random Samples: The Normalized Case

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O., Belkin, M.

In Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Learning Theory, pages: 457-471, Proceedings of the 17th Annual Conference on Learning Theory, 2004 (inproceedings)

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Introduction to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O., Boucheron, S., Lugosi, G.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3176, pages: 169-207, (Editors: Bousquet, O., U. von Luxburg and G. Rätsch), Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Primer on Kernel Methods

Vert, J., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Kernel Methods in Computational Biology, pages: 35-70, (Editors: B Schölkopf and K Tsuda and JP Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Confidence Sets for Ratios: A Purely Geometric Approach To Fieller’s Theorem

von Luxburg, U., Franz, V.

(133), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 2004 (techreport)

Abstract
We present a simple, geometric method to construct Fieller's exact confidence sets for ratios of jointly normally distributed random variables. Contrary to previous geometric approaches in the literature, our method is valid in the general case where both sample mean and covariance are unknown. Moreover, not only the construction but also its proof are purely geometric and elementary, thus giving intuition into the nature of the confidence sets.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Transductive Inference with Graphs

Zhou, D., Schölkopf, B.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 2004, See the improved version Regularization on Discrete Spaces. (techreport)

Abstract
We propose a general regularization framework for transductive inference. The given data are thought of as a graph, where the edges encode the pairwise relationships among data. We develop discrete analysis and geometry on graphs, and then naturally adapt the classical regularization in the continuous case to the graph situation. A new and effective algorithm is derived from this general framework, as well as an approach we developed before.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine

Graf, AAB.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2004, online publication (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Optical Imaging of the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxidative Metabolism in the Rat Barrel Cortex

Weber, B., Burger, C., Wyss, M., von Schulthess, G., Scheffold, F., Buck, A.

European Journal of Neuroscience, 20(10):2664-2670, 2004 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kompetenzerwerb für Informationssysteme - Einfluss des Lernprozesses auf die Interaktion mit Fahrerinformationssystemen. Veröffentlichter Abschlussbericht (Förderkennzeichen BaSt FE 82.196/2001).

Totzke, I., Krüger, H., Hofmann, M., Meilinger, T., Rauch, N., Schmidt, G.

Interdisziplinäres Zentrum für Verkehrswissenschaften (IZVW), Würzburg, 2004 (techreport)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Phenotypic Characterization of Human Chondrocyte Cell Line C-20/A4: A Comparison between Monolayer and Alginate Suspension Culture

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Söder, S., Zien, A., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Cells Tissues Organs, 178(2):65-77, 2004 (article)

Abstract
DNA microarray analysis was used to investigate the molecular phenotype of one of the first human chondrocyte cell lines, C-20/A4, derived from juvenile costal chondrocytes by immortalization with origin-defective simian virus 40 large T antigen. Clontech Human Cancer Arrays 1.2 and quantitative PCR were used to examine gene expression profiles of C-20/A4 cells cultured in the presence of serum in monolayer and alginate beads. In monolayer cultures, genes involved in cell proliferation were strongly upregulated compared to those expressed by human adult articular chondrocytes in primary culture. Of the cell cycle-regulated genes, only two, the CDK regulatory subunit and histone H4, were downregulated after culture in alginate beads, consistent with the ability of these cells to proliferate in suspension culture. In contrast, the expression of several genes that are involved in pericellular matrix formation, including MMP-14, COL6A1, fibronectin, biglycan and decorin, was upregulated when the C-20/A4 cells were transferred to suspension culture in alginate. Also, nexin-1, vimentin, and IGFBP-3, which are known to be expressed by primary chondrocytes, were differentially expressed in our study. Consistent with the proliferative phenotype of this cell line, few genes involved in matrix synthesis and turnover were highly expressed in the presence of serum. These results indicate that immortalized chondrocyte cell lines, rather than substituting for primary chondrocytes, may serve as models for extending findings on chondrocyte function not achievable by the use of primary chondrocytes.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and their Potential Use in Signal Processing

Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O.

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, (Special issue on Signal Processing for Mining), 2004 (article) Accepted

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Concentration Inequalities

Boucheron, S., Lugosi, G., Bousquet, O.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3176, pages: 208-240, (Editors: Bousquet, O., U. von Luxburg and G. Rätsch), Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernels for graphs

Kashima, H., Tsuda, K., Inokuchi, A.

In pages: 155-170, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J.P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA; USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A primer on molecular biology

Zien, A.

In pages: 3-34, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J. P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2004 (inbook)

Abstract
Modern molecular biology provides a rich source of challenging machine learning problems. This tutorial chapter aims to provide the necessary biological background knowledge required to communicate with biologists and to understand and properly formalize a number of most interesting problems in this application domain. The largest part of the chapter (its first section) is devoted to the cell as the basic unit of life. Four aspects of cells are reviewed in sequence: (1) the molecules that cells make use of (above all, proteins, RNA, and DNA); (2) the spatial organization of cells (``compartmentalization''); (3) the way cells produce proteins (``protein expression''); and (4) cellular communication and evolution (of cells and organisms). In the second section, an overview is provided of the most frequent measurement technologies, data types, and data sources. Finally, important open problems in the analysis of these data (bioinformatics challenges) are briefly outlined.

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Implicit Wiener series for capturing higher-order interactions in images

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

Sensory coding and the natural environment, (Editors: Olshausen, B.A. and M. Lewicki), 2004 (poster)

Abstract
The information about the objects in an image is almost exclusively described by the higher-order interactions of its pixels. The Wiener series is one of the standard methods to systematically characterize these interactions. However, the classical estimation method of the Wiener expansion coefficients via cross-correlation suffers from severe problems that prevent its application to high-dimensional and strongly nonlinear signals such as images. We propose an estimation method based on regression in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space that overcomes these problems using polynomial kernels as known from Support Vector Machines and other kernel-based methods. Numerical experiments show performance advantages in terms of convergence, interpretability and system sizes that can be handled. By the time of the conference, we will be able to present first results on the higher-order structure of natural images.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Classification and Memory Behaviour of Man Revisited by Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

CSHL Meeting on Computational & Systems Neuroscience (COSYNE), 2004 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Advanced Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Machine Learning Summer School, 2004 (talk)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Learning Movement Primitives

Schaal, S., Peters, J., Nakanishi, J., Ijspeert, A.

In 11th International Symposium on Robotics Research (ISRR2003), pages: 561-572, (Editors: Dario, P. and Chatila, R.), Springer, ISRR, 2004, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper discusses a comprehensive framework for modular motor control based on a recently developed theory of dynamic movement primitives (DMP). DMPs are a formulation of movement primitives with autonomous nonlinear differential equations, whose time evolution creates smooth kinematic control policies. Model-based control theory is used to convert the outputs of these policies into motor commands. By means of coupling terms, on-line modifications can be incorporated into the time evolution of the differential equations, thus providing a rather flexible and reactive framework for motor planning and execution. The linear parameterization of DMPs lends itself naturally to supervised learning from demonstration. Moreover, the temporal, scale, and translation invariance of the differential equations with respect to these parameters provides a useful means for movement recognition. A novel reinforcement learning technique based on natural stochastic policy gradients allows a general approach of improving DMPs by trial and error learning with respect to almost arbitrary optimization criteria. We demonstrate the different ingredients of the DMP approach in various examples, involving skill learning from demonstration on the humanoid robot DB, and learning biped walking from demonstration in simulation, including self-improvement of the movement patterns towards energy efficiency through resonance tuning.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2003


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Natural Actor-Critic

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

NIPS Workshop " Planning for the Real World: The promises and challenges of dealing with uncertainty", December 2003 (poster)

PDF Web [BibTex]

2003

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning Control and Planning from the View of Control Theory and Imitation

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

NIPS Workshop "Planning for the Real World: The promises and challenges of dealing with uncertainty", December 2003 (talk)

Abstract
Learning control and planning in high dimensional continuous state-action systems, e.g., as needed in a humanoid robot, has so far been a domain beyond the applicability of generic planning techniques like reinforcement learning and dynamic programming. This talk describes an approach we have taken in order to enable complex robotics systems to learn to accomplish control tasks. Adaptive learning controllers equipped with statistical learning techniques can be used to learn tracking controllers -- missing state information and uncertainty in the state estimates are usually addressed by observers or direct adaptive control methods. Imitation learning is used as an ingredient to seed initial control policies whose output is a desired trajectory suitable to accomplish the task at hand. Reinforcement learning with stochastic policy gradients using a natural gradient forms the third component that allows refining the initial control policy until the task is accomplished. In comparison to general learning control, this approach is highly prestructured and thus more domain specific. However, it seems to be a theoretically clean and feasible strategy for control systems of the complexity that we need to address.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Molecular phenotyping of human chondrocyte cell lines T/C-28a2, T/C-28a4, and C-28/I2

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Zien, A., Gebhard, P., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Arthritis & Rheumatism, 48(12):3395-3403, December 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Study on Rainfall - Runoff Models for Improving Ensemble Streamflow Prediction: 1. Rainfallrunoff Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

Jeong, D., Kim, Y., Cho, S., Shin, H.

Journal of the Korean Society of Civil Engineers, 23(6B):521-530, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
The previous ESP (Ensemble Streamflow Prediction) studies conducted in Korea reported that the modeling error is a major source of the ESP forecast error in winter and spring (i.e. dry seasons), and thus suggested that improving the rainfall-runoff model would be critical to obtain more accurate probabilistic forecasts with ESP. This study used two types of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), such as a Single Neural Network (SNN) and an Ensemble Neural Networks (ENN), to improve the simulation capability of the rainfall-runoff model of the ESP forecasting system for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam. Applied for the first time to Korean hydrology, ENN combines the outputs of member models so that it can control the generalization error better than SNN. Because the dry and the flood season in Korea shows considerably different streamflow characteristics, this study calibrated the rainfall-runoff model separately for each season. Therefore, four rainfall-runoff models were developed according to the ANN types and the seasons. This study compared the ANN models with a conceptual rainfall-runoff model called TANK and verified that the ANN models were superior to TANK. Among the ANN models, ENN was more accurate than SNN. The ANN model performance was improved when the model was calibrated separately for the dry and the flood season. The best ANN model developed in this article will be incorporated into the ESP system to increase the forecast capability of ESP for the monthly inflow to the Daecheong dam.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Quantitative Cerebral Blood Flow Measurements in the Rat Using a Beta-Probe and H215O

Weber, B., Spaeth, N., Wyss, M., Wild, D., Burger, C., Stanley, R., Buck, A.

Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, 23(12):1455-1460, December 2003 (article)

Abstract
Beta-probes are a relatively new tool for tracer kinetic studies in animals. They are highly suited to evaluate new positron emission tomography tracers or measure physiologic parameters at rest and after some kind of stimulation or intervention. In many of these experiments, the knowledge of CBF is highly important. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the method of CBF measurements using a beta-probe and H215O. CBF was measured in the barrel cortex of eight rats at baseline and after acetazolamide challenge. Trigeminal nerve stimulation was additionally performed in five animals. In each category, three injections of 250 to 300 MBq H215O were performed at 10-minute intervals. Data were analyzed using a standard one-tissue compartment model (K1 = CBF, k2 = CBF/p, where p is the partition coefficient). Values for K1 were 0.35 plusminus 0.09, 0.58 plusminus 0.16, and 0.49 plusminus 0.03 mL dot min-1 dot mL-1 at rest, after acetazolamide challenge, and during trigeminal nerve stimulation, respectively. The corresponding values for k2 were 0.55 plusminus 0.12, 0.94 plusminus 0.16, and 0.85 plusminus 0.12 min-7, and for p were 0.64 plusminus 0.05, 0.61 plusminus 0.07, and 0.59 plusminus 0.06.The standard deviation of the difference between two successive experiments, a measure for the reproducibility of the method, was 10.1%, 13.0%, and 5.7% for K1, k2, and p, respectively. In summary, beta-probes in conjunction with H215O allow the reproducible quantitative measurement of CBF, although some systematic underestimation seems to occur, probably because of partial volume effects.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Recurrent neural networks from learning attractor dynamics

Schaal, S., Peters, J.

NIPS Workshop on RNNaissance: Recurrent Neural Networks, December 2003 (talk)

Abstract
Many forms of recurrent neural networks can be understood in terms of dynamic systems theory of difference equations or differential equations. Learning in such systems corresponds to adjusting some internal parameters to obtain a desired time evolution of the network, which can usually be characterized in term of point attractor dynamics, limit cycle dynamics, or, in some more rare cases, as strange attractor or chaotic dynamics. Finding a stable learning process to adjust the open parameters of the network towards shaping the desired attractor type and basin of attraction has remain a complex task, as the parameter trajectories during learning can lead the system through a variety of undesirable unstable behaviors, such that learning may never succeed. In this presentation, we review a recently developed learning framework for a class of recurrent neural networks that employs a more structured network approach. We assume that the canonical system behavior is known a priori, e.g., it is a point attractor or a limit cycle. With either supervised learning or reinforcement learning, it is possible to acquire the transformation from a simple representative of this canonical behavior (e.g., a 2nd order linear point attractor, or a simple limit cycle oscillator) to the desired highly complex attractor form. For supervised learning, one shot learning based on locally weighted regression techniques is possible. For reinforcement learning, stochastic policy gradient techniques can be employed. In any case, the recurrent network learned by these methods inherits the stability properties of the simple dynamic system that underlies the nonlinear transformation, such that stability of the learning approach is not a problem. We demonstrate the success of this approach for learning various skills on a humanoid robot, including tasks that require to incorporate additional sensory signals as coupling terms to modify the recurrent network evolution on-line.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Support Vector Channel Selection in BCI

Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hinterberger, T., Weston, J., Bogdan, M., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

(120), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tuebingen, Germany, December 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
Designing a Brain Computer Interface (BCI) system one can choose from a variety of features that may be useful for classifying brain activity during a mental task. For the special case of classifying EEG signals we propose the usage of the state of the art feature selection algorithms Recursive Feature Elimination [3] and Zero-Norm Optimization [13] which are based on the training of Support Vector Machines (SVM) [11]. These algorithms can provide more accurate solutions than standard filter methods for feature selection [14]. We adapt the methods for the purpose of selecting EEG channels. For a motor imagery paradigm we show that the number of used channels can be reduced significantly without increasing the classification error. The resulting best channels agree well with the expected underlying cortical activity patterns during the mental tasks. Furthermore we show how time dependent task specific information can be visualized.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Texture and haptic cues in slant discrimination: Measuring the effect of texture type on cue combination

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Ernst, M., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 3(12):26, 2003 Fall Vision Meeting of the Optical Society of America, December 2003 (poster)

Abstract
In a number of models of depth cue combination the depth percept is constructed via a weighted average combination of independent depth estimations. The influence of each cue in such average depends on the reliability of the source of information. (Young, Landy, & Maloney, 1993; Ernst & Banks, 2002.) In particular, Ernst & Banks (2002) formulate the combination performed by the human brain as that of the minimum variance unbiased estimator that can be constructed from the available cues. Using slant discrimination and slant judgment via probe adjustment as tasks, we have observed systematic differences in performance of human observers when a number of different types of textures were used as cue to slant (Rosas, Wichmann & Wagemans, 2003). If the depth percept behaves as described above, our measurements of the slopes of the psychometric functions provide the predicted weights for the texture cue for the ranked texture types. We have combined these texture types with object motion but the obtained results are difficult to reconcile with the unbiased minimum variance estimator model (Rosas & Wagemans, 2003). This apparent failure of such model might be explained by the existence of a coupling of texture and motion, violating the assumption of independence of cues. Hillis, Ernst, Banks, & Landy (2002) have shown that while for between-modality combination the human visual system has access to the single-cue information, for within-modality combination (visual cues: disparity and texture) the single-cue information is lost, suggesting a coupling between these cues. Then, in the present study we combine the different texture types with haptic information in a slant discrimination task, to test whether in the between-modality condition the texture cue and the haptic cue to slant are combined as predicted by an unbiased, minimum variance estimator model.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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How to Deal with Large Dataset, Class Imbalance and Binary Output in SVM based Response Model

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 93-107, Korean Data Mining Conference, December 2003, Best Paper Award (inproceedings)

Abstract
[Abstract]: Various machine learning methods have made a rapid transition to response modeling in search of improved performance. And support vector machine (SVM) has also been attracting much attention lately. This paper presents an SVM response model. We are specifically focusing on the how-to’s to circumvent practical obstacles, such as how to face with class imbalance problem, how to produce the scores from an SVM classifier for lift chart analysis, and how to evaluate the models on accuracy and profit. Besides coping with the intractability problem of SVM training caused by large marketing dataset, a previously proposed pattern selection algorithm is introduced. SVM training accompanies time complexity of the cube of training set size. The pattern selection algorithm picks up important training patterns before SVM response modeling. We made comparison on SVM training results between the pattern selection algorithm and random sampling. Three aspects of SVM response models were evaluated: accuracies, lift chart analysis, and computational efficiency. The SVM trained with selected patterns showed a high accuracy, a high uplift in profit and in response rate, and a high computational efficiency.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Blind separation of post-nonlinear mixtures using linearizing transformations and temporal decorrelation

Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Harmeling, S., Müller, K.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 4(7-8):1319-1338, November 2003 (article)

Abstract
We propose two methods that reduce the post-nonlinear blind source separation problem (PNL-BSS) to a linear BSS problem. The first method is based on the concept of maximal correlation: we apply the alternating conditional expectation (ACE) algorithm--a powerful technique from non-parametric statistics--to approximately invert the componentwise nonlinear functions. The second method is a Gaussianizing transformation, which is motivated by the fact that linearly mixed signals before nonlinear transformation are approximately Gaussian distributed. This heuristic, but simple and efficient procedure works as good as the ACE method. Using the framework provided by ACE, convergence can be proven. The optimal transformations obtained by ACE coincide with the sought-after inverse functions of the nonlinearities. After equalizing the nonlinearities, temporal decorrelation separation (TDSEP) allows us to recover the source signals. Numerical simulations testing "ACE-TD" and "Gauss-TD" on realistic examples are performed with excellent results.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Correlated stage- and subfield-associated hippocampal gene expression patterns in experimental and human temporal lobe epilepsy

Becker, A., Chen, J., Zien, A., Sochivko, D., Normann, S., Schramm, J., Elger, C., Wiestler, O., Blumcke, I.

European Journal of Neuroscience, 18(10):2792-2802, November 2003 (article)

Abstract
Epileptic activity evokes profound alterations of hippocampal organization and function. Genomic responses may reflect immediate consequences of excitatory stimulation as well as sustained molecular processes related to neuronal plasticity and structural remodeling. Using oligonucleotide microarrays with 8799 sequences, we determined subregional gene expression profiles in rats subjected to pilocarpine-induced epilepsy (U34A arrays, Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA; P < 0.05, twofold change, n = 3 per stage). Patterns of gene expression corresponded to distinct stages of epilepsy development. The highest number of differentially expressed genes (dentate gyrus, approx. 400 genes and CA1, approx. 700 genes) was observed 3 days after status epilepticus. The majority of up-regulated genes was associated with mechanisms of cellular stress and injury - 14 days after status epilepticus, numerous transcription factors and genes linked to cytoskeletal and synaptic reorganization were differentially expressed and, in the stage of chronic spontaneous seizures, distinct changes were observed in the transcription of genes involved in various neurotransmission pathways and between animals with low vs. high seizure frequency. A number of genes (n = 18) differentially expressed during the chronic epileptic stage showed corresponding expression patterns in hippocampal subfields of patients with pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 5 temporal lobe epilepsy patients; U133A microarrays, Affymetrix; covering 22284 human sequences). These data provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis and seizure-associated cellular and structural remodeling of the hippocampus.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Concentration Inequalities for Sub-Additive Functions Using the Entropy Method

Bousquet, O.

Stochastic Inequalities and Applications, 56, pages: 213-247, Progress in Probability, (Editors: Giné, E., C. Houdré and D. Nualart), November 2003 (article)

Abstract
We obtain exponential concentration inequalities for sub-additive functions of independent random variables under weak conditions on the increments of those functions, like the existence of exponential moments for these increments. As a consequence of these general inequalities, we obtain refinements of Talagrand's inequality for empirical processes and new bounds for randomized empirical processes. These results are obtained by further developing the entropy method introduced by Ledoux.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Learning Theory and Kernel Machines: 16th Annual Conference on Learning Theory and 7th Kernel Workshop (COLT/Kernel 2003), LNCS Vol. 2777

Schölkopf, B., Warmuth, M.

Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Learning Theory and 7th Kernel Workshop (COLT/Kernel 2003), COLT/Kernel 2003, pages: 746, Springer, Berlin, Germany, 16th Annual Conference on Learning Theory and 7th Kernel Workshop, November 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science ; 2777 (proceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian Monte Carlo

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 489-496, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate Bayesian alternatives to classical Monte Carlo methods for evaluating integrals. Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) allows the incorporation of prior knowledge, such as smoothness of the integrand, into the estimation. In a simple problem we show that this outperforms any classical importance sampling method. We also attempt more challenging multidimensional integrals involved in computing marginal likelihoods of statistical models (a.k.a. partition functions and model evidences). We find that Bayesian Monte Carlo outperformed Annealed Importance Sampling, although for very high dimensional problems or problems with massive multimodality BMC may be less adequate. One advantage of the Bayesian approach to Monte Carlo is that samples can be drawn from any distribution. This allows for the possibility of active design of sample points so as to maximise information gain.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]