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2013


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Rapid Distance-Based Outlier Detection via Sampling

Sugiyama, M., Borgwardt, KM.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 467-475, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and M. Welling and Z. Ghahramani and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

2013

PDF [BibTex]


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Probabilistic Movement Primitives

Paraschos, A., Daniel, C., Peters, J., Neumann, G.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 2616-2624, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and M. Welling and Z. Ghahramani and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Causal Inference on Time Series using Restricted Structural Equation Models

Peters, J., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 154-162, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges, L. Bottou, M. Welling, Z. Ghahramani, and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Regression-tree Tuning in a Streaming Setting

Kpotufe, S., Orabona, F.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 1788-1796, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and M. Welling and Z. Ghahramani and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Density estimation from unweighted k-nearest neighbor graphs: a roadmap

von Luxburg, U., Alamgir, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 225-233, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges and L. Bottou and M. Welling and Z. Ghahramani and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Open-Box Spectral Clustering: Applications to Medical Image Analysis

Schultz, T., Kindlmann, G.

IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 19(12):2100-2108, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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PAC-Bayes-Empirical-Bernstein Inequality

Tolstikhin, I. O., Seldin, Y.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 26, pages: 109-117, (Editors: C.J.C. Burges, L. Bottou, M. Welling, Z. Ghahramani, and K.Q. Weinberger), 27th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2013 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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im3shape: a maximum likelihood galaxy shear measurement code for cosmic gravitational lensing

Zuntz, J., Kacprzak, T., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M., Rowe, B., Bridle, S.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 434(2):1604-1618, Oxford University Press, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Linear mixed models for genome-wide association studies

Lippert, C.

University of Tübingen, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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PLAL: Cluster-based active learning

Urner, R., Wulff, S., Ben-David, S.

In Proceedings of the 26th Annual Conference on Learning Theory, 30, pages: 376-397, (Editors: Shalev-Shwartz, S. and Steinwart, I.), JMLR, COLT, 2013 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Maximizing Kepler science return per telemetered pixel: Detailed models of the focal plane in the two-wheel era

Hogg, D. W., Angus, R., Barclay, T., Dawson, R., Fergus, R., Foreman-Mackey, D., Harmeling, S., Hirsch, M., Lang, D., Montet, B. T., Schiminovich, D., Schölkopf, B.

arXiv:1309.0653, 2013 (techreport)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Accurate detection of differential RNA processing

Drewe, P., Stegle, O., Hartmann, L., Kahles, A., Bohnert, R., Wachter, A., Borgwardt, K. M., Rätsch, G.

Nucleic Acids Research, 41(10):5189-5198, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Monochromatic Bi-Clustering

Wulff, S., Urner, R., Ben-David, S.

In Proceedings of the 30th International Conference on Machine Learning, 28, pages: 145-153, (Editors: Dasgupta, S. and McAllester, D.), JMLR, ICML, 2013 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Maximizing Kepler science return per telemetered pixel: Searching the habitable zones of the brightest stars

Montet, B. T., Angus, R., Barclay, T., Dawson, R., Fergus, R., Foreman-Mackey, D., Harmeling, S., Hirsch, M., Hogg, D. W., Lang, D., Schiminovich, D., Schölkopf, B.

arXiv:1309.0654, 2013 (techreport)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Detecting regulatory gene–environment interactions with unmeasured environmental factors

Fusi, N., Lippert, C., Borgwardt, K. M., Lawrence, N. D., Stegle, O.

Bioinformatics, 29(11):1382-1389, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Significance of variable height-bandwidth group delay filters in the spectral reconstruction of speech

Devanshu, A., Raj, A., Hegde, R. M.

INTERSPEECH 2013, 14th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, pages: 1682-1686, 2013 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Generative Multiple-Instance Learning Models For Quantitative Electromyography

Adel, T., Smith, B., Urner, R., Stashuk, D., Lizotte, D. J.

In Proceedings of the 29th Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence, AUAI Press, UAI, 2013 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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On the Relations and Differences between Popper Dimension, Exclusion Dimension and VC-Dimension

Seldin, Y., Schölkopf, B.

In Empirical Inference - Festschrift in Honor of Vladimir N. Vapnik, pages: 53-57, 6, (Editors: Schölkopf, B., Luo, Z. and Vovk, V.), Springer, 2013 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling and Learning Complex Motor Tasks: A case study on Robot Table Tennis

Mülling, K.

Technical University Darmstadt, Germany, 2013 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]


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Fragmentation of Slow Wave Sleep after Onset of Complete Locked-In State

Soekadar, S. R., Born, J., Birbaumer, N., Bensch, M., Halder, S., Murguialday, A. R., Gharabaghi, A., Nijboer, F., Schölkopf, B., Martens, S.

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, 9(9):951-953, 2013 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Automatic Malaria Diagnosis system

Mehrjou, A., Abbasian, T., Izadi, M.

In First RSI/ISM International Conference on Robotics and Mechatronics (ICRoM), pages: 205-211, 2013 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Structural learning

Braun, D

Scholarpedia, 8(10):12312, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Structural learning in motor control refers to a metalearning process whereby an agent extracts (abstract) invariants from its sensorimotor stream when experiencing a range of environments that share similar structure. Such invariants can then be exploited for faster generalization and learning-to-learn when experiencing novel, but related task environments.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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The effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions

Grau-Moya, J, Hez, E, Pezzulo, G, Braun, DA

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 10(87):1-11, October 2013 (article)

Abstract
Decision-makers have been shown to rely on probabilistic models for perception and action. However, these models can be incorrect or partially wrong in which case the decision-maker has to cope with model uncertainty. Model uncertainty has recently also been shown to be an important determinant of sensorimotor behaviour in humans that can lead to risk-sensitive deviations from Bayes optimal behaviour towards worst-case or best-case outcomes. Here, we investigate the effect of model uncertainty on cooperation in sensorimotor interactions similar to the stag-hunt game, where players develop models about the other player and decide between a pay-off-dominant cooperative solution and a risk-dominant, non-cooperative solution. In simulations, we show that players who allow for optimistic deviations from their opponent model are much more likely to converge to cooperative outcomes. We also implemented this agent model in a virtual reality environment, and let human subjects play against a virtual player. In this game, subjects' pay-offs were experienced as forces opposing their movements. During the experiment, we manipulated the risk sensitivity of the computer player and observed human responses. We found not only that humans adaptively changed their level of cooperation depending on the risk sensitivity of the computer player but also that their initial play exhibited characteristic risk-sensitive biases. Our results suggest that model uncertainty is an important determinant of cooperation in two-player sensorimotor interactions.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Thermodynamics as a theory of decision-making with information-processing costs

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London A, 469(2153):1-18, May 2013 (article)

Abstract
Perfectly rational decision-makers maximize expected utility, but crucially ignore the resource costs incurred when determining optimal actions. Here, we propose a thermodynamically inspired formalization of bounded rational decision-making where information processing is modelled as state changes in thermodynamic systems that can be quantified by differences in free energy. By optimizing a free energy, bounded rational decision-makers trade off expected utility gains and information-processing costs measured by the relative entropy. As a result, the bounded rational decision-making problem can be rephrased in terms of well-known variational principles from statistical physics. In the limit when computational costs are ignored, the maximum expected utility principle is recovered. We discuss links to existing decision-making frameworks and applications to human decision-making experiments that are at odds with expected utility theory. Since most of the mathematical machinery can be borrowed from statistical physics, the main contribution is to re-interpret the formalism of thermodynamic free-energy differences in terms of bounded rational decision-making and to discuss its relationship to human decision-making experiments.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Abstraction in Decision-Makers with Limited Information Processing Capabilities

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

pages: 1-9, NIPS Workshop Planning with Information Constraints for Control, Reinforcement Learning, Computational Neuroscience, Robotics and Games, December 2013 (conference)

Abstract
A distinctive property of human and animal intelligence is the ability to form abstractions by neglecting irrelevant information which allows to separate structure from noise. From an information theoretic point of view abstractions are desirable because they allow for very efficient information processing. In artificial systems abstractions are often implemented through computationally costly formations of groups or clusters. In this work we establish the relation between the free-energy framework for decision-making and rate-distortion theory and demonstrate how the application of rate-distortion for decision-making leads to the emergence of abstractions. We argue that abstractions are induced due to a limit in information processing capacity.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Bounded Rational Decision-Making in Changing Environments

Grau-Moya, J, Braun, DA

pages: 1-9, NIPS Workshop Planning with Information Constraints for Control, Reinforcement Learning, Computational Neuroscience, Robotics and Games, December 2013 (conference)

Abstract
A perfectly rational decision-maker chooses the best action with the highest utility gain from a set of possible actions. The optimality principles that describe such decision processes do not take into account the computational costs of finding the optimal action. Bounded rational decision-making addresses this problem by specifically trading off information-processing costs and expected utility. Interestingly, a similar trade-off between energy and entropy arises when describing changes in thermodynamic systems. This similarity has been recently used to describe bounded rational agents. Crucially, this framework assumes that the environment does not change while the decision-maker is computing the optimal policy. When this requirement is not fulfilled, the decision-maker will suffer inefficiencies in utility, that arise because the current policy is optimal for an environment in the past. Here we borrow concepts from non-equilibrium thermodynamics to quantify these inefficiencies and illustrate with simulations its relationship with computational resources.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]

2005


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Spectral clustering and transductive inference for graph data

Zhou, D.

NIPS Workshop on Kernel Methods and Structured Domains, December 2005 (talk)

PDF Web [BibTex]

2005

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods for Measuring Independence

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 6, pages: 2075-2129, December 2005 (article)

Abstract
We introduce two new functionals, the constrained covariance and the kernel mutual information, to measure the degree of independence of random variables. These quantities are both based on the covariance between functions of the random variables in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHSs). We prove that when the RKHSs are universal, both functionals are zero if and only if the random variables are pairwise independent. We also show that the kernel mutual information is an upper bound near independence on the Parzen window estimate of the mutual information. Analogous results apply for two correlation-based dependence functionals introduced earlier: we show the kernel canonical correlation and the kernel generalised variance to be independence measures for universal kernels, and prove the latter to be an upper bound on the mutual information near independence. The performance of the kernel dependence functionals in measuring independence is verified in the context of independent component analysis.

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]

PDF PostScript PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel ICA for Large Scale Problems

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A., Achlioptas, D.

In pages: -, NIPS Workshop on Large Scale Kernel Machines, December 2005 (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Infinite dimensional exponential families by reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces

Fukumizu, K.

In IGAIA 2005, pages: 324-333, 2nd International Symposium on Information Geometry and its Applications, December 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to propose a method of constructing exponential families of Hilbert manifold, on which estimation theory can be built. Although there have been works on infinite dimensional exponential families of Banach manifolds (Pistone and Sempi, 1995; Gibilisco and Pistone, 1998; Pistone and Rogantin, 1999), they are not appropriate to discuss statistical estimation with finite number of samples; the likelihood function with finite samples is not continuous on the manifold. In this paper we use a reproducing kernel Hilbert space as a functional space for constructing an exponential manifold. A reproducing kernel Hilbert space is dened as a Hilbert space of functions such that evaluation of a function at an arbitrary point is a continuous functional on the Hilbert space. Since we can discuss the value of a function with this space, it is very natural to use a manifold associated with a reproducing kernel Hilbert space as a basis of estimation theory. We focus on the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) with the exponential manifold of a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. As in many non-parametric estimation methods, straightforward extension of MLE to an infinite dimensional exponential manifold suffers the problem of ill-posedness caused by the fact that the estimator should be chosen from the infinite dimensional space with only finite number of constraints given by the data. To solve this problem, a pseudo-maximum likelihood method is proposed by restricting the infinite dimensional manifold to a series of finite dimensional submanifolds, which enlarge as the number of samples increases. Some asymptotic results in the limit of infinite samples are shown, including the consistency of the pseudo-MLE.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Some thoughts about Gaussian Processes

Chapelle, O.

NIPS Workshop on Open Problems in Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning, December 2005 (talk)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Unifying View of Sparse Approximate Gaussian Process Regression

Quinonero Candela, J., Rasmussen, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 6, pages: 1935-1959, December 2005 (article)

Abstract
We provide a new unifying view, including all existing proper probabilistic sparse approximations for Gaussian process regression. Our approach relies on expressing the effective prior which the methods are using. This allows new insights to be gained, and highlights the relationship between existing methods. It also allows for a clear theoretically justified ranking of the closeness of the known approximations to the corresponding full GPs. Finally we point directly to designs of new better sparse approximations, combining the best of the existing strategies, within attractive computational constraints.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Method and device for detection of splice form and alternative splice forms in DNA or RNA sequences

Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K., Schölkopf, B.

European Patent Application, International No PCT/EP2005/005783, December 2005 (patent)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Popper, Falsification and the VC-dimension

Corfield, D., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

(145), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, November 2005 (techreport)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Shortest-path kernels on graphs

Borgwardt, KM., Kriegel, H-P.

In pages: 74-81, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, Fifth International Conference on Data Mining (ICDM), November 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Data mining algorithms are facing the challenge to deal with an increasing number of complex objects. For graph data, a whole toolbox of data mining algorithms becomes available by defining a kernel function on instances of graphs. Graph kernels based on walks, subtrees and cycles in graphs have been proposed so far. As a general problem, these kernels are either computationally expensive or limited in their expressiveness. We try to overcome this problem by defining expressive graph kernels which are based on paths. As the computation of all paths and longest paths in a graph is NP-hard, we propose graph kernels based on shortest paths. These kernels are computable in polynomial time, retain expressivity and are still positive definite. In experiments on classification of graph models of proteins, our shortest-path kernels show significantly higher classification accuracy than walk-based kernels.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Extension to Kernel Dependency Estimation with Applications to Robotics

BakIr, G.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, November 2005 (phdthesis)

Abstract
Kernel Dependency Estimation(KDE) is a novel technique which was designed to learn mappings between sets without making assumptions on the type of the involved input and output data. It learns the mapping in two stages. In a first step, it tries to estimate coordinates of a feature space representation of elements of the set by solving a high dimensional multivariate regression problem in feature space. Following this, it tries to reconstruct the original representation given the estimated coordinates. This thesis introduces various algorithmic extensions to both stages in KDE. One of the contributions of this thesis is to propose a novel linear regression algorithm that explores low-dimensional subspaces during learning. Furthermore various existing strategies for reconstructing patterns from feature maps involved in KDE are discussed and novel pre-image techniques are introduced. In particular, pre-image techniques for data-types that are of discrete nature such as graphs and strings are investigated. KDE is then explored in the context of robot pose imitation where the input is a an image with a human operator and the output is the robot articulated variables. Thus, using KDE, robot pose imitation is formulated as a regression problem.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel methods for dependence testing in LFP-MUA

Gretton, A., Belitski, A., Murayama, Y., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

35(689.17), 35th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), November 2005 (poster)

Abstract
A fundamental problem in neuroscience is determining whether or not particular neural signals are dependent. The correlation is the most straightforward basis for such tests, but considerable work also focuses on the mutual information (MI), which is capable of revealing dependence of higher orders that the correlation cannot detect. That said, there are other measures of dependence that share with the MI an ability to detect dependence of any order, but which can be easier to compute in practice. We focus in particular on tests based on the functional covariance, which derive from work originally accomplished in 1959 by Renyi. Conceptually, our dependence tests work by computing the covariance between (infinite dimensional) vectors of nonlinear mappings of the observations being tested, and then determining whether this covariance is zero - we call this measure the constrained covariance (COCO). When these vectors are members of universal reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, we can prove this covariance to be zero only when the variables being tested are independent. The greatest advantage of these tests, compared with the mutual information, is their simplicity – when comparing two signals, we need only take the largest eigenvalue (or the trace) of a product of two matrices of nonlinearities, where these matrices are generally much smaller than the number of observations (and are very simple to construct). We compare the mutual information, the COCO, and the correlation in the context of finding changes in dependence between the LFP and MUA signals in the primary visual cortex of the anaesthetized macaque, during the presentation of dynamic natural stimuli. We demonstrate that the MI and COCO reveal dependence which is not detected by the correlation alone (which we prove by artificially removing all correlation between the signals, and then testing their dependence with COCO and the MI); and that COCO and the MI give results consistent with each other on our data.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Training Support Vector Machines with Multiple Equality Constraints

Kienzle, W., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Machine Learning, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3720, pages: 182-193, (Editors: JG Carbonell and J Siekmann), Springer, Berlin, Germany, ECML, November 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a primal-dual decomposition algorithm for support vector machine training. As with existing methods that use very small working sets (such as Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO), Successive Over-Relaxation (SOR) or the Kernel Adatron (KA)), our method scales well, is straightforward to implement, and does not require an external QP solver. Unlike SMO, SOR and KA, the method is applicable to a large number of SVM formulations regardless of the number of equality constraints involved. The effectiveness of our algorithm is demonstrated on a more difficult SVM variant in this respect, namely semi-parametric support vector regression.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Geometrical aspects of statistical learning theory

Hein, M.

Biologische Kybernetik, Darmstadt, Darmstadt, November 2005 (phdthesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Measuring Statistical Dependence with Hilbert-Schmidt Norms

Gretton, A., Bousquet, O., Smola, A., Schoelkopf, B.

In Algorithmic Learning Theory, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3734, pages: 63-78, (Editors: S Jain and H-U Simon and E Tomita), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 16th International Conference ALT, October 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose an independence criterion based on the eigenspectrum of covariance operators in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces (RKHSs), consisting of an empirical estimate of the Hilbert-Schmidt norm of the cross-covariance operator (we term this a Hilbert-Schmidt Independence Criterion, or HSIC). This approach has several advantages, compared with previous kernel-based independence criteria. First, the empirical estimate is simpler than any other kernel dependence test, and requires no user-defined regularisation. Second, there is a clearly defined population quantity which the empirical estimate approaches in the large sample limit, with exponential convergence guaranteed between the two: this ensures that independence tests based on {methodname} do not suffer from slow learning rates. Finally, we show in the context of independent component analysis (ICA) that the performance of HSIC is competitive with that of previously published kernel-based criteria, and of other recently published ICA methods.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Maximal Margin Classification for Metric Spaces

Hein, M., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Computer and System Sciences, 71(3):333-359, October 2005 (article)

Abstract
In order to apply the maximum margin method in arbitrary metric spaces, we suggest to embed the metric space into a Banach or Hilbert space and to perform linear classification in this space. We propose several embeddings and recall that an isometric embedding in a Banach space is always possible while an isometric embedding in a Hilbert space is only possible for certain metric spaces. As a result, we obtain a general maximum margin classification algorithm for arbitrary metric spaces (whose solution is approximated by an algorithm of Graepel. Interestingly enough, the embedding approach, when applied to a metric which can be embedded into a Hilbert space, yields the SVM algorithm, which emphasizes the fact that its solution depends on the metric and not on the kernel. Furthermore we give upper bounds of the capacity of the function classes corresponding to both embeddings in terms of Rademacher averages. Finally we compare the capacities of these function classes directly.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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An Analysis of the Anti-Learning Phenomenon for the Class Symmetric Polyhedron

Kowalczyk, A., Chapelle, O.

In Algorithmic Learning Theory: 16th International Conference, pages: 78-92, Algorithmic Learning Theory, October 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper deals with an unusual phenomenon where most machine learning algorithms yield good performance on the training set but systematically worse than random performance on the test set. This has been observed so far for some natural data sets and demonstrated for some synthetic data sets when the classification rule is learned from a small set of training samples drawn from some high dimensional space. The initial analysis presented in this paper shows that anti-learning is a property of data sets and is quite distinct from overfitting of a training data. Moreover, the analysis leads to a specification of some machine learning procedures which can overcome anti-learning and generate ma- chines able to classify training and test data consistently.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Selective integration of multiple biological data for supervised network inference

Kato, T., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 21(10):2488 , October 2005 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Assessing Approximate Inference for Binary Gaussian Process Classification

Kuss, M., Rasmussen, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 6, pages: 1679 , October 2005 (article)

Abstract
Gaussian process priors can be used to define flexible, probabilistic classification models. Unfortunately exact Bayesian inference is analytically intractable and various approximation techniques have been proposed. In this work we review and compare Laplace‘s method and Expectation Propagation for approximate Bayesian inference in the binary Gaussian process classification model. We present a comprehensive comparison of the approximations, their predictive performance and marginal likelihood estimates to results obtained by MCMC sampling. We explain theoretically and corroborate empirically the advantages of Expectation Propagation compared to Laplace‘s method.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Implicit Surfaces For Modelling Human Heads

Steinke, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen, September 2005 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A new methodology for robot controller design

Peters, J., Peters, J., Mistry, M., Udwadia, F.

In Proceedings of the 5th ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC‘05), 5, pages: 1067-1076 , ASME, New York, NY, USA, 5th ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference (IDETC-MSNDC), September 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gauss' principle of least constraint and its generalizations have provided a useful insights for the development of tracking controllers for mechanical systems [1]. Using this concept, we present a novel methodology for the design of a specific class of robot controllers. With our new framework, we demonstrate that well-known and also several novel nonlinear robot control laws can be derived from this generic framework, and show experimental verifications on a Sarcos Master Arm robot for some of these controllers. We believe that the suggested approach unifies and simplifies the design of optimal nonlinear control laws for robots obeying rigid body dynamics equations, both with or without external constraints, holonomic or nonholonomic constraints, with over-actuation or underactuation, as well as open-chain and closed-chain kinematics.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]