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2002


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The leave-one-out kernel

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M.

In Artificial Neural Networks -- ICANN 2002, 2415, pages: 727-732, LNCS, (Editors: Dorronsoro, J. R.), Artificial Neural Networks -- ICANN, 2002 (inproceedings)

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2002

PDF [BibTex]


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Localized Rademacher Complexities

Bartlett, P., Bousquet, O., Mendelson, S.

In Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 44-58, Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate the behaviour of global and local Rademacher averages. We present new error bounds which are based on the local averages and indicate how data-dependent local averages can be estimated without {it a priori} knowledge of the class at hand.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Film Cooling: A Comparative Study of Different Heaterfoil Configurations for Liquid Crystals Experiments

Vogel, G., Graf, ABA., Weigand, B.

In ASME TURBO EXPO 2002, Amsterdam, GT-2002-30552, ASME TURBO EXPO, Amsterdam, 2002 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Some Local Measures of Complexity of Convex Hulls and Generalization Bounds

Bousquet, O., Koltchinskii, V., Panchenko, D.

In Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate measures of complexity of function classes based on continuity moduli of Gaussian and Rademacher processes. For Gaussian processes, we obtain bounds on the continuity modulus on the convex hull of a function class in terms of the same quantity for the class itself. We also obtain new bounds on generalization error in terms of localized Rademacher complexities. This allows us to prove new results about generalization performance for convex hulls in terms of characteristics of the base class. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple proof of some of the known bounds on the entropy of convex hulls.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A kernel approach for learning from almost orthogonal patterns

Schölkopf, B., Weston, J., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

In Principles of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2430/2431, pages: 511-528, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: T Elomaa and H Mannila and H Toivonen), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 13th European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML) and 6th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (PKDD'2002), 2002 (inproceedings)

PostScript DOI [BibTex]

PostScript DOI [BibTex]


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Infinite Mixtures of Gaussian Process Experts

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In (Editors: Dietterich, Thomas G.; Becker, Suzanna; Ghahramani, Zoubin), 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an extension to the Mixture of Experts (ME) model, where the individual experts are Gaussian Process (GP) regression models. Using a input-dependent adaptation of the Dirichlet Process, we implement a gating network for an infinite number of Experts. Inference in this model may be done efficiently using a Markov Chain relying on Gibbs sampling. The model allows the effective covariance function to vary with the inputs, and may handle large datasets -- thus potentially overcoming two of the biggest hurdles with GP models. Simulations show the viability of this approach.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for RNA sequence data analysis

Kin, T., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

In Genome Informatics 2002, pages: 112-122, (Editors: Lathtop, R. H.; Nakai, K.; Miyano, S.; Takagi, T.; Kanehisa, M.), Genome Informatics, 2002, (Best Paper Award) (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Luminance Artifacts on CRT Displays

Wichmann, F.

In IEEE Visualization, pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R.; Gross, M.; Joy, K. I.), IEEE Visualization, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most visualization panels today are still built around cathode-ray tubes (CRTs), certainly on personal desktops at work and at home. Whilst capable of producing pleasing images for common applications ranging from email writing to TV and DVD presentation, it is as well to note that there are a number of nonlinear transformations between input (voltage) and output (luminance) which distort the digital and/or analogue images send to a CRT. Some of them are input-independent and hence easy to fix, e.g. gamma correction, but others, such as pixel interactions, depend on the content of the input stimulus and are thus harder to compensate for. CRT-induced image distortions cause problems not only in basic vision research but also for applications where image fidelity is critical, most notably in medicine (digitization of X-ray images for diagnostic purposes) and in forms of online commerce, such as the online sale of images, where the image must be reproduced on some output device which will not have the same transfer function as the customer's CRT. I will present measurements from a number of CRTs and illustrate how some of their shortcomings may be problematic for the aforementioned applications.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1997


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The view-graph approach to visual navigation and spatial memory

Mallot, H., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN ’97, pages: 751-756, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes a purely visual navigation scheme based on two elementary mechanisms (piloting and guidance) and a graph structure combining individual navigation steps controlled by these mechanisms. In robot experiments in real environments, both mechanisms have been tested, piloting in an open environment and guidance in a maze with restricted movement opportunities. The results indicate that navigation and path planning can be brought about with these simple mechanisms. We argue that the graph of local views (snapshots) is a general and biologically plausible means of representing space and integrating the various mechanisms of map behaviour.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

1997

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Predicting time series with support vector machines

Müller, K., Smola, A., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Kohlmorgen, J., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN’97, pages: 999-1004, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , C.J.C. Burges, A.J. Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks , October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Machines are used for time series prediction and compared to radial basis function networks. We make use of two different cost functions for Support Vectors: training with (i) an e insensitive loss and (ii) Huber's robust loss function and discuss how to choose the regularization parameters in these models. Two applications are considered: data from (a) a noisy (normal and uniform noise) Mackey Glass equation and (b) the Santa Fe competition (set D). In both cases Support Vector Machines show an excellent performance. In case (b) the Support Vector approach improves the best known result on the benchmark by a factor of 29%.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Predicting time series with support vectur machines

Müller, K., Smola, A., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Kohlmorgen, J., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial neural networks: ICANN ’97, pages: 999-1004, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks , October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Machines are used for time series prediction and compared to radial basis function networks. We make use of two different cost functions for Support Vectors: training with (i) an e insensitive loss and (ii) Huber's robust loss function and discuss how to choose the regularization parameters in these models. Two applications are considered: data from (a) a noisy (normal and uniform noise) Mackey Glass equation and (b) the Santa Fe competition (set D). In both cases Support Vector Machines show an excellent performance. In case (b) the Support Vector approach improves the best known result on the benchmark by a factor of 29%.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel principal component analysis

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Artificial neural networks: ICANN ’97, LNCS, vol. 1327, pages: 583-588, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A new method for performing a nonlinear form of Principal Component Analysis is proposed. By the use of integral operator kernel functions, one can efficiently compute principal components in highdimensional feature spaces, related to input space by some nonlinear map; for instance the space of all possible d-pixel products in images. We give the derivation of the method and present experimental results on polynomial feature extraction for pattern recognition.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Homing by parameterized scene matching

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Artificial Life, (Eds.) P. Husbands, I. Harvey. MIT Press, Cambridge 1997, pages: 236-245, (Editors: P Husbands and I Harvey), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 4th European Conference on Artificial Life (ECAL97), July 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In visual homing tasks, animals as well as robots can compute their movements from the current view and a snapshot taken at a home position. Solving this problem exactly would require knowledge about the distances to visible landmarks, information, which is not directly available to passive vision systems. We propose a homing scheme that dispenses with accurate distance information by using parameterized disparity fields. These are obtained from an approximation that incorporates prior knowledge about perspective distortions of the visual environment. A mathematical analysis proves that the approximation does not prevent the scheme from approaching the goal with arbitrary accuracy. Mobile robot experiments are used to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Improving the accuracy and speed of support vector learning machines

Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9, pages: 375-381, (Editors: M Mozer and MJ Jordan and T Petsche), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Tenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), May 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Learning Machines (SVM) are finding application in pattern recognition, regression estimation, and operator inversion for illposed problems . Against this very general backdrop any methods for improving the generalization performance, or for improving the speed in test phase of SVMs are of increasing interest. In this paper we combine two such techniques on a pattern recognition problem The method for improving generalization performance the "virtual support vector" method does so by incorporating known invariances of the problem This method achieves a drop in the error rate on 10.000 NIST test digit images of 1,4 % to 1 %. The method for improving the speed (the "reduced set" method) does so by approximating the support vector decision surface. We apply this method to achieve a factor of fifty speedup in test phase over the virtual support vector machine The combined approach yields a machine which is both 22 times faster than the original machine, and which has better generalization performance achieving 1,1 % error . The virtual support vector method is applicable to any SVM problem with known invariances The reduced set method is applicable to any support vector machine .

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Georg, P., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 1st Intl. Conf. on Autonomous Agents, pages: 138-147, (Editors: Johnson, W.L.), ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, First International Conference on Autonomous Agents (AGENTS '97), Febuary 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a parsimonious representation of an open environment. Using simple exploration behaviours, our system constructs a graph of appropriately chosen views. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. Simulations and robot experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Support vector learning

Schölkopf, B.

pages: 173, Oldenbourg, München, Germany, 1997, Zugl.: Berlin, Techn. Univ., Diss., 1997 (book)

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]