Header logo is ei


2002


no image
A kernel approach for learning from almost orthogonal patterns

Schölkopf, B., Weston, J., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

In Principles of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2430/2431, pages: 511-528, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: T Elomaa and H Mannila and H Toivonen), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 13th European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML) and 6th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (PKDD'2002), 2002 (inproceedings)

PostScript DOI [BibTex]

2002

PostScript DOI [BibTex]


no image
Optimal linear estimation of self-motion - a real-world test of a model of fly tangential neurons

Franz, MO.

SAB 02 Workshop, Robotics as theoretical biology, 7th meeting of the International Society for Simulation of Adaptive Behaviour (SAB), (Editors: Prescott, T.; Webb, B.), 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion (see example in Fig.1). We examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor that can be moved along three translational and one rotational degree of freedom. The experiments indicate that the proposed approach yields accurate results for rotation estimates, independently of the current translation and scene layout. Translation estimates, however, turned out to be sensitive to simultaneous rotation and to the particular distance distribution of the scene. The gantry experiments confirm that the receptive field organization of the tangential neurons allows them, as an ensemble, to extract self-motion from the optic flow.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Infinite Mixtures of Gaussian Process Experts

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In (Editors: Dietterich, Thomas G.; Becker, Suzanna; Ghahramani, Zoubin), 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an extension to the Mixture of Experts (ME) model, where the individual experts are Gaussian Process (GP) regression models. Using a input-dependent adaptation of the Dirichlet Process, we implement a gating network for an infinite number of Experts. Inference in this model may be done efficiently using a Markov Chain relying on Gibbs sampling. The model allows the effective covariance function to vary with the inputs, and may handle large datasets -- thus potentially overcoming two of the biggest hurdles with GP models. Simulations show the viability of this approach.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


no image
Marginalized kernels for RNA sequence data analysis

Kin, T., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

In Genome Informatics 2002, pages: 112-122, (Editors: Lathtop, R. H.; Nakai, K.; Miyano, S.; Takagi, T.; Kanehisa, M.), Genome Informatics, 2002, (Best Paper Award) (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Luminance Artifacts on CRT Displays

Wichmann, F.

In IEEE Visualization, pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R.; Gross, M.; Joy, K. I.), IEEE Visualization, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most visualization panels today are still built around cathode-ray tubes (CRTs), certainly on personal desktops at work and at home. Whilst capable of producing pleasing images for common applications ranging from email writing to TV and DVD presentation, it is as well to note that there are a number of nonlinear transformations between input (voltage) and output (luminance) which distort the digital and/or analogue images send to a CRT. Some of them are input-independent and hence easy to fix, e.g. gamma correction, but others, such as pixel interactions, depend on the content of the input stimulus and are thus harder to compensate for. CRT-induced image distortions cause problems not only in basic vision research but also for applications where image fidelity is critical, most notably in medicine (digitization of X-ray images for diagnostic purposes) and in forms of online commerce, such as the online sale of images, where the image must be reproduced on some output device which will not have the same transfer function as the customer's CRT. I will present measurements from a number of CRTs and illustrate how some of their shortcomings may be problematic for the aforementioned applications.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1998


no image
Navigation mit Schnappschüssen

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H., Zell, A.

In Mustererkennung 1998, pages: 421-428, (Editors: P Levi and R-J Ahlers and F May and M Schanz), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 20th DAGM-Symposium, October 1998 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Es wird ein biologisch inspirierter Algorithmus vorgestellt, mit dem sich ein Ort wiederfinden l{\"a}sst, an dem vorher eine 360-Grad-Ansicht der Umgebung aufgenommen wurde. Die Zielrichtung wird aus der Verschiebung der Bildposition der umgebenden Landmarken im Vergleich zum Schnappschuss berechnet. Die Konvergenzeigenschaften des Algorithmus werden mathematisch untersucht und auf mobilen Robotern getestet.

PDF Web [BibTex]

1998

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Prior knowledge in support vector kernels

Schölkopf, B., Simard, P., Smola, A., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 640-646 , (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla ), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Eleventh Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
From regularization operators to support vector kernels

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 10, pages: 343-349, (Editors: M Jordan and M Kearns and S Solla), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 11th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing (NIPS), June 1998 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Qualitative Modeling for Data Miner’s Requirements

Shin, H., Jhee, W.

In Proc. of the Korean Management Information Systems, pages: 65-73, Conference on the Korean Management Information Systems, April 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Übersicht durch Übersehen

Schölkopf, B.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung , Wissenschaftsbeilage, March 1998 (misc)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Masking by plaid patterns: effects of presentation time and mask contrast

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

pages: 115, 1. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 98), February 1998 (poster)

Abstract
Most current models of early spatial vision comprise of sets of orientation- and spatial-frequency selective filters with our without limited non-linear interactions amongst different subsets of the filters. The performance of human observers and of such models for human spatial vision were compared in experiments using maskers with two spatial frequencies (plaid masks). The detectability of horizontally orientated sinusoidal signals at 3.02 c/deg was measured in standard 2AFC-tasks in the presence of plaid patterns with two-components at the same spatial frequency as the signal but at different orientations (+/- 15, 30, 45, and 75 deg from the signal) and with varying contrasts (1.0, 6.25 and 25.0% contrast). In addition, the temporal envelope of the stimulus presentation was either a rectangular pulse of 19.7 msec duration, or a temporal Hanning window of 1497 msec.Threshold elevation varied with plaid component orientation, peaked +/- 30 deg from the signal where nearly a log unit threshold elevation for the 25.0% contrast plaid was observed. For plaids with 1.0% contrast we observed significant facilitation even with plaids whose components were 75 deg from that of the signal. Elevation factors were somewhat lower for the short stimulus presentation time but were still significant (up to a factor of 5 or 6). Despite of the simple nature of the stimuli employed in this study-sinusoidal signal and plaid masks comprised of only two sinusoids-none of the current models of early spatial vision can fully account for all the data gathered.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Fast approximation of support vector kernel expansions, and an interpretation of clustering as approximation in feature spaces.

Schölkopf, B., Knirsch, P., Smola, A., Burges, C.

In Mustererkennung 1998, pages: 125-132, Informatik aktuell, (Editors: P Levi and M Schanz and R-J Ahlers and F May), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 20th DAGM-Symposium, 1998 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Kernel-based learning methods provide their solutions as expansions in terms of a kernel. We consider the problem of reducing the computational complexity of evaluating these expansions by approximating them using fewer terms. As a by-product, we point out a connection between clustering and approximation in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces generated by a particular class of kernels.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel PCA pattern reconstruction via approximate pre-images.

Schölkopf, B., Mika, S., Smola, A., Rätsch, G., Müller, K.

In 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, pages: 147-152, Perspectives in Neural Computing, (Editors: L Niklasson and M Boden and T Ziemke), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A bootstrap method for testing hypotheses concerning psychometric functions

Hill, N., Wichmann, F.

1998 (poster)

Abstract
Whenever psychometric functions are used to evaluate human performance on some task, it is valuable to examine not only the threshold and slope values estimated from the original data, but also the expected variability in those measures. This allows psychometric functions obtained in two experimental conditions to be compared statistically. We present a method for estimating the variability of thresholds and slopes of psychometric functions. This involves a maximum-likelihood fit to the data using a three-parameter mathematical function, followed by Monte Carlo simulation using the first fit as a generating function for the simulations. The variability of the function's parameters can then be estimated (as shown by Maloney, 1990), as can the variability of the threshold value (Foster & Bischof, 1997). We will show how a simple development of this procedure can be used to test the significance of differences between (a) the thresholds, and (b) the slopes of two psychometric functions. Further, our method can be used to assess the assumptions underlying the original fit, by examining how goodness-of-fit differs in simulation from its original value. In this way data sets can be identified as being either too noisy to be generated by a binomial observer, or significantly "too good to be true." All software is written in MATLAB and is therefore compatible across platforms, with the option of accelerating performance using MATLAB's plug-in binaries, or "MEX" files.

[BibTex]


no image
Convex Cost Functions for Support Vector Regression

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

In 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, pages: 99-104, Perspectives in Neural Computing, (Editors: L Niklasson and M Boden and T Ziemke), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Nonlinearities and the pedestal effect

Wichmann, F., Henning, G., Ploghaus, A.

Perception, 27, pages: S86, 1998 (poster)

Abstract
Psychophysical and physiological evidence suggests that luminance patterns are independently analysed in "channels" responding to different bands of spatial frequency. There are, however, interactions among stimuli falling well outside the usual estimates of channels' bandwidths (Henning, Hertz, and Broadbent, (1975). Vision Res., 15, 887-899). We examined whether the masking results of Henning et al. are consistent with independent channels. We postulated, before the channels, a point non-linearity which would introduce distortion products that might produce the observed interactions between stimuli two octaves apart in spatial frequency. Standard 2-AFC masking experiments determined whether possible distortion products of a 4.185 c/deg masking sinusoid revealed their presence through effects on the detection of a sinusoidal signal at the frequency of the second harmonic of the masker-8.37 c/deg. The signal and masker were horizontally orientated and the signal was in-phase, out-of-phase, or in quadrature with the putative second-order distortion product of the masker. Significant interactions between signal and masker were observed: for a wide range of masker contrasts, signal detection was facilitated by the masking stimulus. However, the shapes of the functions relating detection performance to masker contrast, as well as the effects of relative phase, were inconsistent with the notion that distortion products were responsible for the interactions observed.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Support vector regression with automatic accuracy control.

Schölkopf, B., Bartlett, P., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

In ICANN'98, pages: 111-116, Perspectives in Neural Computing, (Editors: L Niklasson and M Boden and T Ziemke), Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN'98), 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
General cost functions for support vector regression.

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

In Ninth Australian Conference on Neural Networks, pages: 79-83, (Editors: T Downs and M Frean and M Gallagher), 9th Australian Conference on Neural Networks (ACNN'98), 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Asymptotically optimal choice of varepsilon-loss for support vector machines.

Smola, A., Murata, N., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

In 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, pages: 105-110, Perspectives in Neural Computing, (Editors: L Niklasson and M Boden and T Ziemke), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 8th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1998 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1995


no image
View-based cognitive map learning by an autonomous robot

Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H., Georg, P., Schölkopf, B., Yasuhara, K.

In Proceedings International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, vol. 2, pages: 381-386, (Editors: Fogelman-Soulié, F.), EC2, Paris, France, Conférence Internationale sur les Réseaux de Neurones Artificiels (ICANN '95), October 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents a view-based approach to map learning and navigation in mazes. By means of graph theory we have shown that the view-graph is a sufficient representation for map behaviour such as path planning. A neural network for unsupervised learning of the view-graph from sequences of views is constructed. We use a modified Kohonen (1988) learning rule that transforms temporal sequence (rather than featural similarity) into connectedness. In the main part of the paper, we present a robot implementation of the scheme. The results show that the proposed network is able to support map behaviour in simple environments.

PDF [BibTex]

1995

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Extracting support data for a given task

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In First International Conference on Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (KDD-95), pages: 252-257, (Editors: UM Fayyad and R Uthurusamy), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, August 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We report a novel possibility for extracting a small subset of a data base which contains all the information necessary to solve a given classification task: using the Support Vector Algorithm to train three different types of handwritten digit classifiers, we observed that these types of classifiers construct their decision surface from strongly overlapping small (k: 4%) subsets of the data base. This finding opens up the possibiiity of compressing data bases significantly by disposing of the data which is not important for the solution of a given task. In addition, we show that the theory allows us to predict the classifier that will have the best generalization ability, based solely on performance on the training set and characteristics of the learning machines. This finding is important for cases where the amount of available data is limited.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

[BibTex]