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2002


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Subspace information criterion for non-quadratic regularizers – model selection for sparse regressors

Tsuda, K., Sugiyama, M., Müller, K.

IEEE Trans Neural Networks, 13(1):70-80, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

2002

PDF [BibTex]


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Modeling splicing sites with pairwise correlations

Arita, M., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 2):27-34, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Perfusion Quantification using Gaussian Process Deconvolution

Andersen, IK., Szymkowiak, A., Rasmussen, CE., Hanson, LG., Marstrand, JR., Larsson, HBW., Hansen, LK.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, (48):351-361, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The quantification of perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging requires deconvolution to obtain the residual impulse-response function (IRF). Here, a method using a Gaussian process for deconvolution, GPD, is proposed. The fact that the IRF is smooth is incorporated as a constraint in the method. The GPD method, which automatically estimates the noise level in each voxel, has the advantage that model parameters are optimized automatically. The GPD is compared to singular value decomposition (SVD) using a common threshold for the singular values and to SVD using a threshold optimized according to the noise level in each voxel. The comparison is carried out using artificial data as well as using data from healthy volunteers. It is shown that GPD is comparable to SVD variable optimized threshold when determining the maximum of the IRF, which is directly related to the perfusion. GPD provides a better estimate of the entire IRF. As the signal to noise ratio increases or the time resolution of the measurements increases, GPD is shown to be superior to SVD. This is also found for large distribution volumes.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Tracking a Small Set of Experts by Mixing Past Posteriors

Bousquet, O., Warmuth, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3, pages: 363-396, (Editors: Long, P.), 2002 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we examine on-line learning problems in which the target concept is allowed to change over time. In each trial a master algorithm receives predictions from a large set of n experts. Its goal is to predict almost as well as the best sequence of such experts chosen off-line by partitioning the training sequence into k+1 sections and then choosing the best expert for each section. We build on methods developed by Herbster and Warmuth and consider an open problem posed by Freund where the experts in the best partition are from a small pool of size m. Since k >> m, the best expert shifts back and forth between the experts of the small pool. We propose algorithms that solve this open problem by mixing the past posteriors maintained by the master algorithm. We relate the number of bits needed for encoding the best partition to the loss bounds of the algorithms. Instead of paying log n for choosing the best expert in each section we first pay log (n choose m) bits in the bounds for identifying the pool of m experts and then log m bits per new section. In the bounds we also pay twice for encoding the boundaries of the sections.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A femoral arteriovenous shunt facilitates arterial whole blood sampling in animals

Weber, B., Burger, C., Biro, P., Buck, A.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging, 29, pages: 319-323, 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with pulse-trains in pink noise

Henning, G., Bird, C., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1259-1266, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Detection performance was measured with sinusoidal and pulse-train gratings. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train, or line gratings, contained at least 8 harmonics all at equal contrast, they were no more detectable than their most detectable component. The addition of broadband pink noise designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train made the pulse train about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with a pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not affect the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that obtained with its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Optimal linear estimation of self-motion - a real-world test of a model of fly tangential neurons

Franz, MO.

SAB 02 Workshop, Robotics as theoretical biology, 7th meeting of the International Society for Simulation of Adaptive Behaviour (SAB), (Editors: Prescott, T.; Webb, B.), 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion (see example in Fig.1). We examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor that can be moved along three translational and one rotational degree of freedom. The experiments indicate that the proposed approach yields accurate results for rotation estimates, independently of the current translation and scene layout. Translation estimates, however, turned out to be sensitive to simultaneous rotation and to the particular distance distribution of the scene. The gantry experiments confirm that the receptive field organization of the tangential neurons allows them, as an ensemble, to extract self-motion from the optic flow.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Choosing Multiple Parameters for Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bousquet, O., Mukherjee, S.

Machine Learning, 46(1):131-159, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The problem of automatically tuning multiple parameters for pattern recognition Support Vector Machines (SVM) is considered. This is done by minimizing some estimates of the generalization error of SVMs using a gradient descent algorithm over the set of parameters. Usual methods for choosing parameters, based on exhaustive search become intractable as soon as the number of parameters exceeds two. Some experimental results assess the feasibility of our approach for a large number of parameters (more than 100) and demonstrate an improvement of generalization performance.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

1995


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View-Based Cognitive Mapping and Path Planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

Adaptive Behavior, 3(3):311-348, January 1995 (article)

Abstract
This article presents a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph, whose nodes correspond to the views whereas the labeled edges represent the movements leading from one view to another. By means of a graph theoretical reconstruction method, the view graph is shown to carry complete information on the topological and directional structure of the maze. Path planning can be carried out directly in the view graph without actually performing this reconstruction. A neural network is presented that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. It is based on an unsupervised competitive learning rule translating temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be encountered next, improving the view-recognition performance. Numerical simulations illustrate the network's ability for path planning and the recognition of views degraded by random noise. The results are compared to findings of behavioral neuroscience.

Web DOI [BibTex]

1995

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Suppression and creation of chaos in a periodically forced Lorenz system.

Franz, MO., Zhang, MH.

Physical Review, E 52, pages: 3558-3565, 1995 (article)

Abstract
Periodic forcing is introduced into the Lorenz model to study the effects of time-dependent forcing on the behavior of the system. Such a nonautonomous system stays dissipative and has a bounded attracting set which all trajectories finally enter. The possible kinds of attracting sets are restricted to periodic orbits and strange attractors. A large-scale survey of parameter space shows that periodic forcing has mainly three effects in the Lorenz system depending on the forcing frequency: (i) Fixed points are replaced by oscillations around them; (ii) resonant periodic orbits are created both in the stable and the chaotic region; (iii) chaos is created in the stable region near the resonance frequency and in periodic windows. A comparison to other studies shows that part of this behavior has been observed in simulations of higher truncations and real world experiments. Since very small modulations can already have a considerable effect, this suggests that periodic processes such as annual or diurnal cycles should not be omitted even in simple climate models.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

[BibTex]