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2004


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Learning Depth

Sinz, F., Franz, MO.

pages: 69, (Editors: H.H.Bülthoff, H.A.Mallot, R.Ulrich,F.A.Wichmann), 7th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), February 2004 (poster)

Abstract
The depth of a point in space can be estimated by observing its image position from two different viewpoints. The classical approach to stereo vision calculates depth from the two projection equations which together form a stereocamera model. An unavoidable preparatory work for this solution is a calibration procedure, i.e., estimating the external (position and orientation) and internal (focal length, lens distortions etc.) parameters of each camera from a set of points with known spatial position and their corresponding image positions. This is normally done by iteratively linearizing the single camera models and reestimating their parameters according to the error on the known datapoints. The advantage of the classical method is the maximal usage of prior knowledge about the underlying physical processes and the explicit estimation of meaningful model parameters such as focal length or camera position in space. However, the approach neglects the nonlinear nature of the problem such that the results critically depend on the choice of the initial values for the parameters. In this study, we approach the depth estimation problem from a different point of view by applying generic machine learning algorithms to learn the mapping from image coordinates to spatial position. These algorithms do not require any domain knowledge and are able to learn nonlinear functions by mapping the inputs into a higher-dimensional space. Compared to classical calibration, machine learning methods give a direct solution to the depth estimation problem which means that the values of the stereocamera parameters cannot be extracted from the learned mapping. On the poster, we compare the performance of classical camera calibration to that of different machine learning algorithms such as kernel ridge regression, gaussian processes and support vector regression. Our results indicate that generic learning approaches can lead to higher depth accuracies than classical calibration although no domain knowledge is used.

PDF Web [BibTex]

2004

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Experimentally optimal v in support vector regression for different noise models and parameter settings

Chalimourda, A., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

Neural Networks, 17(1):127-141, January 2004 (article)

Abstract
In Support Vector (SV) regression, a parameter ν controls the number of Support Vectors and the number of points that come to lie outside of the so-called var epsilon-insensitive tube. For various noise models and SV parameter settings, we experimentally determine the values of ν that lead to the lowest generalization error. We find good agreement with the values that had previously been predicted by a theoretical argument based on the asymptotic efficiency of a simplified model of SV regression. As a side effect of the experiments, valuable information about the generalization behavior of the remaining SVM parameters and their dependencies is gained. The experimental findings are valid even for complex ‘real-world’ data sets. Based on our results on the role of the ν-SVM parameters, we discuss various model selection methods.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Constant infusion H215O PET and acetazolamide challenge in the assessment of the cerebral perfusion status

Weber, B., Westera, G., Treyer, V., Burger, C., Kahn, N., Buck, A.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, (45):1344-1349, 2004 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Local Alignment Kernels for Biological Sequences

Vert, J., Saigo, H., Akutsu, T.

In Kernel Methods in Computational Biology, pages: 131-153, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA,, 2004 (inbook)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Protein ranking: from local to global structure in the protein similarity network

Weston, J., Elisseeff, A., Zhou, D., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 101(17):6559-6563, 2004 (article)

Abstract
Biologists regularly search databases of DNA or protein sequences for evolutionary or functional relationships to a given query sequence. We describe a ranking algorithm that exploits the entire network structure of similarity relationships among proteins in a sequence database by performing a diffusion operation on a pre-computed, weighted network. The resulting ranking algorithm, evaluated using a human-curated database of protein structures, is efficient and provides significantly better rankings than a local network search algorithm such as PSI-BLAST.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes in Machine Learning

Rasmussen, CE.

In 3176, pages: 63-71, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: Bousquet, O., U. von Luxburg and G. Rätsch), Springer, Heidelberg, 2004, Copyright by Springer (inbook)

Abstract
We give a basic introduction to Gaussian Process regression models. We focus on understanding the role of the stochastic process and how it is used to define a distribution over functions. We present the simple equations for incorporating training data and examine how to learn the hyperparameters using the marginal likelihood. We explain the practical advantages of Gaussian Process and end with conclusions and a look at the current trends in GP work.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Neural mechanisms underlying control of a Brain-Computer-Interface (BCI): Simultaneous recording of bold-response and EEG

Hinterberger, T., Wilhelm, B., Veit, R., Weiskopf, N., Lal, TN., Birbaumer, N.

2004 (poster)

Abstract
Brain computer interfaces (BCI) enable humans or animals to communicate or activate external devices without muscle activity using electric brain signals. The BCI Thought Translation Device (TTD) uses learned regulation of slow cortical potentials (SCPs), a skill most people and paralyzed patients can acquire with training periods of several hours up to months. The neurophysiological mechanisms and anatomical sources of SCPs and other event-related brain macro-potentials are well understood, but the neural mechanisms underlying learning of the self-regulation skill for BCI-use are unknown. To uncover the relevant areas of brain activation during regulation of SCPs, the TTD was combined with functional MRI and EEG was recorded inside the MRI scanner in twelve healthy participants who have learned to regulate their SCP with feedback and reinforcement. The results demonstrate activation of specific brain areas during execution of the brain regulation skill: successf! ul control of cortical positivity allowing a person to activate an external device was closely related to an increase of BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) response in the basal ganglia and frontal premotor deactivation indicating learned regulation of a cortical-striatal loop responsible for local excitation thresholds of cortical assemblies. The data suggest that human users of a BCI learn the regulation of cortical excitation thresholds of large neuronal assemblies as a prerequisite of direct brain communication: the learning of this skill depends critically on an intact and flexible interaction between these cortico-basal ganglia-circuits. Supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) and the National Institute of Health (NIH).

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Asymptotic Properties of the Fisher Kernel

Tsuda, K., Akaho, S., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 16(1):115-137, 2004 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Some observations on the effects of slant and texture type on slant-from-texture

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Vision Research, 44(13):1511-1535, 2004 (article)

Abstract
We measure the performance of five subjects in a slant-discrimination task for differently textured planes. As textures we used uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, circles (polka dots), Voronoi tessellations, plaids, 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a leopard skin-like texture. Our results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) Thus, following from (1), cases of “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular orientation. (3) For orientations sufficiently slanted, the different textures do not elicit major differences in performance, (4) while for orientations closer to the vertical plane there are marked differences between them. (5) These differences allow a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness”– that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the plane. Polka dots tend to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst. Two additional experiments were conducted to test the generality of the obtained rank-order. First, the tilt of the planes was rotated to break the axis of gravity present in the original discrimination experiment. Second, the task was changed to a slant report task via probe adjustment. The results of both control experiments confirmed the texture-based rank-order previously obtained. We comment on the importance of these results for depth perception research in general, and in particular the implications our results have for studies of cue combination (sensor fusion) using texture as one of the cues involved.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Masking by plaid patterns revisited

Wichmann, F.

Experimentelle Psychologie. Beitr{\"a}ge zur 46. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 46, pages: 285, 2004 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Protein homology detection using string alignment kernels

Saigo, H., Vert, J., Ueda, N., Akutsu, T.

Bioinformatics, 20(11):1682-1689, 2004 (article)

Abstract
Remote homology detection between protein sequences is a central problem in computational biology. Discriminative methods involving support vector machines (SVM) are currently the most effective methods for the problem of superfamily recognition in the SCOP database. The performance of SVMs depend critically on the kernel function used to quantify the similarity between sequences. We propose new kernels for strings adapted to biological sequences, which we call local alignment kernels. These kernels measure the similarity between two sequences by summing up scores obtained from local alignments with gaps of the sequences. When tested in combination with SVM on their ability to recognize SCOP superfamilies on a benchmark dataset, the new kernels outperform state-of-the art methods for remote homology detection.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Minimizing the Cross Validation Error to Mix Kernel Matrices of Heterogeneous Biological Data

Tsuda, K., Uda, S., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Neural Processing Letters, 19, pages: 63-72, 2004 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Tutorial on Support Vector Regression

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

Statistics and Computing, 14(3):199-222, 2004 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Protein Classification via Kernel Matrix Completion

Kin, T., Kato, T., Tsuda, K.

In pages: 261-274, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J.P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA; USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Early visual processing—data, theory, models

Wichmann, F.

Experimentelle Psychologie. Beitr{\"a}ge zur 46. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 46, pages: 24, 2004 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian analysis of the Scatterometer Wind Retrieval Inverse Problem: Some New Approaches

Cornford, D., Csato, L., Evans, D., Opper, M.

Journal of the Royal Statistical Society B, 66, pages: 1-17, 3, 2004 (article)

Abstract
The retrieval of wind vectors from satellite scatterometer observations is a non-linear inverse problem.A common approach to solving inverse problems is to adopt a Bayesian framework and to infer the posterior distribution of the parameters of interest given the observations by using a likelihood model relating the observations to the parameters, and a prior distribution over the parameters.We show how Gaussian process priors can be used efficiently with a variety of likelihood models, using local forward (observation) models and direct inverse models for the scatterometer.We present an enhanced Markov chain Monte Carlo method to sample from the resulting multimodal posterior distribution.We go on to show how the computational complexity of the inference can be controlled by using a sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm for estimation with Gaussian processes.This helps to overcome the most serious barrier to the use of probabilistic, Gaussian process methods in remote sensing inverse problems, which is the prohibitively large size of the data sets.We contrast the sampling results with the approximations that are found by using the sparse, sequential Bayes algorithm.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines Using Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

International Journal on Artificial Intelligence Tools (Special Issue on Selected Papers from the 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with Artificial Intelligence 2003), 13(4):791-800, 2004 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Introduction to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O., Boucheron, S., Lugosi, G.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3176, pages: 169-207, (Editors: Bousquet, O., U. von Luxburg and G. Rätsch), Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Primer on Kernel Methods

Vert, J., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Kernel Methods in Computational Biology, pages: 35-70, (Editors: B Schölkopf and K Tsuda and JP Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Optical Imaging of the Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Cerebral Blood Flow and Oxidative Metabolism in the Rat Barrel Cortex

Weber, B., Burger, C., Wyss, M., von Schulthess, G., Scheffold, F., Buck, A.

European Journal of Neuroscience, 20(10):2664-2670, 2004 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Phenotypic Characterization of Human Chondrocyte Cell Line C-20/A4: A Comparison between Monolayer and Alginate Suspension Culture

Finger, F., Schorle, C., Söder, S., Zien, A., Goldring, M., Aigner, T.

Cells Tissues Organs, 178(2):65-77, 2004 (article)

Abstract
DNA microarray analysis was used to investigate the molecular phenotype of one of the first human chondrocyte cell lines, C-20/A4, derived from juvenile costal chondrocytes by immortalization with origin-defective simian virus 40 large T antigen. Clontech Human Cancer Arrays 1.2 and quantitative PCR were used to examine gene expression profiles of C-20/A4 cells cultured in the presence of serum in monolayer and alginate beads. In monolayer cultures, genes involved in cell proliferation were strongly upregulated compared to those expressed by human adult articular chondrocytes in primary culture. Of the cell cycle-regulated genes, only two, the CDK regulatory subunit and histone H4, were downregulated after culture in alginate beads, consistent with the ability of these cells to proliferate in suspension culture. In contrast, the expression of several genes that are involved in pericellular matrix formation, including MMP-14, COL6A1, fibronectin, biglycan and decorin, was upregulated when the C-20/A4 cells were transferred to suspension culture in alginate. Also, nexin-1, vimentin, and IGFBP-3, which are known to be expressed by primary chondrocytes, were differentially expressed in our study. Consistent with the proliferative phenotype of this cell line, few genes involved in matrix synthesis and turnover were highly expressed in the presence of serum. These results indicate that immortalized chondrocyte cell lines, rather than substituting for primary chondrocytes, may serve as models for extending findings on chondrocyte function not achievable by the use of primary chondrocytes.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and their Potential Use in Signal Processing

Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O.

IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, (Special issue on Signal Processing for Mining), 2004 (article) Accepted

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Concentration Inequalities

Boucheron, S., Lugosi, G., Bousquet, O.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence 3176, pages: 208-240, (Editors: Bousquet, O., U. von Luxburg and G. Rätsch), Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernels for graphs

Kashima, H., Tsuda, K., Inokuchi, A.

In pages: 155-170, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J.P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA; USA, 2004 (inbook)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A primer on molecular biology

Zien, A.

In pages: 3-34, (Editors: Schoelkopf, B., K. Tsuda and J. P. Vert), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2004 (inbook)

Abstract
Modern molecular biology provides a rich source of challenging machine learning problems. This tutorial chapter aims to provide the necessary biological background knowledge required to communicate with biologists and to understand and properly formalize a number of most interesting problems in this application domain. The largest part of the chapter (its first section) is devoted to the cell as the basic unit of life. Four aspects of cells are reviewed in sequence: (1) the molecules that cells make use of (above all, proteins, RNA, and DNA); (2) the spatial organization of cells (``compartmentalization''); (3) the way cells produce proteins (``protein expression''); and (4) cellular communication and evolution (of cells and organisms). In the second section, an overview is provided of the most frequent measurement technologies, data types, and data sources. Finally, important open problems in the analysis of these data (bioinformatics challenges) are briefly outlined.

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Implicit Wiener series for capturing higher-order interactions in images

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

Sensory coding and the natural environment, (Editors: Olshausen, B.A. and M. Lewicki), 2004 (poster)

Abstract
The information about the objects in an image is almost exclusively described by the higher-order interactions of its pixels. The Wiener series is one of the standard methods to systematically characterize these interactions. However, the classical estimation method of the Wiener expansion coefficients via cross-correlation suffers from severe problems that prevent its application to high-dimensional and strongly nonlinear signals such as images. We propose an estimation method based on regression in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space that overcomes these problems using polynomial kernels as known from Support Vector Machines and other kernel-based methods. Numerical experiments show performance advantages in terms of convergence, interpretability and system sizes that can be handled. By the time of the conference, we will be able to present first results on the higher-order structure of natural images.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Classification and Memory Behaviour of Man Revisited by Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

CSHL Meeting on Computational & Systems Neuroscience (COSYNE), 2004 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2002


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Real-Time Statistical Learning for Oculomotor Control and Visuomotor Coordination

Vijayakumar, S., Souza, A., Peters, J., Conradt, J., Rutkowski, T., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Inoue, M., Shibata, T., Wiryo, A., Itti, L., Amari, S., Schaal, S.

(Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), December 2002 (poster)

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Co-Clustering of Biological Networks and Gene Expression Data

Hanisch, D., Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, (Suppl 1):145S-154S, 18, July 2002 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Large scale gene expression data are often analysed by clustering genes based on gene expression data alone, though a priori knowledge in the form of biological networks is available. The use of this additional information promises to improve exploratory analysis considerably. Results: We propose constructing a distance function which combines information from expression data and biological networks. Based on this function, we compute a joint clustering of genes and vertices of the network. This general approach is elaborated for metabolic networks. We define a graph distance function on such networks and combine it with a correlation-based distance function for gene expression measurements. A hierarchical clustering and an associated statistical measure is computed to arrive at a reasonable number of clusters. Our method is validated using expression data of the yeast diauxic shift. The resulting clusters are easily interpretable in terms of the biochemical network and the gene expression data and suggest that our method is able to automatically identify processes that are relevant under the measured conditions.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Confidence measures for protein fold recognition

Sommer, I., Zien, A., von Ohsen, N., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 18(6):802-812, June 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The contributions of color to recognition memory for natural scenes

Wichmann, F., Sharpe, L., Gegenfurtner, K.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 28(3):509-520, May 2002 (article)

Abstract
The authors used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the influence of color information on visual memory for images of natural scenes. Subjects performed 5-10% better for colored than for black-and-white images independent of exposure duration. Experiment 2 indicated little influence of contrast once the images were suprathreshold, and Experiment 3 revealed that performance worsened when images were presented in color and tested in black and white, or vice versa, leading to the conclusion that the surface property color is part of the memory representation. Experiments 4 and 5 exclude the possibility that the superior recognition memory for colored images results solely from attentional factors or saliency. Finally, the recognition memory advantage disappears for falsely colored images of natural scenes: The improvement in recognition memory depends on the color congruence of presented images with learned knowledge about the color gamut found within natural scenes. The results can be accounted for within a multiple memory systems framework.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Detection and discrimination in pink noise

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

5, pages: 100, 5. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about early spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli, which are not, perhaps, particularly "natural" stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast whilst keeping the number of unknown parameters comparatively small. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on our display was measured using a high-performance digital camera (Photometrics) and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband 1-D "pink" noise made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Training invariant support vector machines

DeCoste, D., Schölkopf, B.

Machine Learning, 46(1-3):161-190, January 2002 (article)

Abstract
Practical experience has shown that in order to obtain the best possible performance, prior knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand ought to be incorporated into the training procedure. We describe and review all known methods for doing so in support vector machines, provide experimental results, and discuss their respective merits. One of the significant new results reported in this work is our recent achievement of the lowest reported test error on the well-known MNIST digit recognition benchmark task, with SVM training times that are also significantly faster than previous SVM methods.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Model Selection for Small Sample Regression

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bengio, Y.

Machine Learning, 48(1-3):9-23, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Model selection is an important ingredient of many machine learning algorithms, in particular when the sample size in small, in order to strike the right trade-off between overfitting and underfitting. Previous classical results for linear regression are based on an asymptotic analysis. We present a new penalization method for performing model selection for regression that is appropriate even for small samples. Our penalization is based on an accurate estimator of the ratio of the expected training error and the expected generalization error, in terms of the expected eigenvalues of the input covariance matrix.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency

Bird, C., Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1267-1273, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The detectability of contrast increments was measured as a function of the contrast of a masking or “pedestal” grating at a number of different spatial frequencies ranging from 2 to 16 cycles per degree of visual angle. The pedestal grating always had the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase as the signal. The shape of the contrast increment threshold versus pedestal contrast (TvC) functions depend of the performance level used to define the “threshold,” but when both axes are normalized by the contrast corresponding to 75% correct detection at each frequency, the (TvC) functions at a given performance level are identical. Confidence intervals on the slope of the rising part of the TvC functions are so wide that it is not possible with our data to reject Weber’s Law.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A Bennett Concentration Inequality and Its Application to Suprema of Empirical Processes

Bousquet, O.

C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. I, 334, pages: 495-500, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We introduce new concentration inequalities for functions on product spaces. They allow to obtain a Bennett type deviation bound for suprema of empirical processes indexed by upper bounded functions. The result is an improvement on Rio's version \cite{Rio01b} of Talagrand's inequality \cite{Talagrand96} for equidistributed variables.

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Numerical evolution of axisymmetric, isolated systems in general relativity

Frauendiener, J., Hein, M.

Physical Review D, 66, pages: 124004-124004, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We describe in this article a new code for evolving axisymmetric isolated systems in general relativity. Such systems are described by asymptotically flat space-times, which have the property that they admit a conformal extension. We are working directly in the extended conformal manifold and solve numerically Friedrich's conformal field equations, which state that Einstein's equations hold in the physical space-time. Because of the compactness of the conformal space-time the entire space-time can be calculated on a finite numerical grid. We describe in detail the numerical scheme, especially the treatment of the axisymmetry and the boundary.

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for biological sequences

Tsuda, K., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 1):268-275, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Application of Monte Carlo Methods to Psychometric Function Fitting

Wichmann, F.

Proceedings of the 33rd European Conference on Mathematical Psychology, pages: 44, 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer's performance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. Here I describe methods to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing goodness-of-fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function's parameters and other estimates derived from them. First I describe a constrained maximum-likelihood method for parameter estimation. Using Monte-Carlo simulations I demonstrate that it is important to have a fitting method that takes stimulus-independent errors (or "lapses") into account. Second, a number of goodness-of-fit tests are introduced. Because psychophysical data sets are usually rather small I advocate the use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory for goodness-of-fit assessment. Third, a parametric bootstrap is employed to estimate the variability of fitted parameters and derived quantities such as thresholds and slopes. I describe how the bootstrap bridging assumption, on which the validity of the procedure depends, can be tested without incurring too high a cost in computation time. Finally I describe how the methods can be extended to test hypotheses concerning the form and shape of several psychometric functions. Software describing the methods is available (http://www.bootstrap-software.com/psignifit/), as well as articles describing the methods in detail (Wichmann&Hill, Perception&Psychophysics, 2001a,b).

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Stability and Generalization

Bousquet, O., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 2, pages: 499-526, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We define notions of stability for learning algorithms and show how to use these notions to derive generalization error bounds based on the empirical error and the leave-one-out error. The methods we use can be applied in the regression framework as well as in the classification one when the classifier is obtained by thresholding a real-valued function. We study the stability properties of large classes of learning algorithms such as regularization based algorithms. In particular we focus on Hilbert space regularization and Kullback-Leibler regularization. We demonstrate how to apply the results to SVM for regression and classification.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]