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2012


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Context-aware brain-computer interfaces: exploring the information space of user, technical system and environment

Zander, TO., Jatzev, S.

Journal of Neural Engineering, 9(1):016003, 10, February 2012 (article)

Abstract
Brain–computer interface (BCI) systems are usually applied in highly controlled environments such as research laboratories or clinical setups. However, many BCI-based applications are implemented in more complex environments. For example, patients might want to use a BCI system at home, and users without disabilities could benefit from BCI systems in special working environments. In these contexts, it might be more difficult to reliably infer information about brain activity, because many intervening factors add up and disturb the BCI feature space. One solution for this problem would be adding context awareness to the system. We propose to augment the available information space with additional channels carrying information about the user state, the environment and the technical system. In particular, passive BCI systems seem to be capable of adding highly relevant context information—otherwise covert aspects of user state. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework based on general human–machine system research for adding context awareness to a BCI system. Building on that, we present results from a study on a passive BCI, which allows access to the covert aspect of user state related to the perceived loss of control. This study is a proof of concept and demonstrates that context awareness could beneficially be implemented in and combined with a BCI system or a general human–machine system. The EEG data from this experiment are available for public download at www.phypa.org.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

2012

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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How the initialization affects the stability of the k-means algorithm

Bubeck, S., Meila, M., von Luxburg, U.

ESAIM: Probability and Statistics, 16, pages: 436-452, January 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Joint Modelling of Confounding Factors and Prominent Genetic Regulators Provides Increased Accuracy in Genetical Genomics Studies

Fusi, N., Stegle, O., Lawrence, ND.

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(1):1-9, January 2012 (article)

Abstract
Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies are an integral tool to investigate the genetic component of gene expression variation. A major challenge in the analysis of such studies are hidden confounding factors, such as unobserved covariates or unknown subtle environmental perturbations. These factors can induce a pronounced artifactual correlation structure in the expression profiles, which may create spurious false associations or mask real genetic association signals. Here, we report PANAMA (Probabilistic ANAlysis of genoMic dAta), a novel probabilistic model to account for confounding factors within an eQTL analysis. In contrast to previous methods, PANAMA learns hidden factors jointly with the effect of prominent genetic regulators. As a result, this new model can more accurately distinguish true genetic association signals from confounding variation. We applied our model and compared it to existing methods on different datasets and biological systems. PANAMA consistently performs better than alternative methods, and finds in particular substantially more trans regulators. Importantly, our approach not only identifies a greater number of associations, but also yields hits that are biologically more plausible and can be better reproduced between independent studies. A software implementation of PANAMA is freely available online at http://ml.sheffield.ac.uk/qtl/.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Simultaneous small animal PET/MR reveals different brain networks during stimulation and rest

Wehrl, H., Hossain, M., Lankes, K., Liu, C., Bezrukov, I., Martirosian, P., Reischl, G., Schick, F., Pichler, B.

World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian flexible fitting of biomolecular structures into EM maps

Habeck, M.

Biophysical journal, 2012 (article) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support Measure Machines for Quasar Target Selection

Muandet, K.

Astro Imaging Workshop, 2012 (talk)

Abstract
In this talk I will discuss the problem of quasar target selection. The objects attributes in astronomy such as fluxes are often subjected to substantial and heterogeneous measurement uncertainties, especially for the medium-redshift between 2.2 and 3.5 quasars which is relatively rare and must be targeted down to g ~ 22 mag. Most of the previous works for quasar target selection includes UV-excess, kernel density estimation, a likelihood approach, and artificial neural network cannot directly deal with the heterogeneous input uncertainties. Recently, extreme deconvolution (XD) has been used to tackle this problem in a well-posed manner. In this work, we present a discriminative approach for quasar target selection that can deal with input uncertainties directly. To do so, we represent each object as a Gaussian distribution whose mean is the object's attribute vector and covariance is the given flux measurement uncertainty. Given a training set of Gaussian distributions, the support measure machines (SMMs) algorithm are trained and used to build the quasar targeting catalog. Preliminary results will also be presented. Joint work with Jo Bovy and Bernhard Sch{\"o}lkopf

Web [BibTex]


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Measurement and Calibration of Noise Bias in Weak Lensing Galaxy Shape Estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), 2012 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Analysis: A Link Between Inference and Statistical Physics

Seldin, Y.

Workshop on Statistical Physics of Inference and Control Theory, 2012 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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LMM-Lasso: A Lasso Multi-Marker Mixed Model for Association Mapping with Population Structure Correction

Rakitsch, B., Lippert, C., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM.

Bioinformatics, 29(2):206-214, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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PET Performance Measurements of a Next Generation Dedicated Small Animal PET/MR Scanner

Liu, C., Hossain, M., Lankes, K., Bezrukov, I., Wehrl, H., Kolb, A., Judenhofer, M., Pichler, B.

Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS-MIC), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Existential neuroscience: a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of neural responses to reminders of one’s mortality

Quirin, M., Loktyushin, A., Arndt, J., Küstermann, E., Lo, Y., Kuhl, J., Eggert, L.

Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 7(2):193-198, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Active learning for domain adaptation in the supervised classification of remote sensing images

Persello, C., Bruzzone, L.

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 50(11):4468-4483, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Analysis of Supervised, Unsupervised, and Reinforcement Learning

Seldin, Y., Laviolette, F., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Tutorial at the 29th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2012 (talk)

Web Web [BibTex]

Web Web [BibTex]


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Influence of MR-based attenuation correction on lesions within bone and susceptibility artifact regions

Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Mantlik, F., Schwenzer, N., Brendle, C., Pichler, B.

Molekulare Bildgebung (MoBi), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Reinforcement learning to adjust parametrized motor primitives to new situations

Kober, J., Wilhelm, A., Oztop, E., Peters, J.

Autonomous Robots, 33(4):361-379, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Humans manage to adapt learned movements very quickly to new situations by generalizing learned behaviors from similar situations. In contrast, robots currently often need to re-learn the complete movement. In this paper, we propose a method that learns to generalize parametrized motor plans by adapting a small set of global parameters, called meta-parameters. We employ reinforcement learning to learn the required meta-parameters to deal with the current situation, described by states. We introduce an appropriate reinforcement learning algorithm based on a kernelized version of the reward-weighted regression. To show its feasibility, we evaluate this algorithm on a toy example and compare it to several previous approaches. Subsequently, we apply the approach to three robot tasks, i.e., the generalization of throwing movements in darts, of hitting movements in table tennis, and of throwing balls where the tasks are learned on several different real physical robots, i.e., a Barrett WAM, a BioRob, the JST-ICORP/SARCOS CBi and a Kuka KR 6.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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On the Empirical Estimation of Integral Probability Metrics

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Schölkopf, B., Lanckriet, G.

Electronic Journal of Statistics, 6, pages: 1550-1599, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Structured Apprenticeship Learning

Boularias, A., Kroemer, O., Peters, J.

European Workshop on Reinforcement Learning (EWRL), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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PAC-Bayesian Analysis and Its Applications

Seldin, Y., Laviolette, F., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Tutorial at The European Conference on Machine Learning and Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (ECML-PKDD), 2012 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

Lois, C., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Werner, M., Kupferschläger, J., Beyer, T.

European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 39(11):1756-1766, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Multitask Learning in Computational Biology

Widmer, C., Rätsch, G.

JMLR W\&CP. ICML 2011 Unsupervised and Transfer Learning Workshop, 27, pages: 207-216, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Computational Biology provides a wide range of applications for Multitask Learning (MTL) methods. As the generation of labels often is very costly in the biomedical domain, combining data from different related problems or tasks is a promising strategy to reduce label cost. In this paper, we present two problems from sequence biology, where MTL was successfully applied. For this, we use regularization-based MTL methods, with a special focus on the case of a hierarchical relationship between tasks. Furthermore, we propose strategies to refine the measure of task relatedness, which is of central importance in MTL and finally give some practical guidelines, when MTL strategies are likely to pay off.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Machine Learning and Interpretation in Neuroimaging - Revised Selected and Invited Contributions

Langs, G., Rish, I., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Murphy, B.

pages: 266, Springer, Heidelberg, Germany, International Workshop, MLINI, Held at NIPS, 2012, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 7263 (proceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel Bellman Equations in POMDPs

Nishiyama, Y., Boularias, A., Gretton, A., Fukumizu, K.

Technical Committee on Infomation-Based Induction Sciences and Machine Learning (IBISML'12), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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MICCAI, Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, 2012 (electronic publication)

Panagiotaki, E., O’Donnell, L., Schultz, T., Zhang, G.

15th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention (MICCAI), Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI , 2012 (proceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Arabidopsis defense against Botrytis cinerea: chronology and regulation deciphered by high-resolution temporal transcriptomic analysis

Windram, O., Madhou, P., McHattie, S., Hill, C., Hickman, R., Cooke, E., Jenkins, DJ., Penfold, CA., Baxter, Ll., Breeze, E., Kiddle, SJ., Rhodes, J., Atwell, S., Kliebenstein, D., Kim, Y-S., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM., others

The Plant Cell Online, 24(9):3530-3557, 2012, all authors: Oliver Windram,Priyadharshini Madhou,Stuart McHattie,Claire Hill,Richard Hickman,Emma Cooke,Dafyd J. Jenkins,Christopher A. Penfold,Laura Baxter,Emily Breeze,Steven J. Kiddle,Johanna Rhodes,Susanna Atwell,Daniel J. (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Improved Linear Mixed Models for Genome-Wide Association Studies

Listgarten, J., Lippert, C., Kadie, CM., Davidson, RI., Eskin, E., Heckerman, D.

Nature Methods, 9, pages: 525–526, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Calibration of Boltzmann distribution priors in Bayesian data analysis

Mechelke, M., Habeck, M.

Physical Review E, 86(6):066705, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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CSB: A Python framework for computational structural biology

Kalev, I., Mechelke, M., Kopec, K., Holder, T., Carstens, S., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 28(22):2996-2997, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Summary: Computational Structural Biology Toolbox (CSB) is a cross-platform Python class library for reading, storing and analyzing biomolecular structures with rich support for statistical analyses. CSB is designed for reusability and extensibility and comes with a clean, well-documented API following good object-oriented engineering practice. Availability: Stable release packages are available for download from the Python Package Index (PyPI), as well as from the project’s web site http://csb.codeplex.com.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Design of a Haptic Interface for a Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Simulation

Yu, S., Woo, H. S., Son, H. I., Ahn, W., Jung, H., Lee, D. Y., Yi, S. Y.

Advanced Robotics, 26(18):2115-2143, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Beta oscillations propagate as traveling waves in the macaque prefrontal cortex

Panagiotaropoulos, T., Besserve, M., Logothetis, N.

42nd Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), 2012 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Significant global reduction of carbon uptake by water-cycle driven extreme vegetation anomalies

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., von Buttlar, J., Harmeling, S., Jung, M., Randerson, J., Reichstein, M.

Nature Geoscience, 2012 (article) In revision

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Measurement and calibration of noise bias in weak lensing galaxy shape estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 427(4):2711-2722, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Image analysis for cosmology: results from the GREAT10 Galaxy Challenge

Kitching, T. D., Balan, S. T., Bridle, S., Cantale, N., Courbin, F., Eifler, T., Gentile, M., Gill, M. S. S., Harmeling, S., Heymans, C., others,

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 423(4):3163-3208, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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First SN Discoveries from the Dark Energy Survey

Abbott, T., Abdalla, F., Achitouv, I., Ahn, E., Aldering, G., Allam, S., Alonso, D., Amara, A., Annis, J., Antonik, M., others,

The Astronomer's Telegram, 4668, pages: 1, 2012 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A sensorimotor paradigm for Bayesian model selection

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6(291):1-16, October 2012 (article)

Abstract
Sensorimotor control is thought to rely on predictive internal models in order to cope efficiently with uncertain environments. Recently, it has been shown that humans not only learn different internal models for different tasks, but that they also extract common structure between tasks. This raises the question of how the motor system selects between different structures or models, when each model can be associated with a range of different task-specific parameters. Here we design a sensorimotor task that requires subjects to compensate visuomotor shifts in a three-dimensional virtual reality setup, where one of the dimensions can be mapped to a model variable and the other dimension to the parameter variable. By introducing probe trials that are neutral in the parameter dimension, we can directly test for model selection. We found that model selection procedures based on Bayesian statistics provided a better explanation for subjects’ choice behavior than simple non-probabilistic heuristics. Our experimental design lends itself to the general study of model selection in a sensorimotor context as it allows to separately query model and parameter variables from subjects.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Risk-Sensitivity in Bayesian Sensorimotor Integration

Grau-Moya, J, Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(9):1-7, sep 2012 (article)

Abstract
Information processing in the nervous system during sensorimotor tasks with inherent uncertainty has been shown to be consistent with Bayesian integration. Bayes optimal decision-makers are, however, risk-neutral in the sense that they weigh all possibilities based on prior expectation and sensory evidence when they choose the action with highest expected value. In contrast, risk-sensitive decision-makers are sensitive to model uncertainty and bias their decision-making processes when they do inference over unobserved variables. In particular, they allow deviations from their probabilistic model in cases where this model makes imprecise predictions. Here we test for risk-sensitivity in a sensorimotor integration task where subjects exhibit Bayesian information integration when they infer the position of a target from noisy sensory feedback. When introducing a cost associated with subjects' response, we found that subjects exhibited a characteristic bias towards low cost responses when their uncertainty was high. This result is in accordance with risk-sensitive decision-making processes that allow for deviations from Bayes optimal decision-making in the face of uncertainty. Our results suggest that both Bayesian integration and risk-sensitivity are important factors to understand sensorimotor integration in a quantitative fashion.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2001


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Anabolic and Catabolic Gene Expression Pattern Analysis in Normal Versus Osteoarthritic Cartilage Using Complementary DNA-Array Technology

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Gehrsitz, A., Gebhard, P., McKenna, L.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 44(12):2777-2789, December 2001 (article)

Web [BibTex]

2001

Web [BibTex]


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Generalization performance of regularization networks and support vector machines via entropy numbers of compact operators

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 47(6):2516-2532, September 2001 (article)

Abstract
We derive new bounds for the generalization error of kernel machines, such as support vector machines and related regularization networks by obtaining new bounds on their covering numbers. The proofs make use of a viewpoint that is apparently novel in the field of statistical learning theory. The hypothesis class is described in terms of a linear operator mapping from a possibly infinite-dimensional unit ball in feature space into a finite-dimensional space. The covering numbers of the class are then determined via the entropy numbers of the operator. These numbers, which characterize the degree of compactness of the operator can be bounded in terms of the eigenvalues of an integral operator induced by the kernel function used by the machine. As a consequence, we are able to theoretically explain the effect of the choice of kernel function on the generalization performance of support vector machines.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Centralization: A new method for the normalization of gene expression data

Zien, A., Aigner, T., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 17, pages: S323-S331, June 2001, Mathematical supplement available at http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/574280.html (article)

Abstract
Microarrays measure values that are approximately proportional to the numbers of copies of different mRNA molecules in samples. Due to technical difficulties, the constant of proportionality between the measured intensities and the numbers of mRNA copies per cell is unknown and may vary for different arrays. Usually, the data are normalized (i.e., array-wise multiplied by appropriate factors) in order to compensate for this effect and to enable informative comparisons between different experiments. Centralization is a new two-step method for the computation of such normalization factors that is both biologically better motivated and more robust than standard approaches. First, for each pair of arrays the quotient of the constants of proportionality is estimated. Second, from the resulting matrix of pairwise quotients an optimally consistent scaling of the samples is computed.

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Failure Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

Journal of Control, Automation and Systems Engineering, 7(5):375-383, May 2001, In Korean (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Pattern Selection Using the Bias and Variance of Ensemble

Shin, H., Cho, S.

Journal of the Korean Institute of Industrial Engineers, 28(1):112-127, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
[Abstract]: A useful pattern is a pattern that contributes much to learning. For a classification problem those patterns near the class boundary surfaces carry more information to the classifier. For a regression problem the ones near the estimated surface carry more information. In both cases, the usefulness is defined only for those patterns either without error or with negligible error. Using only the useful patterns gives several benefits. First, computational complexity in memory and time for learning is decreased. Second, overfitting is avoided even when the learner is over-sized. Third, learning results in more stable learners. In this paper, we propose a pattern “utility index” that measures the utility of an individual pattern. The utility index is based on the bias and variance of a pattern trained by a network ensemble. In classification, the pattern with a low bias and a high variance gets a high score. In regression, on the other hand, the one with a low bias and a low variance gets a high score. Based on the distribution of the utility index, the original training set is divided into a high-score group and a low-score group. Only the high-score group is then used for training. The proposed method is tested on synthetic and real-world benchmark datasets. The proposed approach gives a better or at least similar performance.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure and Functionality of a Designed p53 Dimer.

Davison, TS., Nie, X., Ma, W., Lin, Y., Kay, C., Benchimol, S., Arrowsmith, C.

Journal of Molecular Biology, 307(2):605-617, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
P53 is a homotetrameric tumor suppressor protein involved in transcriptional control of genes that regulate cell proliferation and death. In order to probe the role that oligomerization plays in this capacity, we have previously designed and characterized a series of p53 proteins with altered oligomeric states through hydrophilc substitution of residues Met340 or Leu344 in the normally tetrameric oligomerization domain. Although such mutations have little effect on the overall secondary structural content of the oligomerization domain, both solubility and the resistance to thermal denaturation are substantially reduced relative to that of the wild-type domain. Here, we report the design and characterization of a double-mutant p53 with alterations of residues at positions Met340 and Leu344. The double-mutations Met340Glu/Leu344Lys and Met340Gln/Leu344Arg resulted in distinct dimeric forms of the protein. Furthermore, we have verified by NMR structure determination that the double-mutant Met340Gln/Leu344Arg is essentially a "half-tetramer". Analysis of the in vivo activities of full-length p53 oligomeric mutants reveals that while cell-cycle arrest requires tetrameric p53, transcriptional transactivation activity of monomers and dimers retain roughly background and half of the wild-type activity, respectively.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 12(2):181-201, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
This paper provides an introduction to support vector machines, kernel Fisher discriminant analysis, and kernel principal component analysis, as examples for successful kernel-based learning methods. We first give a short background about Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory and kernel feature spaces and then proceed to kernel based learning in supervised and unsupervised scenarios including practical and algorithmic considerations. We illustrate the usefulness of kernel algorithms by discussing applications such as optical character recognition and DNA analysis

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution.

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

Neural Computation, 13(7):1443-1471, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some data set drawn from an underlying probability distribution P and you want to estimate a “simple” subset S of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from P lies outside of S equals some a priori specified value between 0 and 1. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function f that is positive on S and negative on the complement. The functional form of f is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. The expansion coefficients are found by solving a quadratic programming problem, which we do by carrying out sequential optimization over pairs of input patterns. We also provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabeled data.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: II. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals and sampling

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1314-1329, 2001 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The control structure of artificial creatures

Zhou, D., Dai, R.

Artificial Life and Robotics, 5(3), 2001, invited article (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]