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2008


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Beyond Sliding Windows: Object Localization by Efficient Subwindow Search

Lampert, C., Blaschko, M., Hofmann, T.

In CVPR 2008, pages: 1-8, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, June 2008, Best paper award (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most successful object recognition systems rely on binary classification, deciding only if an object is present or not, but not providing information on the actual object location. To perform localization, one can take a sliding window approach, but this strongly increases the computational cost, because the classifier function has to be evaluated over a large set of candidate subwindows. In this paper, we propose a simple yet powerful branchand- bound scheme that allows efficient maximization of a large class of classifier functions over all possible subimages. It converges to a globally optimal solution typically in sublinear time. We show how our method is applicable to different object detection and retrieval scenarios. The achieved speedup allows the use of classifiers for localization that formerly were considered too slow for this task, such as SVMs with a spatial pyramid kernel or nearest neighbor classifiers based on the 2-distance. We demonstrate state-of-the-art performance of the resulting systems on the UIUC Cars dataset, the PASCAL VOC 2006 dataset and in the PASCAL VOC 2007 competition.

PDF PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

2008

PDF PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Computed Torque Control with Nonparametric Regression Models

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Seeger, M., Peters, J.

In ACC 2008, pages: 212-217, IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 2008 American Control Conference, June 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Computed torque control allows the design of considerably more precise, energy-efficient and compliant controls for robots. However, the major obstacle is the requirement of an accurate model for torque generation, which cannot be obtained in some cases using rigid-body formulations due to unmodeled nonlinearities, such as complex friction or actuator dynamics. In such cases, models approximated from robot data present an appealing alternative. In this paper, we compare two nonparametric regression methods for model approximation, i.e., locally weighted projection regression (LWPR) and Gaussian process regression (GPR). While locally weighted regression was employed for real-time model estimation in learning adaptive control, Gaussian process regression has not been used in control to-date due to high computational requirements. The comparison includes the assessment of model approximation for both regression methods using data originated from SARCOS robot arm, as well as an evaluation of the robot tracking p erformance in computed torque control employing the approximated models. Our results show that GPR can be applied for real-time control achieving higher accuracy. However, for the online learning LWPR is superior by reason of lower computational requirements.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Multi-Classification by Categorical Features via Clustering

Seldin, Y., Tishby, N.

In In the proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2008), pages: 920-927, 25th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), June 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We derive a generalization bound for multi-classification schemes based on grid clustering in categorical parameter product spaces. Grid clustering partitions the parameter space in the form of a Cartesian product of partitions for each of the parameters. The derived bound provides a means to evaluate clustering solutions in terms of the generalization power of a built-on classifier. For classification based on a single feature the bound serves to find a globally optimal classification rule. Comparison of the generalization power of individual features can then be used for feature ranking. Our experiments show that in this role the bound is much more precise than mutual information or normalized correlation indices.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Kernel Test of Nonlinear Granger Causality

Sun, X.

In Proceedings of the Workshop on Inference and Estimation in Probabilistic Time-Series Models, pages: 79-89, (Editors: Barber, D. , A. T. Cemgil, S. Chiappa), Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge, United Kingdom, Workshop on Inference and Estimation in Probabilistic Time-Series Models, June 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a novel test of nonlinear Granger causality in bivariate time series. The trace norm of conditional covariance operators is used to capture the prediction errors. Based on this measure, a subsampling-based multiple testing procedure tests the prediction improvement of one time series by the other one. The distributional properties of the resulting p-values reveal the direction of Granger causality. Encouraging results of experiments with simulated and real-world data support our approach.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Thin-Plate Splines Between Riemannian Manifolds

Steinke, F., Hein, M., Schölkopf, B.

Workshop on Geometry and Statistics of Shapes, June 2008 (talk)

Abstract
With the help of differential geometry we describe a framework to define a thin-plate spline like energy for maps between arbitrary Riemannian manifolds. The so-called Eells energy only depends on the intrinsic geometry of the input and output manifold, but not on their respective representation. The energy can then be used for regression between manifolds, we present results for cases where the outputs are rotations, sets of angles, or points on 3D surfaces. In the future we plan to also target regression where the output is an element of "shape space", understood as a Riemannian manifold. One could also further explore the meaning of the Eells energy when applied to diffeomorphisms between shapes, especially with regard to its potential use as a distance measure between shapes that does not depend on the embedding or the parametrisation of the shapes.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Bayesian Color Constancy Revisited

Gehler, P., Rother, C., Blake, A., Minka, T., Sharp, T.

In IEEE Computer Society Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, CVPR, June 2008, http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/CVPR.2008.4587765 (inproceedings)

website+code+data pdf [BibTex]

website+code+data pdf [BibTex]


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Real-time Learning of Resolved Velocity Control on a Mitsubishi PA-10

Peters, J., Nguyen-Tuong, D.

In ICRA 2008, pages: 2872-2877, IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 2008 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Learning inverse kinematics has long been fascinating the robot learning community. While humans acquire this transformation to complicated tool spaces with ease, it is not a straightforward application for supervised learning algorithms due to non-convex learning problem. However, the key insight that the problem can be considered convex in small local regions allows the application of locally linear learning methods. Nevertheless, the local solution of the problem depends on the data distribution which can result into inconsistent global solutions with large model discontinuities. While this problem can be treated in various ways in offline learning, it poses a serious problem for online learning. Previous approaches to the real-time learning of inverse kinematics avoid this problem using smart data generation, such as the learner biasses its own solution. Such biassed solutions can result into premature convergence, and from the resulting solution it is often hard to understand what has been learned in tha t local region. This paper improves and solves this problem by presenting a learning algorithm which can deal with this inconsistency through re-weighting the data online. Furthermore, we show that our algorithms work not only in simulation, but we present real-time learning results on a physical Mitsubishi PA-10 robot arm.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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State Space Compression with Predictive Representations

Boularias, A., Izadi, M., Chaib-Draa, B.

In Flairs 2008, pages: 41-46, (Editors: Wilson, D. C., H. C. Lane), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, 21st International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference, May 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Current studies have demonstrated that the representational power of predictive state representations (PSRs) is at least equal to the one of partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDPs). This is while early steps in planning and generalization with PSRs suggest substantial improvements compared to POMDPs. However, lack of practical algorithms for learning these representations severely restricts their applicability. The computational inefficiency of exact PSR learning methods naturally leads to the exploration of various approximation methods that can provide a good set of core tests through less computational effort. In this paper, we address this problem in an optimization framework. In particular, our approach aims to minimize the potential error that may be caused by missing a number of core tests. We provide analysis of the error caused by this compression and present an empirical evaluation illustrating the performance of this approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning resolved velocity control

Peters, J.

2008 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), May 2008 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Causal inference from statistical data

Sun, X.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Hochschule Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, Germany, April 2008 (phdthesis)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Pairwise Correlations and Multineuronal Firing Patterns in Primary Visual Cortex

Berens, P.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, April 2008 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian methods for protein structure determination

Habeck, M.

Machine Learning in Structural Bioinformatics, April 2008 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Graph Mining with Variational Dirichlet Process Mixture Models

Tsuda, K., Kurihara, K.

In SDM 2008, pages: 432-442, (Editors: Zaki, M. J.), Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Philadelphia, PA, USA, 8th SIAM International Conference on Data Mining, April 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Graph data such as chemical compounds and XML documents are getting more common in many application domains. A main difficulty of graph data processing lies in the intrinsic high dimensionality of graphs, namely, when a graph is represented as a binary feature vector of indicators of all possible subgraph patterns, the dimensionality gets too large for usual statistical methods. We propose a nonparametric Bayesian method for clustering graphs and selecting salient patterns at the same time. Variational inference is adopted here, because sampling is not applicable due to extremely high dimensionality. The feature set minimizing the free energy is efficiently collected with the DFS code tree, where the generation of useless subgraphs is suppressed by a tree pruning condition. In experiments, our method is compared with a simpler approach based on frequent subgraph mining, and graph kernels.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Model-Based Reinforcement Learning with Continuous States and Actions

Deisenroth, M., Rasmussen, C., Peters, J.

In ESANN 2008, pages: 19-24, (Editors: Verleysen, M. ), d-side, Evere, Belgium, European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks, April 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Finding an optimal policy in a reinforcement learning (RL) framework with continuous state and action spaces is challenging. Approximate solutions are often inevitable. GPDP is an approximate dynamic programming algorithm based on Gaussian process (GP) models for the value functions. In this paper, we extend GPDP to the case of unknown transition dynamics. After building a GP model for the transition dynamics, we apply GPDP to this model and determine a continuous-valued policy in the entire state space. We apply the resulting controller to the underpowered pendulum swing up. Moreover, we compare our results on this RL task to a nearly optimal discrete DP solution in a fully known environment.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning Inverse Dynamics: A Comparison

Nguyen-Tuong, D., Peters, J., Seeger, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Computational Intelligence and Learning: Proceedings of the European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks, pages: 13-18, (Editors: M Verleysen), d-side, Evere, Belgium, 16th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN), April 2008 (inproceedings)

Abstract
While it is well-known that model can enhance the control performance in terms of precision or energy efficiency, the practical application has often been limited by the complexities of manually obtaining sufficiently accurate models. In the past, learning has proven a viable alternative to using a combination of rigid-body dynamics and handcrafted approximations of nonlinearities. However, a major open question is what nonparametric learning method is suited best for learning dynamics? Traditionally, locally weighted projection regression (LWPR), has been the standard method as it is capable of online, real-time learning for very complex robots. However, while LWPR has had significant impact on learning in robotics, alternative nonparametric regression methods such as support vector regression (SVR) and Gaussian processes regression (GPR) offer interesting alternatives with fewer open parameters and potentially higher accuracy. In this paper, we evaluate these three alternatives for model learning. Our comparison consists out of the evaluation of learning quality for each regression method using original data from SARCOS robot arm, as well as the robot tracking performance employing learned models. The results show that GPR and SVR achieve a superior learning precision and can be applied for real-time control obtaining higher accuracy. However, for the online learning LWPR presents the better method due to its lower computational requirements.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Development and Application of a Python Scripting Framework for BCI2000

Schreiner, T.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, January 2008 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Efficient and Invariant Regularisation with Application to Computer Graphics

Walder, CJ.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, January 2008 (phdthesis)

Abstract
This thesis develops the theory and practise of reproducing kernel methods. Many functional inverse problems which arise in, for example, machine learning and computer graphics, have been treated with practical success using methods based on a reproducing kernel Hilbert space perspective. This perspective is often theoretically convenient, in that many functional analysis problems reduce to linear algebra problems in these spaces. Somewhat more complex is the case of conditionally positive definite kernels, and we provide an introduction to both cases, deriving in a particularly elementary manner some key results for the conditionally positive definite case. A common complaint of the practitioner is the long running time of these kernel based algorithms. We provide novel ways of alleviating these problems by essentially using a non-standard function basis which yields computational advantages. That said, by doing so we must also forego the aforementioned theoretical conveniences, and hence need some additional analysis which we provide in order to make the approach practicable. We demonstrate that the method leads to state of the art performance on the problem of surface reconstruction from points. We also provide some analysis of kernels invariant to transformations such as translation and dilation, and show that this indicates the value of learning algorithms which use conditionally positive definite kernels. Correspondingly, we provide a few approaches for making such algorithms practicable. We do this either by modifying the kernel, or directly solving problems with conditionally positive definite kernels, which had previously only been solved with positive definite kernels. We demonstrate the advantage of this approach, in particular by attaining state of the art classification performance with only one free parameter.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]

2003


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Learning Control and Planning from the View of Control Theory and Imitation

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

NIPS Workshop "Planning for the Real World: The promises and challenges of dealing with uncertainty", December 2003 (talk)

Abstract
Learning control and planning in high dimensional continuous state-action systems, e.g., as needed in a humanoid robot, has so far been a domain beyond the applicability of generic planning techniques like reinforcement learning and dynamic programming. This talk describes an approach we have taken in order to enable complex robotics systems to learn to accomplish control tasks. Adaptive learning controllers equipped with statistical learning techniques can be used to learn tracking controllers -- missing state information and uncertainty in the state estimates are usually addressed by observers or direct adaptive control methods. Imitation learning is used as an ingredient to seed initial control policies whose output is a desired trajectory suitable to accomplish the task at hand. Reinforcement learning with stochastic policy gradients using a natural gradient forms the third component that allows refining the initial control policy until the task is accomplished. In comparison to general learning control, this approach is highly prestructured and thus more domain specific. However, it seems to be a theoretically clean and feasible strategy for control systems of the complexity that we need to address.

Web [BibTex]

2003

Web [BibTex]


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Recurrent neural networks from learning attractor dynamics

Schaal, S., Peters, J.

NIPS Workshop on RNNaissance: Recurrent Neural Networks, December 2003 (talk)

Abstract
Many forms of recurrent neural networks can be understood in terms of dynamic systems theory of difference equations or differential equations. Learning in such systems corresponds to adjusting some internal parameters to obtain a desired time evolution of the network, which can usually be characterized in term of point attractor dynamics, limit cycle dynamics, or, in some more rare cases, as strange attractor or chaotic dynamics. Finding a stable learning process to adjust the open parameters of the network towards shaping the desired attractor type and basin of attraction has remain a complex task, as the parameter trajectories during learning can lead the system through a variety of undesirable unstable behaviors, such that learning may never succeed. In this presentation, we review a recently developed learning framework for a class of recurrent neural networks that employs a more structured network approach. We assume that the canonical system behavior is known a priori, e.g., it is a point attractor or a limit cycle. With either supervised learning or reinforcement learning, it is possible to acquire the transformation from a simple representative of this canonical behavior (e.g., a 2nd order linear point attractor, or a simple limit cycle oscillator) to the desired highly complex attractor form. For supervised learning, one shot learning based on locally weighted regression techniques is possible. For reinforcement learning, stochastic policy gradient techniques can be employed. In any case, the recurrent network learned by these methods inherits the stability properties of the simple dynamic system that underlies the nonlinear transformation, such that stability of the learning approach is not a problem. We demonstrate the success of this approach for learning various skills on a humanoid robot, including tasks that require to incorporate additional sensory signals as coupling terms to modify the recurrent network evolution on-line.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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How to Deal with Large Dataset, Class Imbalance and Binary Output in SVM based Response Model

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 93-107, Korean Data Mining Conference, December 2003, Best Paper Award (inproceedings)

Abstract
[Abstract]: Various machine learning methods have made a rapid transition to response modeling in search of improved performance. And support vector machine (SVM) has also been attracting much attention lately. This paper presents an SVM response model. We are specifically focusing on the how-to’s to circumvent practical obstacles, such as how to face with class imbalance problem, how to produce the scores from an SVM classifier for lift chart analysis, and how to evaluate the models on accuracy and profit. Besides coping with the intractability problem of SVM training caused by large marketing dataset, a previously proposed pattern selection algorithm is introduced. SVM training accompanies time complexity of the cube of training set size. The pattern selection algorithm picks up important training patterns before SVM response modeling. We made comparison on SVM training results between the pattern selection algorithm and random sampling. Three aspects of SVM response models were evaluated: accuracies, lift chart analysis, and computational efficiency. The SVM trained with selected patterns showed a high accuracy, a high uplift in profit and in response rate, and a high computational efficiency.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Bayesian Monte Carlo

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 489-496, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate Bayesian alternatives to classical Monte Carlo methods for evaluating integrals. Bayesian Monte Carlo (BMC) allows the incorporation of prior knowledge, such as smoothness of the integrand, into the estimation. In a simple problem we show that this outperforms any classical importance sampling method. We also attempt more challenging multidimensional integrals involved in computing marginal likelihoods of statistical models (a.k.a. partition functions and model evidences). We find that Bayesian Monte Carlo outperformed Annealed Importance Sampling, although for very high dimensional problems or problems with massive multimodality BMC may be less adequate. One advantage of the Bayesian approach to Monte Carlo is that samples can be drawn from any distribution. This allows for the possibility of active design of sample points so as to maximise information gain.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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On the Complexity of Learning the Kernel Matrix

Bousquet, O., Herrmann, D.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 399-406, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate data based procedures for selecting the kernel when learning with Support Vector Machines. We provide generalization error bounds by estimating the Rademacher complexities of the corresponding function classes. In particular we obtain a complexity bound for function classes induced by kernels with given eigenvectors, i.e., we allow to vary the spectrum and keep the eigenvectors fix. This bound is only a logarithmic factor bigger than the complexity of the function class induced by a single kernel. However, optimizing the margin over such classes leads to overfitting. We thus propose a suitable way of constraining the class. We use an efficient algorithm to solve the resulting optimization problem, present preliminary experimental results, and compare them to an alignment-based approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Control, Planning, Learning, and Imitation with Dynamic Movement Primitives

Schaal, S., Peters, J., Nakanishi, J., Ijspeert, A.

In IROS 2003, pages: 1-21, Workshop on Bilateral Paradigms on Humans and Humanoids, IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, October 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Discriminative Learning for Label Sequences via Boosting

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Johnson, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer ), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper investigates a boosting approach to discriminative learning of label sequences based on a sequence rank loss function.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Multiple-step ahead prediction for non linear dynamic systems: A Gaussian Process treatment with propagation of the uncertainty

Girard, A., Rasmussen, CE., Quiñonero-Candela, J., Murray-Smith, R.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 529-536, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the problem of multi-step ahead prediction in time series analysis using the non-parametric Gaussian process model. k-step ahead forecasting of a discrete-time non-linear dynamic system can be performed by doing repeated one-step ahead predictions. For a state-space model of the form y_t = f(y_{t-1},...,y_{t-L}), the prediction of y at time t + k is based on the point estimates of the previous outputs. In this paper, we show how, using an analytical Gaussian approximation, we can formally incorporate the uncertainty about intermediate regressor values, thus updating the uncertainty on the current prediction.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Cluster Kernels for Semi-Supervised Learning

Chapelle, O., Weston, J., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 585-592, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a framework to incorporate unlabeled data in kernel classifier, based on the idea that two points in the same cluster are more likely to have the same label. This is achieved by modifying the eigenspectrum of the kernel matrix. Experimental results assess the validity of this approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Mismatch String Kernels for SVM Protein Classification

Leslie, C., Eskin, E., Weston, J., Noble, W.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1417-1424, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We introduce a class of string kernels, called mismatch kernels, for use with support vector machines (SVMs) in a discriminative approach to the protein classification problem. These kernels measure sequence similarity based on shared occurrences of k-length subsequences, counted with up to m mismatches, and do not rely on any generative model for the positive training sequences. We compute the kernels efficiently using a mismatch tree data structure and report experiments on a benchmark SCOP dataset, where we show that the mismatch kernel used with an SVM classifier performs as well as the Fisher kernel, the most successful method for remote homology detection, while achieving considerable computational savings.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Real-Time Face Detection

Kienzle, W.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany, October 2003 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Incremental Gaussian Processes

Quinonero Candela, J., Winther, O.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1001-1008, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we consider Tipping‘s relevance vector machine (RVM) and formalize an incremental training strategy as a variant of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm that we call subspace EM. Working with a subset of active basis functions, the sparsity of the RVM solution will ensure that the number of basis functions and thereby the computational complexity is kept low. We also introduce a mean field approach to the intractable classification model that is expected to give a very good approximation to exact Bayesian inference and contains the Laplace approximation as a special case. We test the algorithms on two large data sets with O(10^3-10^4) examples. The results indicate that Bayesian learning of large data sets, e.g. the MNIST database is realistic.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 873-880, (Editors: S Becker and S Thrun and K Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 16th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Derivative observations in Gaussian Process models of dynamic systems

Solak, E., Murray-Smith, R., Leithead, WE., Leith, D., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1033-1040, (Editors: Becker, S., S. Thrun and K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gaussian processes provide an approach to nonparametric modelling which allows a straightforward combination of function and derivative observations in an empirical model. This is of particular importance in identification of nonlinear dynamic systems from experimental data. 1) It allows us to combine derivative information, and associated uncertainty with normal function observations into the learning and inference process. This derivative information can be in the form of priors specified by an expert or identified from perturbation data close to equilibrium. 2) It allows a seamless fusion of multiple local linear models in a consistent manner, inferring consistent models and ensuring that integrability constraints are met. 3) It improves dramatically the computational efficiency of Gaussian process models for dynamic system identification, by summarising large quantities of near-equilibrium data by a handful of linearisations, reducing the training set size - traditionally a problem for Gaussian process models.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Linear Combinations of Optic Flow Vectors for Estimating Self-Motion: a Real-World Test of a Neural Model

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 1319-1326, (Editors: Becker, S., S. Thrun and K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an estimator consisting of a linear combination of optic flow vectors that incorporates prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Clustering with the Fisher score

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 15, pages: 729-736, (Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), October 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently the Fisher score (or the Fisher kernel) is increasingly used as a feature extractor for classification problems. The Fisher score is a vector of parameter derivatives of loglikelihood of a probabilistic model. This paper gives a theoretical analysis about how class information is preserved in the space of the Fisher score, which turns out that the Fisher score consists of a few important dimensions with class information and many nuisance dimensions. When we perform clustering with the Fisher score, K-Means type methods are obviously inappropriate because they make use of all dimensions. So we will develop a novel but simple clustering algorithm specialized for the Fisher score, which can exploit important dimensions. This algorithm is successfully tested in experiments with artificial data and real data (amino acid sequences).

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Large Margin Methods for Label Sequence Learning

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T.

In pages: 993-996, International Speech Communication Association, Bonn, Germany, 8th European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology (EuroSpeech), September 2003 (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Fast Pattern Selection Algorithm for Support Vector Classifiers: "Time Complexity Analysis"

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS 2690), LNCS 2690, pages: 1008-1015, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg, The 4th International Conference on Intelligent Data Engineering (IDEAL), September 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training SVM requires large memory and long cpu time when the pattern set is large. To alleviate the computational burden in SVM training, we propose a fast preprocessing algorithm which selects only the patterns near the decision boundary. The time complexity of the proposed algorithm is much smaller than that of the naive M^2 algorithm

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Marginalized Kernels between Labeled Graphs

Kashima, H., Tsuda, K., Inokuchi, A.

In 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 321-328, (Editors: Faucett, T. and N. Mishra), 20th International Conference on Machine Learning, August 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Sparse Gaussian Processes: inference, subspace identification and model selection

Csato, L., Opper, M.

In Proceedings, pages: 1-6, (Editors: Van der Hof, , Wahlberg), The Netherlands, 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identifiaction, August 2003, electronical version; Index ThA02-2 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Gaussian Process (GP) inference is a probabilistic kernel method where the GP is treated as a latent function. The inference is carried out using the Bayesian online learning and its extension to the more general iterative approach which we call TAP/EP learning. Sparsity is introduced in this context to make the TAP/EP method applicable to large datasets. We address the prohibitive scaling of the number of parameters by defining a subset of the training data that is used as the support the GP, thus the number of required parameters is independent of the training set, similar to the case of ``Support--‘‘ or ``Relevance--Vectors‘‘. An advantage of the full probabilistic treatment is that allows the computation of the marginal data likelihood or evidence, leading to hyper-parameter estimation within the GP inference. An EM algorithm to choose the hyper-parameters is proposed. The TAP/EP learning is the E-step and the M-step then updates the hyper-parameters. Due to the sparse E-step the resulting algorithm does not involve manipulation of large matrices. The presented algorithm is applicable to a wide variety of likelihood functions. We present results of applying the algorithm on classification and nonstandard regression problems for artificial and real datasets.

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


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Adaptive, Cautious, Predictive control with Gaussian Process Priors

Murray-Smith, R., Sbarbaro, D., Rasmussen, CE., Girard, A.

In Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, pages: 1195-1200, (Editors: Van den Hof, P., B. Wahlberg and S. Weiland), Proceedings of the 13th IFAC Symposium on System Identification, August 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Nonparametric Gaussian Process models, a Bayesian statistics approach, are used to implement a nonlinear adaptive control law. Predictions, including propagation of the state uncertainty are made over a k-step horizon. The expected value of a quadratic cost function is minimised, over this prediction horizon, without ignoring the variance of the model predictions. The general method and its main features are illustrated on a simulation example.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Machine Learning Summer School, August 2003 (talk)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Generative Model-based Clustering of Directional Data

Banerjee, A., Dhillon, I., Ghosh, J., Sra, S.

In Proc. ACK SIGKDD, pages: 00-00, KDD, August 2003 (inproceedings)

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Hidden Markov Support Vector Machines

Altun, Y., Tsochantaridis, I., Hofmann, T.

In pages: 4-11, (Editors: Fawcett, T. , N. Mishra), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, Twentieth International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), August 2003 (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Remarks on Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Machine Learning Summer School, August 2003 (talk)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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How Many Neighbors To Consider in Pattern Pre-selection for Support Vector Classifiers?

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of INNS-IEEE International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2003), pages: 565-570, IJCNN, July 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training support vector classifiers (SVC) requires large memory and long cpu time when the pattern set is large. To alleviate the computational burden in SVC training, we previously proposed a preprocessing algorithm which selects only the patterns in the overlap region around the decision boundary, based on neighborhood properties [8], [9], [10]. The k-nearest neighbors’ class label entropy for each pattern was used to estimate the pattern’s proximity to the decision boundary. The value of parameter k is critical, yet has been determined by a rather ad-hoc fashion. We propose in this paper a systematic procedure to determine k and show its effectiveness through experiments.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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On the Representation, Learning and Transfer of Spatio-Temporal Movement Characteristics

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Mezger, J., Giese, MA.

In Humanoids Proceedings, pages: 0-0, Humanoids Proceedings, July 2003, electronical version (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we present a learning-based approach for the modelling of complex movement sequences. Based on the method of Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models (STMMS. We derive a hierarchical algorithm that, in a first step, identifies automatically movement elements in movement sequences based on a coarse spatio-temporal description, and in a second step models these movement primitives by approximation through linear combinations of learned example movement trajectories. We describe the different steps of the algorithm and show how it can be applied for modelling and synthesis of complex sequences of human movements that contain movement elements with variable style. The proposed method is demonstrated on different applications of movement representation relevant for imitation learning of movement styles in humanoid robotics.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Loss Functions and Optimization Methods for Discriminative Learning of Label Sequences

Altun, Y., Johnson, M., Hofmann, T.

In pages: 145-152, (Editors: Collins, M. , M. Steedman), ACL, East Stroudsburg, PA, USA, Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP) , July 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Discriminative models have been of interest in the NLP community in recent years. Previous research has shown that they are advantageous over generative models. In this paper, we investigate how different objective functions and optimization methods affect the performance of the classifiers in the discriminative learning framework. We focus on the sequence labelling problem, particularly POS tagging and NER tasks. Our experiments show that changing the objective function is not as effective as changing the features included in the model.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Time Complexity Analysis of Fast Pattern Selection Algorithm for SVM

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 221-231, Korean Data Mining Conference, June 2003 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Ladungsträgerdynamik in optisch angeregten GaAs-Quantendrähten:Relaxation und Transport

Pfingsten, T.

Biologische Kybernetik, Institut für Festkörpertheorie, WWU Münster, June 2003 (diplomathesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Fast Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In PAKDD 2003, pages: 376-387, (Editors: Whang, K.-Y. , J. Jeon, K. Shim, J. Srivastava), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, May 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training SVM requires large memory and long cpu time when the pattern set is large. To alleviate the computational burden in SVM training, we propose a fast preprocessing algorithm which selects only the patterns near the decision boundary. Preliminary simulation results were promising: Up to two orders of magnitude, training time reduction was achieved including the preprocessing, without any loss in classification accuracies.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Scaling Reinforcement Learning Paradigms for Motor Control

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In JSNC 2003, 10, pages: 1-7, 10th Joint Symposium on Neural Computation (JSNC), May 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning offers a general framework to explain reward related learning in artificial and biological motor control. However, current reinforcement learning methods rarely scale to high dimensional movement systems and mainly operate in discrete, low dimensional domains like game-playing, artificial toy problems, etc. This drawback makes them unsuitable for application to human or bio-mimetic motor control. In this poster, we look at promising approaches that can potentially scale and suggest a novel formulation of the actor-critic algorithm which takes steps towards alleviating the current shortcomings. We argue that methods based on greedy policies are not likely to scale into high-dimensional domains as they are problematic when used with function approximation – a must when dealing with continuous domains. We adopt the path of direct policy gradient based policy improvements since they avoid the problems of unstabilizing dynamics encountered in traditional value iteration based updates. While regular policy gradient methods have demonstrated promising results in the domain of humanoid notor control, we demonstrate that these methods can be significantly improved using the natural policy gradient instead of the regular policy gradient. Based on this, it is proved that Kakade’s ‘average natural policy gradient’ is indeed the true natural gradient. A general algorithm for estimating the natural gradient, the Natural Actor-Critic algorithm, is introduced. This algorithm converges with probability one to the nearest local minimum in Riemannian space of the cost function. The algorithm outperforms nonnatural policy gradients by far in a cart-pole balancing evaluation, and offers a promising route for the development of reinforcement learning for truly high-dimensionally continuous state-action systems. Keywords: Reinforcement learning, neurodynamic programming, actorcritic methods, policy gradient methods, natural policy gradient

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A case based comparison of identification with neural network and Gaussian process models.

Kocijan, J., Banko, B., Likar, B., Girard, A., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS 2003, 1, pages: 137-142, (Editors: Ruano, E.A.), Proceedings of the International Conference on Intelligent Control Systems and Signal Processing ICONS, April 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper an alternative approach to black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems is compared with the more established approach of using artificial neural networks. The Gaussian process prior approach is a representative of non-parametric modelling approaches. It was compared on a pH process modelling case study. The purpose of modelling was to use the model for control design. The comparison revealed that even though Gaussian process models can be effectively used for modelling dynamic systems caution has to be axercised when signals are selected.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]