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2006


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Kernel extrapolation

Vishwanathan, SVN., Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Smola, AJ.

Neurocomputing, 69(7-9):721-729, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present a framework for efficient extrapolation of reduced rank approximations, graph kernels, and locally linear embeddings (LLE) to unseen data. We also present a principled method to combine many of these kernels and then extrapolate them. Central to our method is a theorem for matrix approximation, and an extension of the representer theorem to handle multiple joint regularization constraints. Experiments in protein classification demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

Web DOI [BibTex]

2006

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Properties of Kernel Principal Component Analysis

Blanchard, G., Bousquet, O., Zwald, L.

Machine Learning, 66(2-3):259-294, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We study the properties of the eigenvalues of Gram matrices in a non-asymptotic setting. Using local Rademacher averages, we provide data-dependent and tight bounds for their convergence towards eigenvalues of the corresponding kernel operator. We perform these computations in a functional analytic framework which allows to deal implicitly with reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of infinite dimension. This can have applications to various kernel algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM). We focus on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and, using such techniques, we obtain sharp excess risk bounds for the reconstruction error. In these bounds, the dependence on the decay of the spectrum and on the closeness of successive eigenvalues is made explicit.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Network-based de-noising improves prediction from microarray data

Kato, T., Murata, Y., Miura, K., Asai, K., Horton, P., Tsuda, K., Fujibuchi, W.

BMC Bioinformatics, 7(Suppl. 1):S4-S4, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
Prediction of human cell response to anti-cancer drugs (compounds) from microarray data is a challenging problem, due to the noise properties of microarrays as well as the high variance of living cell responses to drugs. Hence there is a strong need for more practical and robust methods than standard methods for real-value prediction. We devised an extended version of the off-subspace noise-reduction (de-noising) method to incorporate heterogeneous network data such as sequence similarity or protein-protein interactions into a single framework. Using that method, we first de-noise the gene expression data for training and test data and also the drug-response data for training data. Then we predict the unknown responses of each drug from the de-noised input data. For ascertaining whether de-noising improves prediction or not, we carry out 12-fold cross-validation for assessment of the prediction performance. We use the Pearson‘s correlation coefficient between the true and predicted respon se values as the prediction performance. De-noising improves the prediction performance for 65% of drugs. Furthermore, we found that this noise reduction method is robust and effective even when a large amount of artificial noise is added to the input data. We found that our extended off-subspace noise-reduction method combining heterogeneous biological data is successful and quite useful to improve prediction of human cell cancer drug responses from microarray data.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Data mining problems and solutions for response modeling in CRM

Cho, S., Shin, H., Yu, E., Ha, K., MacLachlan, D.

Entrue Journal of Information Technology, 5(1):55-64, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present three data mining problems that are often encountered in building a response model. They are robust modeling, variable selection and data selection. Respective algorithmic solutions are given. They are bagging based ensemble, genetic algorithm based wrapper approach and nearest neighbor-based data selection in that order. A real world data set from Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, or DMEF4, is used to show their effectiveness. Proposed methods were found to solve the problems in a practical way.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Model-based Design Analysis and Yield Optimization

Pfingsten, T., Herrmann, D., Rasmussen, C.

IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, 19(4):475-486, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Fluctuations are inherent to any fabrication process. Integrated circuits and micro-electro-mechanical systems are particularly affected by these variations, and due to high quality requirements the effect on the devices’ performance has to be understood quantitatively. In recent years it has become possible to model the performance of such complex systems on the basis of design specifications, and model-based Sensitivity Analysis has made its way into industrial engineering. We show how an efficient Bayesian approach, using a Gaussian process prior, can replace the commonly used brute-force Monte Carlo scheme, making it possible to apply the analysis to computationally costly models. We introduce a number of global, statistically justified sensitivity measures for design analysis and optimization. Two models of integrated systems serve us as case studies to introduce the analysis and to assess its convergence properties. We show that the Bayesian Monte Carlo scheme can save costly simulation runs and can ensure a reliable accuracy of the analysis.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Prenatal development of ocular dominance and orientation maps in a self-organizing model of V1

Jegelka, S., Bednar, J., Miikkulainen, R.

Neurocomputing, 69(10-12):1291-1296, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
How orientation and ocular-dominance (OD) maps develop before visual experience begins is controversial. Possible influences include molecular signals and spontaneous activity, but their contributions remain unclear. This paper presents LISSOM simulations suggesting that previsual spontaneous activity alone is sufficient for realistic OR and OD maps to develop. Individual maps develop robustly with various previsual patterns, and are aided by background noise. However, joint OR/OD maps depend crucially on how correlated the patterns are between eyes, even over brief initial periods. Therefore, future biological experiments should account for multiple activity sources, and should measure map interactions rather than maps of single features.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Weighting of experimental evidence in macromolecular structure determination

Habeck, M., Rieping, W., Nilges, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(6):1756-1761, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
The determination of macromolecular structures requires weighting of experimental evidence relative to prior physical information. Although it can critically affect the quality of the calculated structures, experimental data are routinely weighted on an empirical basis. At present, cross-validation is the most rigorous method to determine the best weight. We describe a general method to adaptively weight experimental data in the course of structure calculation. It is further shown that the necessity to define weights for the data can be completely alleviated. We demonstrate the method on a structure calculation from NMR data and find that the resulting structures are optimal in terms of accuracy and structural quality. Our method is devoid of the bias imposed by an empirical choice of the weight and has some advantages over estimating the weight by cross-validation.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Cross-Validation Optimization for Structured Hessian Kernel Methods

Seeger, M., Chapelle, O.

Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, February 2006 (techreport)

Abstract
We address the problem of learning hyperparameters in kernel methods for which the Hessian of the objective is structured. We propose an approximation to the cross-validation log likelihood whose gradient can be computed analytically, solving the hyperparameter learning problem efficiently through nonlinear optimization. Crucially, our learning method is based entirely on matrix-vector multiplication primitives with the kernel matrices and their derivatives, allowing straightforward specialization to new kernels or to large datasets. When applied to the problem of multi-way classification, our method scales linearly in the number of classes and gives rise to state-of-the-art results on a remote imaging task.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Subspace identification through blind source separation

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(2):100-103, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Given a linear and instantaneous mixture model, we prove that for blind source separation (BSS) algorithms based on mutual information, only sources with non-Gaussian distribution are consistently reconstructed independent of initial conditions. This allows the identification of non-Gaussian sources and consequently the identification of signal and noise subspaces through BSS. The results are illustrated with a simple example, and the implications for a variety of signal processing applications, such as denoising and model identification, are discussed.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of Faces in Man and Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(1):143-165, January 2006 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction as a Deflation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(1):45-48, 2006 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Symbol Recognition with Kernel Density Matching

Zhang, W., Wenyin, L., Zhang, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 28(12):2020-2024, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to similarity assessment for graphic symbols. Symbols are represented as 2D kernel densities and their similarity is measured by the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Symbol orientation is found by gradient-based angle searching or independent component analysis. Experimental results show the outstanding performance of this approach in various situations.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An adaptive method for subband decomposition ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Neural Computation, 18(1):191-223, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Subband decomposition ICA (SDICA), an extension of ICA, assumes that each source is represented as the sum of some independent subcomponents and dependent subcomponents, which have different frequency bands. In this article, we first investigate the feasibility of separating the SDICA mixture in an adaptive manner. Second, we develop an adaptive method for SDICA, namely band-selective ICA (BS-ICA), which finds the mixing matrix and the estimate of the source independent subcomponents. This method is based on the minimization of the mutual information between outputs. Some practical issues are discussed. For better applicability, a scheme to avoid the high-dimensional score function difference is given. Third, we investigate one form of the overcomplete ICA problems with sources having specific frequency characteristics, which BS-ICA can also be used to solve. Experimental results illustrate the success of the proposed method for solving both SDICA and the over-complete ICA problems.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


Thumb xl screen shot 2012 06 06 at 11.31.38 am
Implicit Wiener Series, Part II: Regularised estimation

Gehler, P., Franz, M.

(148), Max Planck Institute, 2006 (techreport)

pdf [BibTex]

2002


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

2002

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel Dependency Estimation

Weston, J., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B., Vapnik, V.

(98), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, August 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
We consider the learning problem of finding a dependency between a general class of objects and another, possibly different, general class of objects. The objects can be for example: vectors, images, strings, trees or graphs. Such a task is made possible by employing similarity measures in both input and output spaces using kernel functions, thus embedding the objects into vector spaces. Output kernels also make it possible to encode prior information and/or invariances in the loss function in an elegant way. We experimentally validate our approach on several tasks: mapping strings to strings, pattern recognition, and reconstruction from partial images.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Co-Clustering of Biological Networks and Gene Expression Data

Hanisch, D., Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, (Suppl 1):145S-154S, 18, July 2002 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Large scale gene expression data are often analysed by clustering genes based on gene expression data alone, though a priori knowledge in the form of biological networks is available. The use of this additional information promises to improve exploratory analysis considerably. Results: We propose constructing a distance function which combines information from expression data and biological networks. Based on this function, we compute a joint clustering of genes and vertices of the network. This general approach is elaborated for metabolic networks. We define a graph distance function on such networks and combine it with a correlation-based distance function for gene expression measurements. A hierarchical clustering and an associated statistical measure is computed to arrive at a reasonable number of clusters. Our method is validated using expression data of the yeast diauxic shift. The resulting clusters are easily interpretable in terms of the biochemical network and the gene expression data and suggest that our method is able to automatically identify processes that are relevant under the measured conditions.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Global Geometry of SVM Classifiers

Zhou, D., Xiao, B., Zhou, H., Dai, R.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, June 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
We construct an geometry framework for any norm Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers. Within this framework, separating hyperplanes, dual descriptions and solutions of SVM classifiers are constructed by a purely geometric fashion. In contrast with the optimization theory used in SVM classifiers, we have no complicated computations any more. Each step in our theory is guided by elegant geometric intuitions.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Computationally Efficient Face Detection

Romdhani, S., Torr, P., Schölkopf, B., Blake, A.

(MSR-TR-2002-69), Microsoft Research, June 2002 (techreport)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Confidence measures for protein fold recognition

Sommer, I., Zien, A., von Ohsen, N., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 18(6):802-812, June 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The contributions of color to recognition memory for natural scenes

Wichmann, F., Sharpe, L., Gegenfurtner, K.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 28(3):509-520, May 2002 (article)

Abstract
The authors used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the influence of color information on visual memory for images of natural scenes. Subjects performed 5-10% better for colored than for black-and-white images independent of exposure duration. Experiment 2 indicated little influence of contrast once the images were suprathreshold, and Experiment 3 revealed that performance worsened when images were presented in color and tested in black and white, or vice versa, leading to the conclusion that the surface property color is part of the memory representation. Experiments 4 and 5 exclude the possibility that the superior recognition memory for colored images results solely from attentional factors or saliency. Finally, the recognition memory advantage disappears for falsely colored images of natural scenes: The improvement in recognition memory depends on the color congruence of presented images with learned knowledge about the color gamut found within natural scenes. The results can be accounted for within a multiple memory systems framework.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel-based nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

EU-Project BLISS, January 2002 (techreport)

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Training invariant support vector machines

DeCoste, D., Schölkopf, B.

Machine Learning, 46(1-3):161-190, January 2002 (article)

Abstract
Practical experience has shown that in order to obtain the best possible performance, prior knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand ought to be incorporated into the training procedure. We describe and review all known methods for doing so in support vector machines, provide experimental results, and discuss their respective merits. One of the significant new results reported in this work is our recent achievement of the lowest reported test error on the well-known MNIST digit recognition benchmark task, with SVM training times that are also significantly faster than previous SVM methods.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Model Selection for Small Sample Regression

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bengio, Y.

Machine Learning, 48(1-3):9-23, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Model selection is an important ingredient of many machine learning algorithms, in particular when the sample size in small, in order to strike the right trade-off between overfitting and underfitting. Previous classical results for linear regression are based on an asymptotic analysis. We present a new penalization method for performing model selection for regression that is appropriate even for small samples. Our penalization is based on an accurate estimator of the ratio of the expected training error and the expected generalization error, in terms of the expected eigenvalues of the input covariance matrix.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency

Bird, C., Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1267-1273, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The detectability of contrast increments was measured as a function of the contrast of a masking or “pedestal” grating at a number of different spatial frequencies ranging from 2 to 16 cycles per degree of visual angle. The pedestal grating always had the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase as the signal. The shape of the contrast increment threshold versus pedestal contrast (TvC) functions depend of the performance level used to define the “threshold,” but when both axes are normalized by the contrast corresponding to 75% correct detection at each frequency, the (TvC) functions at a given performance level are identical. Confidence intervals on the slope of the rising part of the TvC functions are so wide that it is not possible with our data to reject Weber’s Law.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A compression approach to support vector model selection

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O., Schölkopf, B.

(101), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, 2002, see more detailed JMLR version (techreport)

Abstract
In this paper we investigate connections between statistical learning theory and data compression on the basis of support vector machine (SVM) model selection. Inspired by several generalization bounds we construct ``compression coefficients'' for SVMs, which measure the amount by which the training labels can be compressed by some classification hypothesis. The main idea is to relate the coding precision of this hypothesis to the width of the margin of the SVM. The compression coefficients connect well known quantities such as the radius-margin ratio R^2/rho^2, the eigenvalues of the kernel matrix and the number of support vectors. To test whether they are useful in practice we ran model selection experiments on several real world datasets. As a result we found that compression coefficients can fairly accurately predict the parameters for which the test error is minimized.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Bennett Concentration Inequality and Its Application to Suprema of Empirical Processes

Bousquet, O.

C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. I, 334, pages: 495-500, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We introduce new concentration inequalities for functions on product spaces. They allow to obtain a Bennett type deviation bound for suprema of empirical processes indexed by upper bounded functions. The result is an improvement on Rio's version \cite{Rio01b} of Talagrand's inequality \cite{Talagrand96} for equidistributed variables.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Numerical evolution of axisymmetric, isolated systems in general relativity

Frauendiener, J., Hein, M.

Physical Review D, 66, pages: 124004-124004, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We describe in this article a new code for evolving axisymmetric isolated systems in general relativity. Such systems are described by asymptotically flat space-times, which have the property that they admit a conformal extension. We are working directly in the extended conformal manifold and solve numerically Friedrich's conformal field equations, which state that Einstein's equations hold in the physical space-time. Because of the compactness of the conformal space-time the entire space-time can be calculated on a finite numerical grid. We describe in detail the numerical scheme, especially the treatment of the axisymmetry and the boundary.

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for biological sequences

Tsuda, K., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 1):268-275, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Feature Selection and Transduction for Prediction of Molecular Bioactivity for Drug Design

Weston, J., Perez-Cruz, F., Bousquet, O., Chapelle, O., Elisseeff, A., Schölkopf, B.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics / Biowulf Technologies, 2002 (techreport)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Stability and Generalization

Bousquet, O., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 2, pages: 499-526, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We define notions of stability for learning algorithms and show how to use these notions to derive generalization error bounds based on the empirical error and the leave-one-out error. The methods we use can be applied in the regression framework as well as in the classification one when the classifier is obtained by thresholding a real-valued function. We study the stability properties of large classes of learning algorithms such as regularization based algorithms. In particular we focus on Hilbert space regularization and Kullback-Leibler regularization. We demonstrate how to apply the results to SVM for regression and classification.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Subspace information criterion for non-quadratic regularizers – model selection for sparse regressors

Tsuda, K., Sugiyama, M., Müller, K.

IEEE Trans Neural Networks, 13(1):70-80, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Modeling splicing sites with pairwise correlations

Arita, M., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 2):27-34, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Observations on the Nyström Method for Gaussian Process Prediction

Williams, C., Rasmussen, C., Schwaighofer, A., Tresp, V.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
A number of methods for speeding up Gaussian Process (GP) prediction have been proposed, including the Nystr{\"o}m method of Williams and Seeger (2001). In this paper we focus on two issues (1) the relationship of the Nystr{\"o}m method to the Subset of Regressors method (Poggio and Girosi 1990; Luo and Wahba, 1997) and (2) understanding in what circumstances the Nystr{\"o}m approximation would be expected to provide a good approximation to exact GP regression.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Perfusion Quantification using Gaussian Process Deconvolution

Andersen, IK., Szymkowiak, A., Rasmussen, CE., Hanson, LG., Marstrand, JR., Larsson, HBW., Hansen, LK.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, (48):351-361, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The quantification of perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging requires deconvolution to obtain the residual impulse-response function (IRF). Here, a method using a Gaussian process for deconvolution, GPD, is proposed. The fact that the IRF is smooth is incorporated as a constraint in the method. The GPD method, which automatically estimates the noise level in each voxel, has the advantage that model parameters are optimized automatically. The GPD is compared to singular value decomposition (SVD) using a common threshold for the singular values and to SVD using a threshold optimized according to the noise level in each voxel. The comparison is carried out using artificial data as well as using data from healthy volunteers. It is shown that GPD is comparable to SVD variable optimized threshold when determining the maximum of the IRF, which is directly related to the perfusion. GPD provides a better estimate of the entire IRF. As the signal to noise ratio increases or the time resolution of the measurements increases, GPD is shown to be superior to SVD. This is also found for large distribution volumes.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Tracking a Small Set of Experts by Mixing Past Posteriors

Bousquet, O., Warmuth, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3, pages: 363-396, (Editors: Long, P.), 2002 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we examine on-line learning problems in which the target concept is allowed to change over time. In each trial a master algorithm receives predictions from a large set of n experts. Its goal is to predict almost as well as the best sequence of such experts chosen off-line by partitioning the training sequence into k+1 sections and then choosing the best expert for each section. We build on methods developed by Herbster and Warmuth and consider an open problem posed by Freund where the experts in the best partition are from a small pool of size m. Since k >> m, the best expert shifts back and forth between the experts of the small pool. We propose algorithms that solve this open problem by mixing the past posteriors maintained by the master algorithm. We relate the number of bits needed for encoding the best partition to the loss bounds of the algorithms. Instead of paying log n for choosing the best expert in each section we first pay log (n choose m) bits in the bounds for identifying the pool of m experts and then log m bits per new section. In the bounds we also pay twice for encoding the boundaries of the sections.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A femoral arteriovenous shunt facilitates arterial whole blood sampling in animals

Weber, B., Burger, C., Biro, P., Buck, A.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging, 29, pages: 319-323, 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with pulse-trains in pink noise

Henning, G., Bird, C., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1259-1266, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Detection performance was measured with sinusoidal and pulse-train gratings. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train, or line gratings, contained at least 8 harmonics all at equal contrast, they were no more detectable than their most detectable component. The addition of broadband pink noise designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train made the pulse train about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with a pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not affect the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that obtained with its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Choosing Multiple Parameters for Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bousquet, O., Mukherjee, S.

Machine Learning, 46(1):131-159, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The problem of automatically tuning multiple parameters for pattern recognition Support Vector Machines (SVM) is considered. This is done by minimizing some estimates of the generalization error of SVMs using a gradient descent algorithm over the set of parameters. Usual methods for choosing parameters, based on exhaustive search become intractable as soon as the number of parameters exceeds two. Some experimental results assess the feasibility of our approach for a large number of parameters (more than 100) and demonstrate an improvement of generalization performance.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]