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2014


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Policy Search For Learning Robot Control Using Sparse Data

Bischoff, B., Nguyen-Tuong, D., van Hoof, H., McHutchon, A., Rasmussen, C., Knoll, A., Peters, J., Deisenroth, M.

In Proceedings of 2014 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, pages: 3882-3887, IEEE, ICRA, 2014 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

2014

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Learning to Unscrew a Light Bulb from Demonstrations

Manschitz, S., Kober, J., Gienger, M., Peters, J.

In Proceedings for the joint conference of ISR 2014, 45th International Symposium on Robotics and Robotik 2014, 2014 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Towards Neurofeedback Training of Associative Brain Areas for Stroke Rehabilitation

Özdenizci, O., Meyer, T., Cetin, M., Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In Proceedings of the 6th International Brain-Computer Interface Conference, (Editors: G Müller-Putz and G Bauernfeind and C Brunner and D Steyrl and S Wriessnegger and R Scherer), 2014 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Sampling for Inference in Probabilistic Models with Fast Bayesian Quadrature

Gunter, T., Osborne, M., Garnett, R., Hennig, P., Roberts, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, pages: 2789-2797, (Editors: Z. Ghahramani, M. Welling, C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence and K.Q. Weinberger), Curran Associates, Inc., 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014 (inproceedings)

Web link (url) [BibTex]

Web link (url) [BibTex]


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Scalable Kernel Methods via Doubly Stochastic Gradients

Dai, B., Xie, B., He, N., Liang, Y., Raj, A., Balcan, M., Song, L.

Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, pages: 3041-3049, (Editors: Z. Ghahramani, M. Welling, C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence and K.Q. Weinberger), 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning Economic Parameters from Revealed Preferences

Balcan, M., Daniely, A., Mehta, R., Urner, R., Vazirani, V. V.

In Web and Internet Economics - 10th International Conference, 8877, pages: 338-353, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: Liu, T.-Y. and Qi, Q. and Ye, Y.), WINE, 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Nonconvex Proximal Splitting with Computational Errors

Sra, S.

In Regularization, Optimization, Kernels, and Support Vector Machines, pages: 83-102, 4, (Editors: Suykens, J. A. K., Signoretto, M. and Argyriou, A.), CRC Press, 2014 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Fast Newton methods for the group fused lasso

Wytock, M., Sra, S., Kolter, J. Z.

In Proceedings of the 30th Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence, pages: 888-897, (Editors: Zhang, N. L. and Tian, J.), AUAI Press, UAI, 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Mind the Gap: Subspace based Hierarchical Domain Adaptation

Raj, A., Namboodiri, V., Tuytelaars, T.

Transfer and Multi-task learning Workshop in Advances in Neural Information System Conference 27, 2014 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Localized Complexities for Transductive Learning

Tolstikhin, I., Blanchard, G., Kloft, M.

In Proceedings of the 27th Conference on Learning Theory, 35, pages: 857-884, (Editors: Balcan, M.-F. and Feldman, V. and Szepesvári, C.), JMLR, COLT, 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Active Learning - Modern Learning Theory

Balcan, M., Urner, R.

In Encyclopedia of Algorithms, (Editors: Kao, M.-Y.), Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2014 (incollection)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Efficient Structured Matrix Rank Minimization

Yu, A. W., Ma, W., Yu, Y., Carbonell, J., Sra, S.

Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, pages: 1350-1358, (Editors: Z. Ghahramani, M. Welling, C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence and K.Q. Weinberger), Curran Associates, Inc., 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Towards building a Crowd-Sourced Sky Map

Lang, D., Hogg, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the Seventeenth International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, JMLR W\&CP 33, pages: 549–557, (Editors: S. Kaski and J. Corander), JMLR.org, AISTATS, 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Incremental Local Gaussian Regression

Meier, F., Hennig, P., Schaal, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 27, pages: 972-980, (Editors: Z. Ghahramani, M. Welling, C. Cortes, N.D. Lawrence and K.Q. Weinberger), 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

PDF link (url) [BibTex]

PDF link (url) [BibTex]


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Learning to Deblur

Schuler, C. J., Hirsch, M., Harmeling, S., Schölkopf, B.

In NIPS 2014 Deep Learning and Representation Learning Workshop, 28th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Efficient Bayesian Local Model Learning for Control

Meier, F., Hennig, P., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 2244 - 2249, IROS, 2014, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Model-based control is essential for compliant controland force control in many modern complex robots, like humanoidor disaster robots. Due to many unknown and hard tomodel nonlinearities, analytical models of such robots are oftenonly very rough approximations. However, modern optimizationcontrollers frequently depend on reasonably accurate models,and degrade greatly in robustness and performance if modelerrors are too large. For a long time, machine learning hasbeen expected to provide automatic empirical model synthesis,yet so far, research has only generated feasibility studies butno learning algorithms that run reliably on complex robots.In this paper, we combine two promising worlds of regressiontechniques to generate a more powerful regression learningsystem. On the one hand, locally weighted regression techniquesare computationally efficient, but hard to tune due to avariety of data dependent meta-parameters. On the other hand,Bayesian regression has rather automatic and robust methods toset learning parameters, but becomes quickly computationallyinfeasible for big and high-dimensional data sets. By reducingthe complexity of Bayesian regression in the spirit of local modellearning through variational approximations, we arrive at anovel algorithm that is computationally efficient and easy toinitialize for robust learning. Evaluations on several datasetsdemonstrate very good learning performance and the potentialfor a general regression learning tool for robotics.

PDF link (url) DOI [BibTex]

PDF link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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The sample complexity of agnostic learning under deterministic labels

Ben-David, S., Urner, R.

In Proceedings of the 27th Conference on Learning Theory, 35, pages: 527-542, (Editors: Balcan, M.-F. and Feldman, V. and Szepesvári, C.), JMLR, COLT, 2014 (inproceedings)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Towards an optimal stochastic alternating direction method of multipliers

Azadi, S., Sra, S.

Proceedings of the 31st International Conference on Machine Learning, 32, pages: 620-628, (Editors: Xing, E. P. and Jebara, T.), JMLR, ICML, 2014 (conference)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Open Problem: Finding Good Cascade Sampling Processes for the Network Inference Problem

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Song, L., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 27th Conference on Learning Theory, 35, pages: 1276-1279, (Editors: Balcan, M.-F. and Szepesvári, C.), JMLR.org, COLT, 2014 (conference)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Curiosity-driven learning with Context Tree Weighting

Peng, Z, Braun, DA

pages: 366-367, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 4th Joint IEEE International Conference on Development and Learning and on Epigenetic Robotics (IEEE ICDL-EPIROB), October 2014 (conference)

Abstract
In the first simulation, the intrinsic motivation of the agent was given by measuring learning progress through reduction in informational surprise (Figure 1 A-C). This way the agent should first learn the action that is easiest to learn (a1), and then switch to other actions that still allow for learning (a2) and ignore actions that cannot be learned at all (a3). This is exactly what we found in our simple environment. Compared to the original developmental learning algorithm based on learning progress proposed by Oudeyer [2], our Context Tree Weighting approach does not require local experts to do prediction, rather it learns the conditional probability distribution over observations given action in one structure. In the second simulation, the intrinsic motivation of the agent was given by measuring compression progress through improvement in compressibility (Figure 1 D-F). The agent behaves similarly: the agent first concentrates on the action with the most predictable consequence and then switches over to the regular action where the consequence is more difficult to predict, but still learnable. Unlike the previous simulation, random actions are also interesting to some extent because the compressed symbol strings use 8-bit representations, while only 2 bits are required for our observation space. Our preliminary results suggest that Context Tree Weighting might provide a useful representation to study problems of development.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Monte Carlo methods for exact & efficient solution of the generalized optimality equations

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA, Tishby, N

pages: 4322-4327, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA), June 2014 (conference)

Abstract
Previous work has shown that classical sequential decision making rules, including expectimax and minimax, are limit cases of a more general class of bounded rational planning problems that trade off the value and the complexity of the solution, as measured by its information divergence from a given reference. This allows modeling a range of novel planning problems having varying degrees of control due to resource constraints, risk-sensitivity, trust and model uncertainty. However, so far it has been unclear in what sense information constraints relate to the complexity of planning. In this paper, we introduce Monte Carlo methods to solve the generalized optimality equations in an efficient \& exact way when the inverse temperatures in a generalized decision tree are of the same sign. These methods highlight a fundamental relation between inverse temperatures and the number of Monte Carlo proposals. In particular, it is seen that the number of proposals is essentially independent of the size of the decision tree.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2007


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Towards compliant humanoids: an experimental assessment of suitable task space position/orientation controllers

Nakanishi, J., Mistry, M., Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In IROS 2007, 2007, pages: 2520-2527, (Editors: Grant, E. , T. C. Henderson), IEEE Service Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, November 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Compliant control will be a prerequisite for humanoid robotics if these robots are supposed to work safely and robustly in human and/or dynamic environments. One view of compliant control is that a robot should control a minimal number of degrees-of-freedom (DOFs) directly, i.e., those relevant DOFs for the task, and keep the remaining DOFs maximally compliant, usually in the null space of the task. This view naturally leads to task space control. However, surprisingly few implementations of task space control can be found in actual humanoid robots. This paper makes a first step towards assessing the usefulness of task space controllers for humanoids by investigating which choices of controllers are available and what inherent control characteristics they have—this treatment will concern position and orientation control, where the latter is based on a quaternion formulation. Empirical evaluations on an anthropomorphic Sarcos master arm illustrate the robustness of the different controllers as well as the eas e of implementing and tuning them. Our extensive empirical results demonstrate that simpler task space controllers, e.g., classical resolved motion rate control or resolved acceleration control can be quite advantageous in face of inevitable modeling errors in model-based control, and that well chosen formulations are easy to implement and quite robust, such that they are useful for humanoids.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

2007

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Sistema avanzato per la classificazione delle aree agricole in immagini ad elevata risoluzione geometrica: applicazione al territorio del Trentino

Arnoldi, E., Bruzzone, L., Carlin, L., Pedron, L., Persello, C.

In pages: 1-6, 11. Conferenza Nazionale ASITA, November 2007 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Performance Stabilization and Improvement in Graph-based Semi-supervised Learning with Ensemble Method and Graph Sharpening

Choi, I., Shin, H.

In Korean Data Mining Society Conference, pages: 257-262, Korean Data Mining Society, Seoul, Korea, Korean Data Mining Society Conference, November 2007 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Discriminative Subsequence Mining for Action Classification

Nowozin, S., BakIr, G., Tsuda, K.

In ICCV 2007, pages: 1919-1923, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 11th IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recent approaches to action classification in videos have used sparse spatio-temporal words encoding local appearance around interesting movements. Most of these approaches use a histogram representation, discarding the temporal order among features. But this ordering information can contain important information about the action itself, e.g. consider the sport disciplines of hurdle race and long jump, where the global temporal order of motions (running, jumping) is important to discriminate between the two. In this work we propose to use a sequential representation which retains this temporal order. Further, we introduce Discriminative Subsequence Mining to find optimal discriminative subsequence patterns. In combination with the LPBoost classifier, this amounts to simultaneously learning a classification function and performing feature selection in the space of all possible feature sequences. The resulting classifier linearly combines a small number of interpretable decision functions, each checking for the presence of a single discriminative pattern. The classifier is benchmarked on the KTH action classification data set and outperforms the best known results in the literature.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Classification for non-invasive Brain-Computer-Interfaces

Eren, S., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

In Automed 2007, pages: 65-66, VDI Verlag, Düsseldorf, Germany, Automed Workshop, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Non-invasive Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BCIs) are devices that infer the intention of human subjects from signals generated by the central nervous system and recorded outside the skull, e.g., by electroencephalography (EEG). They can be used to enable basic communication for patients who are not able to communicate by normal means, e.g., due to neuro-degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (see [Vaughan2003] for a review). One challenge in research on BCIs is minimizing the training time prior to usage of the BCI. Since EEG patterns vary across subjects, it is usually necessary to record a number of trials in which the intention of the user is known to train a classifier. This classifier is subsequently used to infer the intention of the BCI-user. In this paper, we present the application of an unsupervised classification method to a binary noninvasive BCI based on motor imagery. The result is a BCI that does not require any training, since the mapping from EEG pattern changes to the intention of the user is learned online by the BCI without any feedback. We present experimental results from six healthy subjects, three of which display classification errors below 15%. We conclude that unsupervised BCIs are a viable option, but not yet as reliable as supervised BCIs. The rest of this paper is organized as follows. In the Methods section, we first introduce the experimental paradigm. This is followed by a description of the methods used for spatial filtering, feature extraction, and unsupervised classification. We then present the experimental results, and conclude the paper with a brief discussion.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Hilbert Space Embedding for Distributions

Smola, A., Gretton, A., Song, L., Schölkopf, B.

In Algorithmic Learning Theory, Lecture Notes in Computer Science 4754 , pages: 13-31, (Editors: M Hutter and RA Servedio and E Takimoto), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 18th International Conference on Algorithmic Learning Theory (ALT), October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a technique for comparing distributions without the need for density estimation as an intermediate step. Our approach relies on mapping the distributions into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. Applications of this technique can be found in two-sample tests, which are used for determining whether two sets of observations arise from the same distribution, covariate shift correction, local learning, measures of independence, and density estimation.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Cluster Identification in Nearest-Neighbor Graphs

Maier, M., Hein, M., von Luxburg, U.

In ALT 2007, pages: 196-210, (Editors: Hutter, M. , R. A. Servedio, E. Takimoto), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 18th International Conference on Algorithmic Learning Theory, October 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Assume we are given a sample of points from some underlying distribution which contains several distinct clusters. Our goal is to construct a neighborhood graph on the sample points such that clusters are ``identified‘‘: that is, the subgraph induced by points from the same cluster is connected, while subgraphs corresponding to different clusters are not connected to each other. We derive bounds on the probability that cluster identification is successful, and use them to predict ``optimal‘‘ values of k for the mutual and symmetric k-nearest-neighbor graphs. We point out different properties of the mutual and symmetric nearest-neighbor graphs related to the cluster identification problem.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machine Learning for Interdependent and Structured Output Spaces

Altun, Y., Hofmann, T., Tsochantaridis, I.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 85-104, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: Bakir, G. H. , T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V. N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Inducing Metric Violations in Human Similarity Judgements

Laub, J., Macke, J., Müller, K., Wichmann, F.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 777-784, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Attempting to model human categorization and similarity judgements is both a very interesting but also an exceedingly difficult challenge. Some of the difficulty arises because of conflicting evidence whether human categorization and similarity judgements should or should not be modelled as to operate on a mental representation that is essentially metric. Intuitively, this has a strong appeal as it would allow (dis)similarity to be represented geometrically as distance in some internal space. Here we show how a single stimulus, carefully constructed in a psychophysical experiment, introduces l2 violations in what used to be an internal similarity space that could be adequately modelled as Euclidean. We term this one influential data point a conflictual judgement. We present an algorithm of how to analyse such data and how to identify the crucial point. Thus there may not be a strict dichotomy between either a metric or a non-metric internal space but rather degrees to which potentially large subsets of stimuli are represented metrically with a small subset causing a global violation of metricity.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Cross-Validation Optimization for Large Scale Hierarchical Classification Kernel Methods

Seeger, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1233-1240, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a highly efficient framework for kernel multi-class models with a large and structured set of classes. Kernel parameters are learned automatically by maximizing the cross-validation log likelihood, and predictive probabilities are estimated. We demonstrate our approach on large scale text classification tasks with hierarchical class structure, achieving state-of-the-art results in an order of magnitude less time than previous work.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Local Learning Approach for Clustering

Wu, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1529-1536, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a local learning approach for clustering. The basic idea is that a good clustering result should have the property that the cluster label of each data point can be well predicted based on its neighboring data and their cluster labels, using current supervised learning methods. An optimization problem is formulated such that its solution has the above property. Relaxation and eigen-decomposition are applied to solve this optimization problem. We also briefly investigate the parameter selection issue and provide a simple parameter selection method for the proposed algorithm. Experimental results are provided to validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Brisk Kernel ICA

Jegelka, S., Gretton, A.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 225-250, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
Recent approaches to independent component analysis have used kernel independence measures to obtain very good performance in ICA, particularly in areas where classical methods experience difficulty (for instance, sources with near-zero kurtosis). In this chapter, we compare two efficient extensions of these methods for large-scale problems: random subsampling of entries in the Gram matrices used in defining the independence measures, and incomplete Cholesky decomposition of these matrices. We derive closed-form, efficiently computable approximations for the gradients of these measures, and compare their performance on ICA using both artificial and music data. We show that kernel ICA can scale up to much larger problems than yet attempted, and that incomplete Cholesky decomposition performs better than random sampling.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Adaptive Spatial Filters with predefined Region of Interest for EEG based Brain-Computer-Interfaces

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Gramann, K., Buss, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 537-544, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The performance of EEG-based Brain-Computer-Interfaces (BCIs) critically depends on the extraction of features from the EEG carrying information relevant for the classification of different mental states. For BCIs employing imaginary movements of different limbs, the method of Common Spatial Patterns (CSP) has been shown to achieve excellent classification results. The CSP-algorithm however suffers from a lack of robustness, requiring training data without artifacts for good performance. To overcome this lack of robustness, we propose an adaptive spatial filter that replaces the training data in the CSP approach by a-priori information. More specifically, we design an adaptive spatial filter that maximizes the ratio of the variance of the electric field originating in a predefined region of interest (ROI) and the overall variance of the measured EEG. Since it is known that the component of the EEG used for discriminating imaginary movements originates in the motor cortex, we design two adaptive spatial filters with the ROIs centered in the hand areas of the left and right motor cortex. We then use these to classify EEG data recorded during imaginary movements of the right and left hand of three subjects, and show that the adaptive spatial filters outperform the CSP-algorithm, enabling classification rates of up to 94.7 % without artifact rejection.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Predicting Structured Data

Bakir, G., Hofmann, T., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Taskar, B., Vishwanathan, S.

pages: 360, Advances in neural information processing systems, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (book)

Abstract
Machine learning develops intelligent computer systems that are able to generalize from previously seen examples. A new domain of machine learning, in which the prediction must satisfy the additional constraints found in structured data, poses one of machine learning’s greatest challenges: learning functional dependencies between arbitrary input and output domains. This volume presents and analyzes the state of the art in machine learning algorithms and theory in this novel field. The contributors discuss applications as diverse as machine translation, document markup, computational biology, and information extraction, among others, providing a timely overview of an exciting field.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Branch and Bound for Semi-Supervised Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Sindhwani, V., Keerthi, S.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 217-224, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Semi-supervised SVMs (S3VMs) attempt to learn low-density separators by maximizing the margin over labeled and unlabeled examples. The associated optimization problem is non-convex. To examine the full potential of S3VMs modulo local minima problems in current implementations, we apply branch and bound techniques for obtaining exact, globally optimal solutions. Empirical evidence suggests that the globally optimal solution can return excellent generalization performance in situations where other implementations fail completely. While our current implementation is only applicable to small datasets, we discuss variants that can potentially lead to practically useful algorithms.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Kernel Method for the Two-Sample-Problem

Gretton, A., Borgwardt, K., Rasch, M., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 513-520, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose two statistical tests to determine if two samples are from different distributions. Our test statistic is in both cases the distance between the means of the two samples mapped into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS). The first test is based on a large deviation bound for the test statistic, while the second is based on the asymptotic distribution of this statistic. The test statistic can be computed in $O(m^2)$ time. We apply our approach to a variety of problems, including attribute matching for databases using the Hungarian marriage method, where our test performs strongly. We also demonstrate excellent performance when comparing distributions over graphs, for which no alternative tests currently exist.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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An Efficient Method for Gradient-Based Adaptation of Hyperparameters in SVM Models

Keerthi, S., Sindhwani, V., Chapelle, O.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 673-680, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the task of tuning hyperparameters in SVM models based on minimizing a smooth performance validation function, e.g., smoothed k-fold cross-validation error, using non-linear optimization techniques. The key computation in this approach is that of the gradient of the validation function with respect to hyperparameters. We show that for large-scale problems involving a wide choice of kernel-based models and validation functions, this computation can be very efficiently done; often within just a fraction of the training time. Empirical results show that a near-optimal set of hyperparameters can be identified by our approach with very few training rounds and gradient computations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Learning Dense 3D Correspondence

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B., Blanz, V.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 1313-1320, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Establishing correspondence between distinct objects is an important and nontrivial task: correctness of the correspondence hinges on properties which are difficult to capture in an a priori criterion. While previous work has used a priori criteria which in some cases led to very good results, the present paper explores whether it is possible to learn a combination of features that, for a given training set of aligned human heads, characterizes the notion of correct correspondence. By optimizing this criterion, we are then able to compute correspondence and morphs for novel heads.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Optimal Dominant Motion Estimation using Adaptive Search of Transformation Space

Ulges, A., Lampert, CH., Keysers, D., Breuel, TM.

In DAGM 2007, pages: 204-215, (Editors: Hamprecht, F. A., C. Schnörr, B. Jähne), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 29th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition, September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The extraction of a parametric global motion from a motion field is a task with several applications in video processing. We present two probabilistic formulations of the problem and carry out optimization using the RAST algorithm, a geometric matching method novel to motion estimation in video. RAST uses an exhaustive and adaptive search of transformation space and thus gives -- in contrast to local sampling optimization techniques used in the past -- a globally optimal solution. Among other applications, our framework can thus be used as a source of ground truth for benchmarking motion estimation algorithms. Our main contributions are: first, the novel combination of a state-of- the-art MAP criterion for dominant motion estimation with a search procedure that guarantees global optimality. Second, experimental re- sults that illustrate the superior performance of our approach on synthetic flow fields as well as real-world video streams. Third, a significant speedup of the search achieved by extending the mod el with an additional smoothness prior.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Training a Support Vector Machine in the Primal

Chapelle, O.

In Large Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 29-50, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007, This is a slightly updated version of the Neural Computation paper (inbook)

Abstract
Most literature on Support Vector Machines (SVMs) concentrate on the dual optimization problem. In this paper, we would like to point out that the primal problem can also be solved efficiently, both for linear and non-linear SVMs, and that there is no reason to ignore this possibility. On the contrary, from the primal point of view new families of algorithms for large scale SVM training can be investigated.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Approximation Methods for Gaussian Process Regression

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Rasmussen, CE., Williams, CKI.

In Large-Scale Kernel Machines, pages: 203-223, Neural Information Processing, (Editors: Bottou, L. , O. Chapelle, D. DeCoste, J. Weston), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
A wealth of computationally efficient approximation methods for Gaussian process regression have been recently proposed. We give a unifying overview of sparse approximations, following Quiñonero-Candela and Rasmussen (2005), and a brief review of approximate matrix-vector multiplication methods.

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PDF Web [BibTex]


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Large-Scale Kernel Machines

Bottou, L., Chapelle, O., DeCoste, D., Weston, J.

pages: 416, Neural Information Processing Series, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (book)

Abstract
Pervasive and networked computers have dramatically reduced the cost of collecting and distributing large datasets. In this context, machine learning algorithms that scale poorly could simply become irrelevant. We need learning algorithms that scale linearly with the volume of the data while maintaining enough statistical efficiency to outperform algorithms that simply process a random subset of the data. This volume offers researchers and engineers practical solutions for learning from large scale datasets, with detailed descriptions of algorithms and experiments carried out on realistically large datasets. At the same time it offers researchers information that can address the relative lack of theoretical grounding for many useful algorithms. After a detailed description of state-of-the-art support vector machine technology, an introduction of the essential concepts discussed in the volume, and a comparison of primal and dual optimization techniques, the book progresses from well-understood techniques to more novel and controversial approaches. Many contributors have made their code and data available online for further experimentation. Topics covered include fast implementations of known algorithms, approximations that are amenable to theoretical guarantees, and algorithms that perform well in practice but are difficult to analyze theoretically.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Solving Deep Memory POMDPs with Recurrent Policy Gradients

Wierstra, D., Förster, A., Peters, J., Schmidhuber, J.

In ICANN‘07, pages: 697-706, Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents Recurrent Policy Gradients, a modelfree reinforcement learning (RL) method creating limited-memory stochastic policies for partially observable Markov decision problems (POMDPs) that require long-term memories of past observations. The approach involves approximating a policy gradient for a Recurrent Neural Network (RNN) by backpropagating return-weighted characteristic eligibilities through time. Using a “Long Short-Term Memory” architecture, we are able to outperform other RL methods on two important benchmark tasks. Furthermore, we show promising results on a complex car driving simulation task.

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PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Density Estimation of Structured Outputs in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces

Altun, Y., Smola, A.

In Predicting Structured Data, pages: 283-300, Advances in neural information processing systems, (Editors: BakIr, G. H., T. Hofmann, B. Schölkopf, A. J. Smola, B. Taskar, S. V.N. Vishwanathan), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, September 2007 (inbook)

Abstract
In this paper we study the problem of estimating conditional probability distributions for structured output prediction tasks in Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Spaces. More specically, we prove decomposition results for undirected graphical models, give constructions for kernels, and show connections to Gaussian Process classi- cation. Finally we present ecient means of solving the optimization problem and apply this to label sequence learning. Experiments on named entity recognition and pitch accent prediction tasks demonstrate the competitiveness of our approach.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Output Grouping using Dirichlet Mixtures of Linear Gaussian State-Space Models

Chiappa, S., Barber, D.

In ISPA 2007, pages: 446-451, IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 5th International Symposium on Image and Signal Processing and Analysis, September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider a model to cluster the components of a vector time-series. The task is to assign each component of the vector time-series to a single cluster, basing this assignment on the simultaneous dynamical similarity of the component to other components in the cluster. This is in contrast to the more familiar task of clustering a set of time-series based on global measures of their similarity. The model is based on a Dirichlet Mixture of Linear Gaussian State-Space models (LGSSMs), in which each LGSSM is treated with a prior to encourage the simplest explanation. The resulting model is approximated using a ‘collapsed’ variational Bayes implementation.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Manifold Denoising

Hein, M., Maier, M.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 561-568, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , J. Platt, T. Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twentieth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the problem of denoising a noisily sampled submanifold $M$ in $R^d$, where the submanifold $M$ is a priori unknown and we are only given a noisy point sample. The presented denoising algorithm is based on a graph-based diffusion process of the point sample. We analyze this diffusion process using recent results about the convergence of graph Laplacians. In the experiments we show that our method is capable of dealing with non-trivial high-dimensional noise. Moreover using the denoising algorithm as pre-processing method we can improve the results of a semi-supervised learning algorithm.

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PDF Web [BibTex]


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How to Find Interesting Locations in Video: A Spatiotemporal Interest Point Detector Learned from Human Eye movements

Kienzle, W., Schölkopf, B., Wichmann, F., Franz, M.

In Pattern Recognition, pages: 405-414, (Editors: FA Hamprecht and C Schnörr and B Jähne), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 29th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition (DAGM), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Interest point detection in still images is a well-studied topic in computer vision. In the spatiotemporal domain, however, it is still unclear which features indicate useful interest points. In this paper we approach the problem by emph{learning} a detector from examples: we record eye movements of human subjects watching video sequences and train a neural network to predict which locations are likely to become eye movement targets. We show that our detector outperforms current spatiotemporal interest point architectures on a standard classification dataset.

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PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Bayesian Inference for Sparse Generalized Linear Models

Seeger, M., Gerwinn, S., Bethge, M.

In ECML 2007, pages: 298-309, Lecture Notes in Computer Science ; 4701, (Editors: Kok, J. N., J. Koronacki, R. Lopez de Mantaras, S. Matwin, D. Mladenic, A. Skowron), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 18th European Conference on Machine Learning, September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a framework for efficient, accurate approximate Bayesian inference in generalized linear models (GLMs), based on the expectation propagation (EP) technique. The parameters can be endowed with a factorizing prior distribution, encoding properties such as sparsity or non-negativity. The central role of posterior log-concavity in Bayesian GLMs is emphasized and related to stability issues in EP. In particular, we use our technique to infer the parameters of a point process model for neuronal spiking data from multiple electrodes, demonstrating significantly superior predictive performance when a sparsity assumption is enforced via a Laplace prior distribution.

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PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Implicit Surfaces with Globally Regularised and Compactly Supported Basis Functions

Walder, C., Schölkopf, B., Chapelle, O.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 19, pages: 273-280, (Editors: B Schölkopf and J Platt and T Hofmann), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 20th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), September 2007 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the problem of constructing a function whose zero set is to represent a surface, given sample points with surface normal vectors. The contributions include a novel means of regularising multi-scale compactly supported basis functions that leads to the desirable properties previously only associated with fully supported bases, and show equivalence to a Gaussian process with modified covariance function. We also provide a regularisation framework for simpler and more direct treatment of surface normals, along with a corresponding generalisation of the representer theorem. We demonstrate the techniques on 3D problems of up to 14 million data points, as well as 4D time series data.

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PDF Web [BibTex]