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2014


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Indirect Robot Model Learning for Tracking Control

Bocsi, B., Csató, L., Peters, J.

Advanced Robotics, 28(9):589-599, 2014 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

2014


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An extended approach for spatiotemporal gapfilling: dealing with large and systematic gaps in geoscientific datasets

v Buttlar, J., Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M.

Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics, 21(1):203-215, 2014 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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On the Quantification Accuracy, Homogeneity, and Stability of Simultaneous Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems

Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Bezrukov, I., Mantlik, F., Kolb, A., Kupferschläger, J., Pichler, B.

Investigative Radiology, 49(6):373-381, 2014 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Natural Evolution Strategies

Wierstra, D., Schaul, T., Glasmachers, T., Sun, Y., Peters, J., Schmidhuber, J.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 15, pages: 949-980, 2014 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Higher-Order Tensors in Diffusion Imaging

Schultz, T., Fuster, A., Ghosh, A., Deriche, R., Florack, L., Lim, L.

In Visualization and Processing of Tensors and Higher Order Descriptors for Multi-Valued Data, pages: 129-161, Mathematics + Visualization, (Editors: Westin, C.-F., Vilanova, A. and Burgeth, B.), Springer, 2014 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Factors controlling decomposition rates of fine root litter in temperate forests and grasslands

Solly, E., Schöning, I., Boch, S., Kandeler, E., Marhan, S., Michalzik, B., Müller, J., Zscheischler, J., Trumbore, S., Schrumpf, M.

Plant and Soil, 2014 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Causal Discovery with Continuous Additive Noise Models

Peters, J., Mooij, J., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 15, pages: 2009-2053, 2014 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Fuzzy Fibers: Uncertainty in dMRI Tractography

Schultz, T., Vilanova, A., Brecheisen, R., Kindlmann, G.

In Scientific Visualization: Uncertainty, Multifield, Biomedical, and Scalable Visualization, pages: 79-92, 8, Mathematics + Visualization, (Editors: Hansen, C. D., Chen, M., Johnson, C. R., Kaufman, A. E. and Hagen, H.), Springer, 2014 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A few extreme events dominate global interannual variability in gross primary production

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., v Buttlar, J., Harmeling, S., Jung, M., Rammig, A., Randerson, J., Schölkopf, B., Seneviratne, S., Tomelleri, E., Zaehle, S., Reichstein, M.

Environmental Research Letters, 9(3):035001, 2014 (article)

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel methods in system identification, machine learning and function estimation: A survey

Pillonetto, G., Dinuzzo, F., Chen, T., De Nicolao, G., Ljung, L.

Automatica, 50(3):657-682, 2014 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Development of a novel depth of interaction PET detector using highly multiplexed G-APD cross-strip encoding

Kolb, A., Parl, C., Mantlik, F., Liu, C., Lorenz, E., Renker, D., Pichler, B.

Medical Physics, 41(8), 2014 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Epidural electrocorticography for monitoring of arousal in locked-in state

Martens, S., Bensch, M., Halder, S., Hill, J., Nijboer, F., Ramos-Murguialday, A., Schölkopf, B., Birbaumer, N., Gharabaghi, A.

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(861), 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Nonconvex Proximal Splitting with Computational Errors

Sra, S.

In Regularization, Optimization, Kernels, and Support Vector Machines, pages: 83-102, 4, (Editors: Suykens, J. A. K., Signoretto, M. and Argyriou, A.), CRC Press, 2014 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Simultaneous Whole-Body PET/MR Imaging in Comparison to PET/CT in Pediatric Oncology: Initial Results

Schäfer, J. F., Gatidis, S., Schmidt, H., Gückel, B., Bezrukov, I., Pfannenberg, C. A., Reimold, M., M., E., Fuchs, J., Claussen, C. D., Schwenzer, N. F.

Radiology, 273(1):220-231, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Cost-Sensitive Active Learning With Lookahead: Optimizing Field Surveys for Remote Sensing Data Classification

Persello, C., Boularias, A., Dalponte, M., Gobakken, T., Naesset, E., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 10(52):6652 - 6664, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Principles of PET/MR Imaging

Disselhorst, J. A., Bezrukov, I., Kolb, A., Parl, C., Pichler, B. J.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 55(6, Supplement 2):2S-10S, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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IM3SHAPE: Maximum likelihood galaxy shear measurement code for cosmic gravitational lensing

Zuntz, J., Kacprzak, T., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M., Rowe, B., Bridle, S.

Astrophysics Source Code Library, 1, pages: 09013, 2014 (article)

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Active Learning - Modern Learning Theory

Balcan, M., Urner, R.

In Encyclopedia of Algorithms, (Editors: Kao, M.-Y.), Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2014 (incollection)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Efficient nearest neighbors via robust sparse hashing

Cherian, A., Sra, S., Morellas, V., Papanikolopoulos, N.

IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 23(8):3646-3655, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Domain adaptation-can quantity compensate for quality?

Ben-David, S., Urner, R.

Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, 70(3):185-202, 2014 (article)

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Sérsic galaxy models in weak lensing shape measurement: model bias, noise bias and their interaction

Kacprzak, T., Bridle, S., Rowe, B., Voigt, L., Zuntz, J., Hirsch, M., MacCrann, N.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 441(3):2528-2538, Oxford University Press, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Diminished White Matter Integrity in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

Schmidt-Wilcke, T., Cagnoli, P., Wang, P., Schultz, T., Lotz, A., Mccune, W. J., Sundgren, P. C.

NeuroImage: Clinical, 5, pages: 291-297, 2014 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Information-Theoretic Bounded Rationality and ϵ-Optimality

Braun, DA, Ortega, PA

Entropy, 16(8):4662-4676, August 2014 (article)

Abstract
Bounded rationality concerns the study of decision makers with limited information processing resources. Previously, the free energy difference functional has been suggested to model bounded rational decision making, as it provides a natural trade-off between an energy or utility function that is to be optimized and information processing costs that are measured by entropic search costs. The main question of this article is how the information-theoretic free energy model relates to simple \(\epsilon\)-optimality models of bounded rational decision making, where the decision maker is satisfied with any action in an \(\epsilon\)-neighborhood of the optimal utility. We find that the stochastic policies that optimize the free energy trade-off comply with the notion of \(\epsilon\)-optimality. Moreover, this optimality criterion even holds when the environment is adversarial. We conclude that the study of bounded rationality based on \(\epsilon\)-optimality criteria that abstract away from the particulars of the information processing constraints is compatible with the information-theoretic free energy model of bounded rationality.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Occam’s Razor in sensorimotor learning

Genewein, T, Braun, D

Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B, 281(1783):1-7, May 2014 (article)

Abstract
A large number of recent studies suggest that the sensorimotor system uses probabilistic models to predict its environment and makes inferences about unobserved variables in line with Bayesian statistics. One of the important features of Bayesian statistics is Occam's Razor—an inbuilt preference for simpler models when comparing competing models that explain some observed data equally well. Here, we test directly for Occam's Razor in sensorimotor control. We designed a sensorimotor task in which participants had to draw lines through clouds of noisy samples of an unobserved curve generated by one of two possible probabilistic models—a simple model with a large length scale, leading to smooth curves, and a complex model with a short length scale, leading to more wiggly curves. In training trials, participants were informed about the model that generated the stimulus so that they could learn the statistics of each model. In probe trials, participants were then exposed to ambiguous stimuli. In probe trials where the ambiguous stimulus could be fitted equally well by both models, we found that participants showed a clear preference for the simpler model. Moreover, we found that participants’ choice behaviour was quantitatively consistent with Bayesian Occam's Razor. We also show that participants’ drawn trajectories were similar to samples from the Bayesian predictive distribution over trajectories and significantly different from two non-probabilistic heuristics. In two control experiments, we show that the preference of the simpler model cannot be simply explained by a difference in physical effort or by a preference for curve smoothness. Our results suggest that Occam's Razor is a general behavioural principle already present during sensorimotor processing.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Generalized Thompson sampling for sequential decision-making and causal inference

Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

Complex Adaptive Systems Modeling, 2(2):1-23, March 2014 (article)

Abstract
Purpose Sampling an action according to the probability that the action is believed to be the optimal one is sometimes called Thompson sampling. Methods Although mostly applied to bandit problems, Thompson sampling can also be used to solve sequential adaptive control problems, when the optimal policy is known for each possible environment. The predictive distribution over actions can then be constructed by a Bayesian superposition of the policies weighted by their posterior probability of being optimal. Results Here we discuss two important features of this approach. First, we show in how far such generalized Thompson sampling can be regarded as an optimal strategy under limited information processing capabilities that constrain the sampling complexity of the decision-making process. Second, we show how such Thompson sampling can be extended to solve causal inference problems when interacting with an environment in a sequential fashion. Conclusion In summary, our results suggest that Thompson sampling might not merely be a useful heuristic, but a principled method to address problems of adaptive sequential decision-making and causal inference.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Assessing randomness and complexity in human motion trajectories through analysis of symbolic sequences

Peng, Z, Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 8(168):1-13, March 2014 (article)

Abstract
Complexity is a hallmark of intelligent behavior consisting both of regular patterns and random variation. To quantitatively assess the complexity and randomness of human motion, we designed a motor task in which we translated subjects' motion trajectories into strings of symbol sequences. In the first part of the experiment participants were asked to perform self-paced movements to create repetitive patterns, copy pre-specified letter sequences, and generate random movements. To investigate whether the degree of randomness can be manipulated, in the second part of the experiment participants were asked to perform unpredictable movements in the context of a pursuit game, where they received feedback from an online Bayesian predictor guessing their next move. We analyzed symbol sequences representing subjects' motion trajectories with five common complexity measures: predictability, compressibility, approximate entropy, Lempel-Ziv complexity, as well as effective measure complexity. We found that subjects’ self-created patterns were the most complex, followed by drawing movements of letters and self-paced random motion. We also found that participants could change the randomness of their behavior depending on context and feedback. Our results suggest that humans can adjust both complexity and regularity in different movement types and contexts and that this can be assessed with information-theoretic measures of the symbolic sequences generated from movement trajectories.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2001


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Anabolic and Catabolic Gene Expression Pattern Analysis in Normal Versus Osteoarthritic Cartilage Using Complementary DNA-Array Technology

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Gehrsitz, A., Gebhard, P., McKenna, L.

Arthritis and Rheumatism, 44(12):2777-2789, December 2001 (article)

Web [BibTex]

2001

Web [BibTex]


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Generalization performance of regularization networks and support vector machines via entropy numbers of compact operators

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 47(6):2516-2532, September 2001 (article)

Abstract
We derive new bounds for the generalization error of kernel machines, such as support vector machines and related regularization networks by obtaining new bounds on their covering numbers. The proofs make use of a viewpoint that is apparently novel in the field of statistical learning theory. The hypothesis class is described in terms of a linear operator mapping from a possibly infinite-dimensional unit ball in feature space into a finite-dimensional space. The covering numbers of the class are then determined via the entropy numbers of the operator. These numbers, which characterize the degree of compactness of the operator can be bounded in terms of the eigenvalues of an integral operator induced by the kernel function used by the machine. As a consequence, we are able to theoretically explain the effect of the choice of kernel function on the generalization performance of support vector machines.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Centralization: A new method for the normalization of gene expression data

Zien, A., Aigner, T., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 17, pages: S323-S331, June 2001, Mathematical supplement available at http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/574280.html (article)

Abstract
Microarrays measure values that are approximately proportional to the numbers of copies of different mRNA molecules in samples. Due to technical difficulties, the constant of proportionality between the measured intensities and the numbers of mRNA copies per cell is unknown and may vary for different arrays. Usually, the data are normalized (i.e., array-wise multiplied by appropriate factors) in order to compensate for this effect and to enable informative comparisons between different experiments. Centralization is a new two-step method for the computation of such normalization factors that is both biologically better motivated and more robust than standard approaches. First, for each pair of arrays the quotient of the constants of proportionality is estimated. Second, from the resulting matrix of pairwise quotients an optimally consistent scaling of the samples is computed.

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Regularized principal manifolds

Smola, A., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 1, pages: 179-209, June 2001 (article)

Abstract
Many settings of unsupervised learning can be viewed as quantization problems - the minimization of the expected quantization error subject to some restrictions. This allows the use of tools such as regularization from the theory of (supervised) risk minimization for unsupervised learning. This setting turns out to be closely related to principal curves, the generative topographic map, and robust coding. We explore this connection in two ways: (1) we propose an algorithm for finding principal manifolds that can be regularized in a variety of ways; and (2) we derive uniform convergence bounds and hence bounds on the learning rates of the algorithm. In particular, we give bounds on the covering numbers which allows us to obtain nearly optimal learning rates for certain types of regularization operators. Experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the approach.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Failure Diagnosis of Discrete Event Systems

Son, HI., Kim, KW., Lee, S.

Journal of Control, Automation and Systems Engineering, 7(5):375-383, May 2001, In Korean (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Pattern Selection Using the Bias and Variance of Ensemble

Shin, H., Cho, S.

Journal of the Korean Institute of Industrial Engineers, 28(1):112-127, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
[Abstract]: A useful pattern is a pattern that contributes much to learning. For a classification problem those patterns near the class boundary surfaces carry more information to the classifier. For a regression problem the ones near the estimated surface carry more information. In both cases, the usefulness is defined only for those patterns either without error or with negligible error. Using only the useful patterns gives several benefits. First, computational complexity in memory and time for learning is decreased. Second, overfitting is avoided even when the learner is over-sized. Third, learning results in more stable learners. In this paper, we propose a pattern “utility index” that measures the utility of an individual pattern. The utility index is based on the bias and variance of a pattern trained by a network ensemble. In classification, the pattern with a low bias and a high variance gets a high score. In regression, on the other hand, the one with a low bias and a low variance gets a high score. Based on the distribution of the utility index, the original training set is divided into a high-score group and a low-score group. Only the high-score group is then used for training. The proposed method is tested on synthetic and real-world benchmark datasets. The proposed approach gives a better or at least similar performance.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Structure and Functionality of a Designed p53 Dimer.

Davison, TS., Nie, X., Ma, W., Lin, Y., Kay, C., Benchimol, S., Arrowsmith, C.

Journal of Molecular Biology, 307(2):605-617, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
P53 is a homotetrameric tumor suppressor protein involved in transcriptional control of genes that regulate cell proliferation and death. In order to probe the role that oligomerization plays in this capacity, we have previously designed and characterized a series of p53 proteins with altered oligomeric states through hydrophilc substitution of residues Met340 or Leu344 in the normally tetrameric oligomerization domain. Although such mutations have little effect on the overall secondary structural content of the oligomerization domain, both solubility and the resistance to thermal denaturation are substantially reduced relative to that of the wild-type domain. Here, we report the design and characterization of a double-mutant p53 with alterations of residues at positions Met340 and Leu344. The double-mutations Met340Glu/Leu344Lys and Met340Gln/Leu344Arg resulted in distinct dimeric forms of the protein. Furthermore, we have verified by NMR structure determination that the double-mutant Met340Gln/Leu344Arg is essentially a "half-tetramer". Analysis of the in vivo activities of full-length p53 oligomeric mutants reveals that while cell-cycle arrest requires tetrameric p53, transcriptional transactivation activity of monomers and dimers retain roughly background and half of the wild-type activity, respectively.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 12(2):181-201, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
This paper provides an introduction to support vector machines, kernel Fisher discriminant analysis, and kernel principal component analysis, as examples for successful kernel-based learning methods. We first give a short background about Vapnik-Chervonenkis theory and kernel feature spaces and then proceed to kernel based learning in supervised and unsupervised scenarios including practical and algorithmic considerations. We illustrate the usefulness of kernel algorithms by discussing applications such as optical character recognition and DNA analysis

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution.

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

Neural Computation, 13(7):1443-1471, March 2001 (article)

Abstract
Suppose you are given some data set drawn from an underlying probability distribution P and you want to estimate a “simple” subset S of input space such that the probability that a test point drawn from P lies outside of S equals some a priori specified value between 0 and 1. We propose a method to approach this problem by trying to estimate a function f that is positive on S and negative on the complement. The functional form of f is given by a kernel expansion in terms of a potentially small subset of the training data; it is regularized by controlling the length of the weight vector in an associated feature space. The expansion coefficients are found by solving a quadratic programming problem, which we do by carrying out sequential optimization over pairs of input patterns. We also provide a theoretical analysis of the statistical performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is a natural extension of the support vector algorithm to the case of unlabeled data.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: II. Bootstrap-based confidence intervals and sampling

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1314-1329, 2001 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Extracting egomotion from optic flow: limits of accuracy and neural matched filters

Dahmen, H-J., Franz, MO., Krapp, HG.

In pages: 143-168, Springer, Berlin, 2001 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The control structure of artificial creatures

Zhou, D., Dai, R.

Artificial Life and Robotics, 5(3), 2001, invited article (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]