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2006


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The Pedestal Effect is Caused by Off-Frequency Looking, not Nonlinear Transduction or Contrast Gain-Control

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

9, pages: 174, 9th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), March 2006 (poster)

Abstract
The pedestal or dipper effect is the large improvement in the detectability of a sinusoidal grating observed when the signal is added to a pedestal or masking grating having the signal‘s spatial frequency, orientation, and phase. The effect is largest with pedestal contrasts just above the ‘threshold’ in the absence of a pedestal. We measured the pedestal effect in both broadband and notched masking noise---noise from which a 1.5-octave band centered on the signal and pedestal frequency had been removed. The pedestal effect persists in broadband noise, but almost disappears with notched noise. The spatial-frequency components of the notched noise that lie above and below the spatial frequency of the signal and pedestal prevent the use of information about changes in contrast carried in channels tuned to spatial frequencies that are very much different from that of the signal and pedestal. We conclude that the pedestal effect in the absence of notched noise results principally from the use of information derived from channels with peak sensitivities at spatial frequencies that are different from that of the signal and pedestal. Thus the pedestal or dipper effect is not a characteristic of individual spatial-frequency tuned channels.

Web [BibTex]

2006

Web [BibTex]


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Efficient tests for the deconvolution hypothesis

Langovoy, M.

Workshop on Statistical Inverse Problems, March 2006 (poster)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Kernel extrapolation

Vishwanathan, SVN., Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Smola, AJ.

Neurocomputing, 69(7-9):721-729, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present a framework for efficient extrapolation of reduced rank approximations, graph kernels, and locally linear embeddings (LLE) to unseen data. We also present a principled method to combine many of these kernels and then extrapolate them. Central to our method is a theorem for matrix approximation, and an extension of the representer theorem to handle multiple joint regularization constraints. Experiments in protein classification demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Properties of Kernel Principal Component Analysis

Blanchard, G., Bousquet, O., Zwald, L.

Machine Learning, 66(2-3):259-294, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We study the properties of the eigenvalues of Gram matrices in a non-asymptotic setting. Using local Rademacher averages, we provide data-dependent and tight bounds for their convergence towards eigenvalues of the corresponding kernel operator. We perform these computations in a functional analytic framework which allows to deal implicitly with reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of infinite dimension. This can have applications to various kernel algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM). We focus on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and, using such techniques, we obtain sharp excess risk bounds for the reconstruction error. In these bounds, the dependence on the decay of the spectrum and on the closeness of successive eigenvalues is made explicit.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Network-based de-noising improves prediction from microarray data

Kato, T., Murata, Y., Miura, K., Asai, K., Horton, P., Tsuda, K., Fujibuchi, W.

BMC Bioinformatics, 7(Suppl. 1):S4-S4, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
Prediction of human cell response to anti-cancer drugs (compounds) from microarray data is a challenging problem, due to the noise properties of microarrays as well as the high variance of living cell responses to drugs. Hence there is a strong need for more practical and robust methods than standard methods for real-value prediction. We devised an extended version of the off-subspace noise-reduction (de-noising) method to incorporate heterogeneous network data such as sequence similarity or protein-protein interactions into a single framework. Using that method, we first de-noise the gene expression data for training and test data and also the drug-response data for training data. Then we predict the unknown responses of each drug from the de-noised input data. For ascertaining whether de-noising improves prediction or not, we carry out 12-fold cross-validation for assessment of the prediction performance. We use the Pearson‘s correlation coefficient between the true and predicted respon se values as the prediction performance. De-noising improves the prediction performance for 65% of drugs. Furthermore, we found that this noise reduction method is robust and effective even when a large amount of artificial noise is added to the input data. We found that our extended off-subspace noise-reduction method combining heterogeneous biological data is successful and quite useful to improve prediction of human cell cancer drug responses from microarray data.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of Natural Scenes: Critical Features Revisited

Drewes, J., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

9, pages: 92, 9th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), March 2006 (poster)

Abstract
Human observers are capable of detecting animals within novel natural scenes with remarkable speed and accuracy. Despite the seeming complexity of such decisions it has been hypothesized that a simple global image feature, the relative abundance of high spatial frequencies at certain orientations, could underly such fast image classification [1]. We successfully used linear discriminant analysis to classify a set of 11.000 images into “animal” and “non-animal” images based on their individual amplitude spectra only [2]. We proceeded to sort the images based on the performance of our classifier, retaining only the best and worst classified 400 images ("best animals", "best distractors" and "worst animals", "worst distractors"). We used a Go/No-go paradigm to evaluate human performance on this subset of our images. Both reaction time and proportion of correctly classified images showed a significant effect of classification difficulty. Images more easily classified by our algorithm were also classified faster and better by humans, as predicted by the Torralba & Oliva hypothesis. We then equated the amplitude spectra of the 400 images, which, by design, reduced algorithmic performance to chance whereas human performance was only slightly reduced [3]. Most importantly, the same images as before were still classified better and faster, suggesting that even in the original condition features other than specifics of the amplitude spectrum made particular images easy to classify, clearly at odds with the Torralba & Oliva hypothesis.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Factorial Coding of Natural Images: How Effective are Linear Models in Removing Higher-Order Dependencies?

Bethge, M.

9, pages: 90, 9th T{\"u}bingen Perception Conference (TWK), March 2006 (poster)

Abstract
The performance of unsupervised learning models for natural images is evaluated quantitatively by means of information theory. We estimate the gain in statistical independence (the multi-information reduction) achieved with independent component analysis (ICA), principal component analysis (PCA), zero-phase whitening, and predictive coding. Predictive coding is translated into the transform coding framework, where it can be characterized by the constraint of a triangular filter matrix. A randomly sampled whitening basis and the Haar wavelet are included into the comparison as well. The comparison of all these methods is carried out for different patch sizes, ranging from 2x2 to 16x16 pixels. In spite of large differences in the shape of the basis functions, we find only small differences in the multi-information between all decorrelation transforms (5% or less) for all patch sizes. Among the second-order methods, PCA is optimal for small patch sizes and predictive coding performs best for large patch sizes. The extra gain achieved with ICA is always less than 2%. In conclusion, the `edge filters‘ found with ICA lead only to a surprisingly small improvement in terms of its actual objective.

Web [BibTex]


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Data mining problems and solutions for response modeling in CRM

Cho, S., Shin, H., Yu, E., Ha, K., MacLachlan, D.

Entrue Journal of Information Technology, 5(1):55-64, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present three data mining problems that are often encountered in building a response model. They are robust modeling, variable selection and data selection. Respective algorithmic solutions are given. They are bagging based ensemble, genetic algorithm based wrapper approach and nearest neighbor-based data selection in that order. A real world data set from Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, or DMEF4, is used to show their effectiveness. Proposed methods were found to solve the problems in a practical way.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Model-based Design Analysis and Yield Optimization

Pfingsten, T., Herrmann, D., Rasmussen, C.

IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, 19(4):475-486, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Fluctuations are inherent to any fabrication process. Integrated circuits and micro-electro-mechanical systems are particularly affected by these variations, and due to high quality requirements the effect on the devices’ performance has to be understood quantitatively. In recent years it has become possible to model the performance of such complex systems on the basis of design specifications, and model-based Sensitivity Analysis has made its way into industrial engineering. We show how an efficient Bayesian approach, using a Gaussian process prior, can replace the commonly used brute-force Monte Carlo scheme, making it possible to apply the analysis to computationally costly models. We introduce a number of global, statistically justified sensitivity measures for design analysis and optimization. Two models of integrated systems serve us as case studies to introduce the analysis and to assess its convergence properties. We show that the Bayesian Monte Carlo scheme can save costly simulation runs and can ensure a reliable accuracy of the analysis.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Weighting of experimental evidence in macromolecular structure determination

Habeck, M., Rieping, W., Nilges, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(6):1756-1761, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
The determination of macromolecular structures requires weighting of experimental evidence relative to prior physical information. Although it can critically affect the quality of the calculated structures, experimental data are routinely weighted on an empirical basis. At present, cross-validation is the most rigorous method to determine the best weight. We describe a general method to adaptively weight experimental data in the course of structure calculation. It is further shown that the necessity to define weights for the data can be completely alleviated. We demonstrate the method on a structure calculation from NMR data and find that the resulting structures are optimal in terms of accuracy and structural quality. Our method is devoid of the bias imposed by an empirical choice of the weight and has some advantages over estimating the weight by cross-validation.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Prenatal development of ocular dominance and orientation maps in a self-organizing model of V1

Jegelka, S., Bednar, J., Miikkulainen, R.

Neurocomputing, 69(10-12):1291-1296, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
How orientation and ocular-dominance (OD) maps develop before visual experience begins is controversial. Possible influences include molecular signals and spontaneous activity, but their contributions remain unclear. This paper presents LISSOM simulations suggesting that previsual spontaneous activity alone is sufficient for realistic OR and OD maps to develop. Individual maps develop robustly with various previsual patterns, and are aided by background noise. However, joint OR/OD maps depend crucially on how correlated the patterns are between eyes, even over brief initial periods. Therefore, future biological experiments should account for multiple activity sources, and should measure map interactions rather than maps of single features.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Subspace identification through blind source separation

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(2):100-103, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Given a linear and instantaneous mixture model, we prove that for blind source separation (BSS) algorithms based on mutual information, only sources with non-Gaussian distribution are consistently reconstructed independent of initial conditions. This allows the identification of non-Gaussian sources and consequently the identification of signal and noise subspaces through BSS. The results are illustrated with a simple example, and the implications for a variety of signal processing applications, such as denoising and model identification, are discussed.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of Faces in Man and Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(1):143-165, January 2006 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction as a Deflation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(1):45-48, 2006 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Classification of natural scenes: critical features revisited

Drewes, J., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Experimentelle Psychologie: Beitr{\"a}ge zur 48. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 48, pages: 251, 2006 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Apparatus for Inspecting Alignment Film of Liquid Crystal Display and Method Thereof

Park, MW., Son, HI., Kim, SJ., Kim, KI., Yang, JW.

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Biologische Kybernetik, 2006 (patent)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Texture and haptic cues in slant discrimination: combination is sensitive to reliability but not statistically optimal

Rosas, P., Wagemans, J., Ernst, M., Wichmann, F.

Beitr{\"a}ge zur 48. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen (TeaP 2006), 48, pages: 80, 2006 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Symbol Recognition with Kernel Density Matching

Zhang, W., Wenyin, L., Zhang, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 28(12):2020-2024, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to similarity assessment for graphic symbols. Symbols are represented as 2D kernel densities and their similarity is measured by the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Symbol orientation is found by gradient-based angle searching or independent component analysis. Experimental results show the outstanding performance of this approach in various situations.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An adaptive method for subband decomposition ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Neural Computation, 18(1):191-223, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Subband decomposition ICA (SDICA), an extension of ICA, assumes that each source is represented as the sum of some independent subcomponents and dependent subcomponents, which have different frequency bands. In this article, we first investigate the feasibility of separating the SDICA mixture in an adaptive manner. Second, we develop an adaptive method for SDICA, namely band-selective ICA (BS-ICA), which finds the mixing matrix and the estimate of the source independent subcomponents. This method is based on the minimization of the mutual information between outputs. Some practical issues are discussed. For better applicability, a scheme to avoid the high-dimensional score function difference is given. Third, we investigate one form of the overcomplete ICA problems with sources having specific frequency characteristics, which BS-ICA can also be used to solve. Experimental results illustrate the success of the proposed method for solving both SDICA and the over-complete ICA problems.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Ähnlichkeitsmasse in Modellen zur Kategorienbildung

Jäkel, F., Wichmann, F.

Experimentelle Psychologie: Beitr{\"a}ge zur 48. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 48, pages: 223, 2006 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The pedestal effect is caused by off-frequency looking, not nonlinear transduction or contrast gain-control

Wichmann, F., Henning, B.

Experimentelle Psychologie: Beitr{\"a}ge zur 48. Tagung experimentell arbeitender Psychologen, 48, pages: 205, 2006 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Apparatus for Inspecting Flat Panel Display and Method Thereof

Yang, JW., Kim, KI., Son, HI.

Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Biologische Kybernetik, 2006 (patent)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

2002


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Real-Time Statistical Learning for Oculomotor Control and Visuomotor Coordination

Vijayakumar, S., Souza, A., Peters, J., Conradt, J., Rutkowski, T., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Inoue, M., Shibata, T., Wiryo, A., Itti, L., Amari, S., Schaal, S.

(Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), December 2002 (poster)

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Phase information in the recognition of natural images

Braun, D., Wichmann, F., Gegenfurtner, K.

Perception, 31(ECVP Abstract Supplement):133, 25th European Conference on Visual Perception, August 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Fourier phase plays an important role in determining global image structure. For example, when the phase spectrum of an image of a flower is swapped with that of a tank, we usually perceive a tank, even though the amplitude spectrum is still that of the flower. Similarly, when the phase spectrum of an image is randomly swapped across frequencies, that is its Fourier energy is randomly distributed over the image, the resulting image becomes impossible to recognise. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of phase manipulations in a quantitative manner. Subjects viewed two images of natural scenes, one of which contained an animal (the target) embedded in the background. The spectra of the images were manipulated by adding random phase noise at each frequency. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly distributed between 0° and ±180°. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120° noise, subjects were still 75% correct. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and noise-distorted images. Thus it appears as if it was not the global phase information per se that determines our percept of natural images, but rather the effect of phase on local image features.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Co-Clustering of Biological Networks and Gene Expression Data

Hanisch, D., Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, (Suppl 1):145S-154S, 18, July 2002 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Large scale gene expression data are often analysed by clustering genes based on gene expression data alone, though a priori knowledge in the form of biological networks is available. The use of this additional information promises to improve exploratory analysis considerably. Results: We propose constructing a distance function which combines information from expression data and biological networks. Based on this function, we compute a joint clustering of genes and vertices of the network. This general approach is elaborated for metabolic networks. We define a graph distance function on such networks and combine it with a correlation-based distance function for gene expression measurements. A hierarchical clustering and an associated statistical measure is computed to arrive at a reasonable number of clusters. Our method is validated using expression data of the yeast diauxic shift. The resulting clusters are easily interpretable in terms of the biochemical network and the gene expression data and suggest that our method is able to automatically identify processes that are relevant under the measured conditions.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Confidence measures for protein fold recognition

Sommer, I., Zien, A., von Ohsen, N., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 18(6):802-812, June 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The contributions of color to recognition memory for natural scenes

Wichmann, F., Sharpe, L., Gegenfurtner, K.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 28(3):509-520, May 2002 (article)

Abstract
The authors used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the influence of color information on visual memory for images of natural scenes. Subjects performed 5-10% better for colored than for black-and-white images independent of exposure duration. Experiment 2 indicated little influence of contrast once the images were suprathreshold, and Experiment 3 revealed that performance worsened when images were presented in color and tested in black and white, or vice versa, leading to the conclusion that the surface property color is part of the memory representation. Experiments 4 and 5 exclude the possibility that the superior recognition memory for colored images results solely from attentional factors or saliency. Finally, the recognition memory advantage disappears for falsely colored images of natural scenes: The improvement in recognition memory depends on the color congruence of presented images with learned knowledge about the color gamut found within natural scenes. The results can be accounted for within a multiple memory systems framework.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Detection and discrimination in pink noise

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

5, pages: 100, 5. T{\"u}binger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK), February 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about early spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli, which are not, perhaps, particularly "natural" stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast whilst keeping the number of unknown parameters comparatively small. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on our display was measured using a high-performance digital camera (Photometrics) and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband 1-D "pink" noise made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Training invariant support vector machines

DeCoste, D., Schölkopf, B.

Machine Learning, 46(1-3):161-190, January 2002 (article)

Abstract
Practical experience has shown that in order to obtain the best possible performance, prior knowledge about invariances of a classification problem at hand ought to be incorporated into the training procedure. We describe and review all known methods for doing so in support vector machines, provide experimental results, and discuss their respective merits. One of the significant new results reported in this work is our recent achievement of the lowest reported test error on the well-known MNIST digit recognition benchmark task, with SVM training times that are also significantly faster than previous SVM methods.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency

Bird, C., Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1267-1273, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The detectability of contrast increments was measured as a function of the contrast of a masking or “pedestal” grating at a number of different spatial frequencies ranging from 2 to 16 cycles per degree of visual angle. The pedestal grating always had the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase as the signal. The shape of the contrast increment threshold versus pedestal contrast (TvC) functions depend of the performance level used to define the “threshold,” but when both axes are normalized by the contrast corresponding to 75% correct detection at each frequency, the (TvC) functions at a given performance level are identical. Confidence intervals on the slope of the rising part of the TvC functions are so wide that it is not possible with our data to reject Weber’s Law.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Model Selection for Small Sample Regression

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bengio, Y.

Machine Learning, 48(1-3):9-23, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Model selection is an important ingredient of many machine learning algorithms, in particular when the sample size in small, in order to strike the right trade-off between overfitting and underfitting. Previous classical results for linear regression are based on an asymptotic analysis. We present a new penalization method for performing model selection for regression that is appropriate even for small samples. Our penalization is based on an accurate estimator of the ratio of the expected training error and the expected generalization error, in terms of the expected eigenvalues of the input covariance matrix.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Application of Monte Carlo Methods to Psychometric Function Fitting

Wichmann, F.

Proceedings of the 33rd European Conference on Mathematical Psychology, pages: 44, 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer's performance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. Here I describe methods to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing goodness-of-fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function's parameters and other estimates derived from them. First I describe a constrained maximum-likelihood method for parameter estimation. Using Monte-Carlo simulations I demonstrate that it is important to have a fitting method that takes stimulus-independent errors (or "lapses") into account. Second, a number of goodness-of-fit tests are introduced. Because psychophysical data sets are usually rather small I advocate the use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory for goodness-of-fit assessment. Third, a parametric bootstrap is employed to estimate the variability of fitted parameters and derived quantities such as thresholds and slopes. I describe how the bootstrap bridging assumption, on which the validity of the procedure depends, can be tested without incurring too high a cost in computation time. Finally I describe how the methods can be extended to test hypotheses concerning the form and shape of several psychometric functions. Software describing the methods is available (http://www.bootstrap-software.com/psignifit/), as well as articles describing the methods in detail (Wichmann&Hill, Perception&Psychophysics, 2001a,b).

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Bennett Concentration Inequality and Its Application to Suprema of Empirical Processes

Bousquet, O.

C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris, Ser. I, 334, pages: 495-500, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We introduce new concentration inequalities for functions on product spaces. They allow to obtain a Bennett type deviation bound for suprema of empirical processes indexed by upper bounded functions. The result is an improvement on Rio's version \cite{Rio01b} of Talagrand's inequality \cite{Talagrand96} for equidistributed variables.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Numerical evolution of axisymmetric, isolated systems in general relativity

Frauendiener, J., Hein, M.

Physical Review D, 66, pages: 124004-124004, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We describe in this article a new code for evolving axisymmetric isolated systems in general relativity. Such systems are described by asymptotically flat space-times, which have the property that they admit a conformal extension. We are working directly in the extended conformal manifold and solve numerically Friedrich's conformal field equations, which state that Einstein's equations hold in the physical space-time. Because of the compactness of the conformal space-time the entire space-time can be calculated on a finite numerical grid. We describe in detail the numerical scheme, especially the treatment of the axisymmetry and the boundary.

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for biological sequences

Tsuda, K., Kin, T., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 1):268-275, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Stability and Generalization

Bousquet, O., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 2, pages: 499-526, 2002 (article)

Abstract
We define notions of stability for learning algorithms and show how to use these notions to derive generalization error bounds based on the empirical error and the leave-one-out error. The methods we use can be applied in the regression framework as well as in the classification one when the classifier is obtained by thresholding a real-valued function. We study the stability properties of large classes of learning algorithms such as regularization based algorithms. In particular we focus on Hilbert space regularization and Kullback-Leibler regularization. We demonstrate how to apply the results to SVM for regression and classification.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Subspace information criterion for non-quadratic regularizers – model selection for sparse regressors

Tsuda, K., Sugiyama, M., Müller, K.

IEEE Trans Neural Networks, 13(1):70-80, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Modeling splicing sites with pairwise correlations

Arita, M., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 2):27-34, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with pulse-trains in pink noise

Henning, G., Bird, C., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1259-1266, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Detection performance was measured with sinusoidal and pulse-train gratings. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train, or line gratings, contained at least 8 harmonics all at equal contrast, they were no more detectable than their most detectable component. The addition of broadband pink noise designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train made the pulse train about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with a pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not affect the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that obtained with its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Optimal linear estimation of self-motion - a real-world test of a model of fly tangential neurons

Franz, MO.

SAB 02 Workshop, Robotics as theoretical biology, 7th meeting of the International Society for Simulation of Adaptive Behaviour (SAB), (Editors: Prescott, T.; Webb, B.), 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion (see example in Fig.1). We examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor that can be moved along three translational and one rotational degree of freedom. The experiments indicate that the proposed approach yields accurate results for rotation estimates, independently of the current translation and scene layout. Translation estimates, however, turned out to be sensitive to simultaneous rotation and to the particular distance distribution of the scene. The gantry experiments confirm that the receptive field organization of the tangential neurons allows them, as an ensemble, to extract self-motion from the optic flow.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]