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2002


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Modeling splicing sites with pairwise correlations

Arita, M., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

Bioinformatics, 18(Suppl 2):27-34, 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

2002

PDF [BibTex]


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Observations on the Nyström Method for Gaussian Process Prediction

Williams, C., Rasmussen, C., Schwaighofer, A., Tresp, V.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2002 (techreport)

Abstract
A number of methods for speeding up Gaussian Process (GP) prediction have been proposed, including the Nystr{\"o}m method of Williams and Seeger (2001). In this paper we focus on two issues (1) the relationship of the Nystr{\"o}m method to the Subset of Regressors method (Poggio and Girosi 1990; Luo and Wahba, 1997) and (2) understanding in what circumstances the Nystr{\"o}m approximation would be expected to provide a good approximation to exact GP regression.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Perfusion Quantification using Gaussian Process Deconvolution

Andersen, IK., Szymkowiak, A., Rasmussen, CE., Hanson, LG., Marstrand, JR., Larsson, HBW., Hansen, LK.

Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, (48):351-361, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The quantification of perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MR imaging requires deconvolution to obtain the residual impulse-response function (IRF). Here, a method using a Gaussian process for deconvolution, GPD, is proposed. The fact that the IRF is smooth is incorporated as a constraint in the method. The GPD method, which automatically estimates the noise level in each voxel, has the advantage that model parameters are optimized automatically. The GPD is compared to singular value decomposition (SVD) using a common threshold for the singular values and to SVD using a threshold optimized according to the noise level in each voxel. The comparison is carried out using artificial data as well as using data from healthy volunteers. It is shown that GPD is comparable to SVD variable optimized threshold when determining the maximum of the IRF, which is directly related to the perfusion. GPD provides a better estimate of the entire IRF. As the signal to noise ratio increases or the time resolution of the measurements increases, GPD is shown to be superior to SVD. This is also found for large distribution volumes.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Tracking a Small Set of Experts by Mixing Past Posteriors

Bousquet, O., Warmuth, M.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 3, pages: 363-396, (Editors: Long, P.), 2002 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we examine on-line learning problems in which the target concept is allowed to change over time. In each trial a master algorithm receives predictions from a large set of n experts. Its goal is to predict almost as well as the best sequence of such experts chosen off-line by partitioning the training sequence into k+1 sections and then choosing the best expert for each section. We build on methods developed by Herbster and Warmuth and consider an open problem posed by Freund where the experts in the best partition are from a small pool of size m. Since k >> m, the best expert shifts back and forth between the experts of the small pool. We propose algorithms that solve this open problem by mixing the past posteriors maintained by the master algorithm. We relate the number of bits needed for encoding the best partition to the loss bounds of the algorithms. Instead of paying log n for choosing the best expert in each section we first pay log (n choose m) bits in the bounds for identifying the pool of m experts and then log m bits per new section. In the bounds we also pay twice for encoding the boundaries of the sections.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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A femoral arteriovenous shunt facilitates arterial whole blood sampling in animals

Weber, B., Burger, C., Biro, P., Buck, A.

Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging, 29, pages: 319-323, 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Some Local Measures of Complexity of Convex Hulls and Generalization Bounds

Bousquet, O., Koltchinskii, V., Panchenko, D.

In Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, Proceedings of the 15th annual conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate measures of complexity of function classes based on continuity moduli of Gaussian and Rademacher processes. For Gaussian processes, we obtain bounds on the continuity modulus on the convex hull of a function class in terms of the same quantity for the class itself. We also obtain new bounds on generalization error in terms of localized Rademacher complexities. This allows us to prove new results about generalization performance for convex hulls in terms of characteristics of the base class. As a byproduct, we obtain a simple proof of some of the known bounds on the entropy of convex hulls.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Contrast discrimination with pulse-trains in pink noise

Henning, G., Bird, C., Wichmann, F.

Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19(7), pages: 1259-1266, 2002 (article)

Abstract
Detection performance was measured with sinusoidal and pulse-train gratings. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train, or line gratings, contained at least 8 harmonics all at equal contrast, they were no more detectable than their most detectable component. The addition of broadband pink noise designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train made the pulse train about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with a pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not affect the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that obtained with its sinusoidal components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A kernel approach for learning from almost orthogonal patterns

Schölkopf, B., Weston, J., Eskin, E., Leslie, C., Noble, W.

In Principles of Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2430/2431, pages: 511-528, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, (Editors: T Elomaa and H Mannila and H Toivonen), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 13th European Conference on Machine Learning (ECML) and 6th European Conference on Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases (PKDD'2002), 2002 (inproceedings)

PostScript DOI [BibTex]

PostScript DOI [BibTex]


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Optimal linear estimation of self-motion - a real-world test of a model of fly tangential neurons

Franz, MO.

SAB 02 Workshop, Robotics as theoretical biology, 7th meeting of the International Society for Simulation of Adaptive Behaviour (SAB), (Editors: Prescott, T.; Webb, B.), 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion (see example in Fig.1). We examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge both about the distance distribution of the environment, and about the noise and self-motion statistics of the sensor. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor that can be moved along three translational and one rotational degree of freedom. The experiments indicate that the proposed approach yields accurate results for rotation estimates, independently of the current translation and scene layout. Translation estimates, however, turned out to be sensitive to simultaneous rotation and to the particular distance distribution of the scene. The gantry experiments confirm that the receptive field organization of the tangential neurons allows them, as an ensemble, to extract self-motion from the optic flow.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Choosing Multiple Parameters for Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Vapnik, V., Bousquet, O., Mukherjee, S.

Machine Learning, 46(1):131-159, 2002 (article)

Abstract
The problem of automatically tuning multiple parameters for pattern recognition Support Vector Machines (SVM) is considered. This is done by minimizing some estimates of the generalization error of SVMs using a gradient descent algorithm over the set of parameters. Usual methods for choosing parameters, based on exhaustive search become intractable as soon as the number of parameters exceeds two. Some experimental results assess the feasibility of our approach for a large number of parameters (more than 100) and demonstrate an improvement of generalization performance.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Infinite Mixtures of Gaussian Process Experts

Rasmussen, CE., Ghahramani, Z.

In (Editors: Dietterich, Thomas G.; Becker, Suzanna; Ghahramani, Zoubin), 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present an extension to the Mixture of Experts (ME) model, where the individual experts are Gaussian Process (GP) regression models. Using a input-dependent adaptation of the Dirichlet Process, we implement a gating network for an infinite number of Experts. Inference in this model may be done efficiently using a Markov Chain relying on Gibbs sampling. The model allows the effective covariance function to vary with the inputs, and may handle large datasets -- thus potentially overcoming two of the biggest hurdles with GP models. Simulations show the viability of this approach.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Marginalized kernels for RNA sequence data analysis

Kin, T., Tsuda, K., Asai, K.

In Genome Informatics 2002, pages: 112-122, (Editors: Lathtop, R. H.; Nakai, K.; Miyano, S.; Takagi, T.; Kanehisa, M.), Genome Informatics, 2002, (Best Paper Award) (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Luminance Artifacts on CRT Displays

Wichmann, F.

In IEEE Visualization, pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R.; Gross, M.; Joy, K. I.), IEEE Visualization, 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Most visualization panels today are still built around cathode-ray tubes (CRTs), certainly on personal desktops at work and at home. Whilst capable of producing pleasing images for common applications ranging from email writing to TV and DVD presentation, it is as well to note that there are a number of nonlinear transformations between input (voltage) and output (luminance) which distort the digital and/or analogue images send to a CRT. Some of them are input-independent and hence easy to fix, e.g. gamma correction, but others, such as pixel interactions, depend on the content of the input stimulus and are thus harder to compensate for. CRT-induced image distortions cause problems not only in basic vision research but also for applications where image fidelity is critical, most notably in medicine (digitization of X-ray images for diagnostic purposes) and in forms of online commerce, such as the online sale of images, where the image must be reproduced on some output device which will not have the same transfer function as the customer's CRT. I will present measurements from a number of CRTs and illustrate how some of their shortcomings may be problematic for the aforementioned applications.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1997


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Comparing support vector machines with Gaussian kernels to radial basis function classifiers

Schölkopf, B., Sung, K., Burges, C., Girosi, F., Niyogi, P., Poggio, T., Vapnik, V.

IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 45(11):2758-2765, November 1997 (article)

Abstract
The support vector (SV) machine is a novel type of learning machine, based on statistical learning theory, which contains polynomial classifiers, neural networks, and radial basis function (RBF) networks as special cases. In the RBF case, the SV algorithm automatically determines centers, weights, and threshold that minimize an upper bound on the expected test error. The present study is devoted to an experimental comparison of these machines with a classical approach, where the centers are determined by X-means clustering, and the weights are computed using error backpropagation. We consider three machines, namely, a classical RBF machine, an SV machine with Gaussian kernel, and a hybrid system with the centers determined by the SV method and the weights trained by error backpropagation. Our results show that on the United States postal service database of handwritten digits, the SV machine achieves the highest recognition accuracy, followed by the hybrid system. The SV approach is thus not only theoretically well-founded but also superior in a practical application.

Web DOI [BibTex]

1997

Web DOI [BibTex]


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The view-graph approach to visual navigation and spatial memory

Mallot, H., Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN ’97, pages: 751-756, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes a purely visual navigation scheme based on two elementary mechanisms (piloting and guidance) and a graph structure combining individual navigation steps controlled by these mechanisms. In robot experiments in real environments, both mechanisms have been tested, piloting in an open environment and guidance in a maze with restricted movement opportunities. The results indicate that navigation and path planning can be brought about with these simple mechanisms. We argue that the graph of local views (snapshots) is a general and biologically plausible means of representing space and integrating the various mechanisms of map behaviour.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Predicting time series with support vector machines

Müller, K., Smola, A., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Kohlmorgen, J., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial Neural Networks: ICANN’97, pages: 999-1004, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. , C.J.C. Burges, A.J. Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks , October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Machines are used for time series prediction and compared to radial basis function networks. We make use of two different cost functions for Support Vectors: training with (i) an e insensitive loss and (ii) Huber's robust loss function and discuss how to choose the regularization parameters in these models. Two applications are considered: data from (a) a noisy (normal and uniform noise) Mackey Glass equation and (b) the Santa Fe competition (set D). In both cases Support Vector Machines show an excellent performance. In case (b) the Support Vector approach improves the best known result on the benchmark by a factor of 29%.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Predicting time series with support vectur machines

Müller, K., Smola, A., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Kohlmorgen, J., Vapnik, V.

In Artificial neural networks: ICANN ’97, pages: 999-1004, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks , October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Machines are used for time series prediction and compared to radial basis function networks. We make use of two different cost functions for Support Vectors: training with (i) an e insensitive loss and (ii) Huber's robust loss function and discuss how to choose the regularization parameters in these models. Two applications are considered: data from (a) a noisy (normal and uniform noise) Mackey Glass equation and (b) the Santa Fe competition (set D). In both cases Support Vector Machines show an excellent performance. In case (b) the Support Vector approach improves the best known result on the benchmark by a factor of 29%.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel principal component analysis

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Artificial neural networks: ICANN ’97, LNCS, vol. 1327, pages: 583-588, (Editors: W Gerstner and A Germond and M Hasler and J-D Nicoud), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 7th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, October 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
A new method for performing a nonlinear form of Principal Component Analysis is proposed. By the use of integral operator kernel functions, one can efficiently compute principal components in highdimensional feature spaces, related to input space by some nonlinear map; for instance the space of all possible d-pixel products in images. We give the derivation of the method and present experimental results on polynomial feature extraction for pattern recognition.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Homing by parameterized scene matching

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 4th European Conference on Artificial Life, (Eds.) P. Husbands, I. Harvey. MIT Press, Cambridge 1997, pages: 236-245, (Editors: P Husbands and I Harvey), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 4th European Conference on Artificial Life (ECAL97), July 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In visual homing tasks, animals as well as robots can compute their movements from the current view and a snapshot taken at a home position. Solving this problem exactly would require knowledge about the distances to visible landmarks, information, which is not directly available to passive vision systems. We propose a homing scheme that dispenses with accurate distance information by using parameterized disparity fields. These are obtained from an approximation that incorporates prior knowledge about perspective distortions of the visual environment. A mathematical analysis proves that the approximation does not prevent the scheme from approaching the goal with arbitrary accuracy. Mobile robot experiments are used to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Das Spiel mit dem künstlichen Leben.

Schölkopf, B.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, Wissenschaftsbeilage, June 1997 (misc)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Improving the accuracy and speed of support vector learning machines

Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9, pages: 375-381, (Editors: M Mozer and MJ Jordan and T Petsche), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Tenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), May 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Support Vector Learning Machines (SVM) are finding application in pattern recognition, regression estimation, and operator inversion for illposed problems . Against this very general backdrop any methods for improving the generalization performance, or for improving the speed in test phase of SVMs are of increasing interest. In this paper we combine two such techniques on a pattern recognition problem The method for improving generalization performance the "virtual support vector" method does so by incorporating known invariances of the problem This method achieves a drop in the error rate on 10.000 NIST test digit images of 1,4 % to 1 %. The method for improving the speed (the "reduced set" method) does so by approximating the support vector decision surface. We apply this method to achieve a factor of fifty speedup in test phase over the virtual support vector machine The combined approach yields a machine which is both 22 times faster than the original machine, and which has better generalization performance achieving 1,1 % error . The virtual support vector method is applicable to any SVM problem with known invariances The reduced set method is applicable to any support vector machine .

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Homing by parameterized scene matching

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Bülthoff, H.

(46), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, Febuary 1997 (techreport)

Abstract
In visual homing tasks, animals as well as robots can compute their movements from the current view and a snapshot taken at a home position. Solving this problem exactly would require knowledge about the distances to visible landmarks, information, which is not directly available to passive vision systems. We propose a homing scheme that dispenses with accurate distance information by using parameterized disparity fields. These are obtained from an approximation that incorporates prior knowledge about perspective distortions of the visual environment. A mathematical analysis proves that the approximation does not prevent the scheme from approaching the goal with arbitrary accuracy. Mobile robot experiments are used to demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning view graphs for robot navigation

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B., Georg, P., Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the 1st Intl. Conf. on Autonomous Agents, pages: 138-147, (Editors: Johnson, W.L.), ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, First International Conference on Autonomous Agents (AGENTS '97), Febuary 1997 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a purely vision-based scheme for learning a parsimonious representation of an open environment. Using simple exploration behaviours, our system constructs a graph of appropriately chosen views. To navigate between views connected in the graph, we employ a homing strategy inspired by findings of insect ethology. Simulations and robot experiments demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Masking by plaid patterns is not explained by adaptation, simple contrast gain-control or distortion products

Wichmann, F., Tollin, D.

Investigative Ophthamology and Visual Science, 38 (4), pages: S631, 1997 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Masking by plaid patterns: spatial frequency tuning and contrast dependency

Wichmann, F., Tollin, D.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 97, 1997 (poster)

Abstract
The detectability of horizontally orientated sinusoidal signals at different spatial-frequencies was measured in standard 2AFC - tasks in the presence of two-component plaid patterns of different orientation and contrast. The shape of the resulting masking surface provides insight into, and constrains models of, the underlying masking mechanisms.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

Vaziri, H., MD, .., RC, .., Davison, T., YS, .., CH, .., GG, .., Benchimol, S.

The European Molecular Biology Organization Journal, 16(19):6018-6033, 1997 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Support vector learning

Schölkopf, B.

pages: 173, Oldenbourg, München, Germany, 1997, Zugl.: Berlin, Techn. Univ., Diss., 1997 (book)

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

1995


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View-based cognitive map learning by an autonomous robot

Mallot, H., Bülthoff, H., Georg, P., Schölkopf, B., Yasuhara, K.

In Proceedings International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, vol. 2, pages: 381-386, (Editors: Fogelman-Soulié, F.), EC2, Paris, France, Conférence Internationale sur les Réseaux de Neurones Artificiels (ICANN '95), October 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper presents a view-based approach to map learning and navigation in mazes. By means of graph theory we have shown that the view-graph is a sufficient representation for map behaviour such as path planning. A neural network for unsupervised learning of the view-graph from sequences of views is constructed. We use a modified Kohonen (1988) learning rule that transforms temporal sequence (rather than featural similarity) into connectedness. In the main part of the paper, we present a robot implementation of the scheme. The results show that the proposed network is able to support map behaviour in simple environments.

PDF [BibTex]

1995

PDF [BibTex]


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Extracting support data for a given task

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

In First International Conference on Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (KDD-95), pages: 252-257, (Editors: UM Fayyad and R Uthurusamy), AAAI Press, Menlo Park, CA, USA, August 1995 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We report a novel possibility for extracting a small subset of a data base which contains all the information necessary to solve a given classification task: using the Support Vector Algorithm to train three different types of handwritten digit classifiers, we observed that these types of classifiers construct their decision surface from strongly overlapping small (k: 4%) subsets of the data base. This finding opens up the possibiiity of compressing data bases significantly by disposing of the data which is not important for the solution of a given task. In addition, we show that the theory allows us to predict the classifier that will have the best generalization ability, based solely on performance on the training set and characteristics of the learning machines. This finding is important for cases where the amount of available data is limited.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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View-Based Cognitive Mapping and Path Planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

Adaptive Behavior, 3(3):311-348, January 1995 (article)

Abstract
This article presents a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph, whose nodes correspond to the views whereas the labeled edges represent the movements leading from one view to another. By means of a graph theoretical reconstruction method, the view graph is shown to carry complete information on the topological and directional structure of the maze. Path planning can be carried out directly in the view graph without actually performing this reconstruction. A neural network is presented that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. It is based on an unsupervised competitive learning rule translating temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be encountered next, improving the view-recognition performance. Numerical simulations illustrate the network's ability for path planning and the recognition of views degraded by random noise. The results are compared to findings of behavioral neuroscience.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Suppression and creation of chaos in a periodically forced Lorenz system.

Franz, MO., Zhang, MH.

Physical Review, E 52, pages: 3558-3565, 1995 (article)

Abstract
Periodic forcing is introduced into the Lorenz model to study the effects of time-dependent forcing on the behavior of the system. Such a nonautonomous system stays dissipative and has a bounded attracting set which all trajectories finally enter. The possible kinds of attracting sets are restricted to periodic orbits and strange attractors. A large-scale survey of parameter space shows that periodic forcing has mainly three effects in the Lorenz system depending on the forcing frequency: (i) Fixed points are replaced by oscillations around them; (ii) resonant periodic orbits are created both in the stable and the chaotic region; (iii) chaos is created in the stable region near the resonance frequency and in periodic windows. A comparison to other studies shows that part of this behavior has been observed in simulations of higher truncations and real world experiments. Since very small modulations can already have a considerable effect, this suggests that periodic processes such as annual or diurnal cycles should not be omitted even in simple climate models.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A New Method for Constructing Artificial Neural Networks

Vapnik, V., Burges, C., Schölkopf, B.

AT & T Bell Laboratories, 1995 (techreport)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Image segmentation from motion: just the loss of high-spatial-frequency content ?

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

Perception, 24, pages: S19, 1995 (poster)

Abstract
The human contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is bandpass for stimuli of low temporal frequency but, for moving stimuli, results in a low-pass CSF with large high spatial-frequency losses. Thus the high spatial-frequency content of images moving on the retina cannot be seen; motion perception could be facilitated by, or even be based on, the selective loss of high spatial-frequency content. 2-AFC image segmentation experiments were conducted with segmentation based on motion or on form. In the latter condition, the form difference mirrored that produced by moving stimuli. This was accomplished by generating stimulus elements which were spectrally either broadband or low-pass. For the motion used, the spectral difference between static broadband and static low-pass elements matched the spectral difference between moving and static broadband elements. On the hypothesis that segmentation from motion is based on the detection of regions devoid of high spatial-frequencies, both tasks should be similarly difficult for human observers. However, neither image segmentation (nor, incidentally, motion detection) was sensitive to the high spatial-frequency content of the stimuli. Thus changes in perceptual form produced by moving stimuli appear not to be used as a cue for image segmentation.

[BibTex]