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Data-driven goodness-of-fit tests

Langovoy, MA.

Biologische Kybernetik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany, July 2007 (phdthesis)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Dirichlet Process Mixtures of Factor Analysers

Görür, D., Rasmussen, C.

Fifth Workshop on Bayesian Inference in Stochastic Processes (BSP5), June 2007 (talk)

Abstract
Mixture of factor analysers (MFA) is a well-known model that combines the dimensionality reduction technique of Factor Analysis (FA) with mixture modeling. The key issue in MFA is deciding on the latent dimension and the number of mixture components to be used. The Bayesian treatment of MFA has been considered by Beal and Ghahramani (2000) using variational approximation and by Fokoué and Titterington (2003) using birth-and –death Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). Here, we present the nonparametric MFA model utilizing a Dirichlet process (DP) prior on the component parameters (that is, the factor loading matrix and the mean vector of each component) and describe an MCMC scheme for inference. The clustering property of the DP provides automatic selection of the number of mixture components. The latent dimensionality of each component is inferred by automatic relevance determination (ARD). Identifying the action potentials of individual neurons from extracellular recordings, known as spike sorting, is a challenging clustering problem. We apply our model for clustering the waveforms recorded from the cortex of a macaque monkey.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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New BCI approaches: Selective Attention to Auditory and Tactile Stimulus Streams

Hill, N., Raths, C.

Invited talk at the PASCAL Workshop on Methods of Data Analysis in Computational Neuroscience and Brain Computer Interfaces, June 2007 (talk)

Abstract
When considering Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) development for patients in the most severely paralysed states, there is considerable motivation to move away from BCI systems based on either motor cortex activity, or on visual stimuli. Together these account for most of current BCI research. I present the results of our recent exploration of new auditory- and tactile-stimulus-driven BCIs. The talk includes a tutorial on the construction and interpretation of classifiers which extract spatio-temporal features from event-related potential data. The effects and implications of whitening are discussed, and preliminary results on the effectiveness of a low-rank constraint (Tomioka and Aihara 2007) are shown.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Towards Motor Skill Learning in Robotics

Peters, J.

Interactive Robot Learning - RSS workshop, June 2007 (talk)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Transductive Support Vector Machines for Structured Variables

Zien, A., Brefeld, U., Scheffer, T.

International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), June 2007 (talk)

Abstract
We study the problem of learning kernel machines transductively for structured output variables. Transductive learning can be reduced to combinatorial optimization problems over all possible labelings of the unlabeled data. In order to scale transductive learning to structured variables, we transform the corresponding non-convex, combinatorial, constrained optimization problems into continuous, unconstrained optimization problems. The discrete optimization parameters are eliminated and the resulting differentiable problems can be optimized efficiently. We study the effectiveness of the generalized TSVM on multiclass classification and label-sequence learning problems empirically.

PDF PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF PDF Web [BibTex]


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Impact of target-to-target interval on classification performance in the P300 speller

Martens, S., Hill, J., Farquhar, J., Schölkopf, B.

Scientific Meeting "Applied Neuroscience for Healthy Brain Function", May 2007 (talk)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Benchmarking of Policy Gradient Methods

Peters, J.

ADPRL Workshop, April 2007 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Nonparametric Bayesian Discrete Latent Variable Models for Unsupervised Learning

Görür, D.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, April 2007, published online (phdthesis)

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Applications of Kernel Machines to Structured Data

Eichhorn, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, March 2007, passed with "sehr gut", published online (phdthesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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A priori Knowledge from Non-Examples

Sinz, FH.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, March 2007 (diplomathesis)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Machine Learning for Mass Production and Industrial Engineering

Pfingsten, T.

Biologische Kybernetik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany, February 2007 (phdthesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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New Margin- and Evidence-Based Approaches for EEG Signal Classification

Hill, N., Farquhar, J.

Invited talk at the FaSor Jahressymposium, February 2007 (talk)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Development of a Brain-Computer Interface Approach Based on Covert Attention to Tactile Stimuli

Raths, C.

University of Tübingen, Germany, University of Tübingen, Germany, January 2007 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Machine Learning Approach for Estimating the Attenuation Map for a Combined PET/MR Scanner

Hofmann, M.

Biologische Kybernetik, Max-Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2007 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning of Motor Skills for Robotics

Peters, J.

University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 2007, clmc (phdthesis)

Abstract
Autonomous robots that can assist humans in situations of daily life have been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and cognitive sciences. A first step towards this goal is to create robots that can accomplish a multitude of different tasks, triggered by environmental context or higher level instruction. Early approaches to this goal during the heydays of artificial intelligence research in the late 1980s, however, made it clear that an approach purely based on reasoning and human insights would not be able to model all the perceptuomotor tasks that a robot should fulfill. Instead, new hope was put in the growing wake of machine learning that promised fully adaptive control algorithms which learn both by observation and trial-and-error. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to fulfill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator robotics, or even the new upcoming trend of humanoid robotics, and usually scaling was only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. In this thesis, we investigate the ingredients for a general approach to motor skill learning in order to get one step closer towards human-like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i.e., firstly, a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structures for task representation and execution and, secondly, appropriate learning algorithms which can be applied in this setting. As a theoretical foundation, we first study a general framework to generate control laws for real robots with a particular focus on skills represented as dynamical systems in differential constraint form. We present a point-wise optimal control framework resulting from a generalization of Gauss' principle and show how various well-known robot control laws can be derived by modifying the metric of the employed cost function. The framework has been successfully applied to task space tracking control for holonomic systems for several different metrics on the anthropomorphic SARCOS Master Arm. In order to overcome the limiting requirement of accurate robot models, we first employ learning methods to find learning controllers for task space control. However, when learning to execute a redundant control problem, we face the general problem of the non-convexity of the solution space which can force the robot to steer into physically impossible configurations if supervised learning methods are employed without further consideration. This problem can be resolved using two major insights, i.e., the learning problem can be treated as locally convex and the cost function of the analytical framework can be used to ensure global consistency. Thus, we derive an immediate reinforcement learning algorithm from the expectation-maximization point of view which leads to a reward-weighted regression technique. This method can be used both for operational space control as well as general immediate reward reinforcement learning problems. We demonstrate the feasibility of the resulting framework on the problem of redundant end-effector tracking for both a simulated 3 degrees of freedom robot arm as well as for a simulated anthropomorphic SARCOS Master Arm. While learning to execute tasks in task space is an essential component to a general framework to motor skill learning, learning the actual task is of even higher importance, particularly as this issue is more frequently beyond the abilities of analytical approaches than execution. We focus on the learning of elemental tasks which can serve as the "building blocks of movement generation", called motor primitives. Motor primitives are parameterized task representations based on splines or nonlinear differential equations with desired attractor properties. While imitation learning of parameterized motor primitives is a relatively well-understood problem, the self-improvement by interaction of the system with the environment remains a challenging problem, tackled in the fourth chapter of this thesis. For pursuing this goal, we highlight the difficulties with current reinforcement learning methods, and outline both established and novel algorithms for the gradient-based improvement of parameterized policies. We compare these algorithms in the context of motor primitive learning, and show that our most modern algorithm, the Episodic Natural Actor-Critic outperforms previous algorithms by at least an order of magnitude. We demonstrate the efficiency of this reinforcement learning method in the application of learning to hit a baseball with an anthropomorphic robot arm. In conclusion, in this thesis, we have contributed a general framework for analytically computing robot control laws which can be used for deriving various previous control approaches and serves as foundation as well as inspiration for our learning algorithms. We have introduced two classes of novel reinforcement learning methods, i.e., the Natural Actor-Critic and the Reward-Weighted Regression algorithm. These algorithms have been used in order to replace the analytical components of the theoretical framework by learned representations. Evaluations have been performed on both simulated and real robot arms.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Discrete vs. Continuous: Two Sides of Machine Learning

Zhou, D.

October 2004 (talk)

Abstract
We consider the problem of transductive inference. In many real-world problems, unlabeled data is far easier to obtain than labeled data. Hence transductive inference is very significant in many practical problems. According to Vapnik's point of view, one should predict the function value only on the given points directly rather than a function defined on the whole space, the latter being a more complicated problem. Inspired by this idea, we develop discrete calculus on finite discrete spaces, and then build discrete regularization. A family of transductive algorithms is naturally derived from this regularization framework. We validate the algorithms on both synthetic and real-world data from text/web categorization to bioinformatics problems. A significant by-product of this work is a powerful way of ranking data based on examples including images, documents, proteins and many other kinds of data. This talk is mainly based on the followiing contribution: (1) D. Zhou and B. Sch{\"o}lkopf: Transductive Inference with Graphs, MPI Technical report, August, 2004; (2) D. Zhou, B. Sch{\"o}lkopf and T. Hofmann. Semi-supervised Learning on Directed Graphs. NIPS 2004; (3) D. Zhou, O. Bousquet, T.N. Lal, J. Weston and B. Sch{\"o}lkopf. Learning with Local and Global Consistency. NIPS 2003.

PDF [BibTex]


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Independent component analysis and beyond

Harmeling, S.

Biologische Kybernetik, Universität Potsdam, Potsdam, October 2004 (phdthesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Grundlagen von Support Vector Maschinen und Anwendungen in der Bildverarbeitung

Eichhorn, J.

September 2004 (talk)

Abstract
Invited talk at the workshop "Numerical, Statistical and Discrete Methods in Image Processing" at the TU M{\"u}nchen (in GERMAN)

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel Methods in Computational Biology

Schölkopf, B., Tsuda, K., Vert, J.

pages: 410, Computational Molecular Biology, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, August 2004 (book)

Abstract
Modern machine learning techniques are proving to be extremely valuable for the analysis of data in computational biology problems. One branch of machine learning, kernel methods, lends itself particularly well to the difficult aspects of biological data, which include high dimensionality (as in microarray measurements), representation as discrete and structured data (as in DNA or amino acid sequences), and the need to combine heterogeneous sources of information. This book provides a detailed overview of current research in kernel methods and their applications to computational biology. Following three introductory chapters—an introduction to molecular and computational biology, a short review of kernel methods that focuses on intuitive concepts rather than technical details, and a detailed survey of recent applications of kernel methods in computational biology—the book is divided into three sections that reflect three general trends in current research. The first part presents different ideas for the design of kernel functions specifically adapted to various biological data; the second part covers different approaches to learning from heterogeneous data; and the third part offers examples of successful applications of support vector machine methods.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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The benefit of liquid Helium cooling for Cryo-Electron Tomography: A quantitative comparative study

Schweikert, G., Luecken, U., Pfeifer, G., Baumeister, W., Plitzko, J.

The thirteenth European Microscopy Congress, August 2004 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Riemannian Geometry on Graphs and its Application to Ranking and Classification

Zhou, D.

June 2004 (talk)

Abstract
We consider the problem of transductive inference. In many real-world problems, unlabeled data is far easier to obtain than labeled data. Hence transductive inference is very significant in many practical problems. According to Vapnik's point of view, one should predict the function value only on the given points directly rather than a function defined on the whole space, the latter being a more complicated problem. Inspired by this idea, we develop discrete calculus on finite discrete spaces, and then build discrete regularization. A family of transductive algorithms is naturally derived from this regularization framework. We validate the algorithms on both synthetic and real-world data from text/web categorization to bioinformatics problems. A significant by-product of this work is a powerful way of ranking data based on examples including images, documents, proteins and many other kinds of data.

PDF [BibTex]


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Exploration of combining Echo-State Network Learning with Recurrent Neural Network Learning techniques

Erhan, D.

Biologische Kybernetik, International University Bremen, Bremen, Germany, May 2004 (diplomathesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Computational Analysis of Gene Expression Data

Zien, A.

(4), Biologische Kybernetik, March 2004 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Learning from Labeled and Unlabeled Data: Semi-supervised Learning and Ranking

Zhou, D.

January 2004 (talk)

Abstract
We consider the general problem of learning from labeled and unlabeled data, which is often called semi-supervised learning or transductive inference. A principled approach to semi-supervised learning is to design a classifying function which is sufficiently smooth with respect to the intrinsic structure collectively revealed by known labeled and unlabeled points. We present a simple algorithm to obtain such a smooth solution. Our method yields encouraging experimental results on a number of classification problems and demonstrates effective use of unlabeled data.

PDF [BibTex]


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Introduction to Category Theory

Bousquet, O.

Internal Seminar, January 2004 (talk)

Abstract
A brief introduction to the general idea behind category theory with some basic definitions and examples. A perspective on higher dimensional categories is given.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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The p53 Oligomerization Domain: Sequence-Structure Relationships and the Design and Characterization of Altered Oligomeric States

Davison, TS.

University of Toronto, Canada, University of Toronto, Canada, 2004 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Statistical Learning with Similarity and Dissimilarity Functions

von Luxburg, U.

pages: 1-166, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, Technische Universität Berlin, Germany, 2004 (phdthesis)

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine

Graf, AAB.

Biologische Kybernetik, University of Tübingen, Germany, 2004, online publication (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Advanced Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Machine Learning Summer School, 2004 (talk)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]

2002


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Learning with Kernels: Support Vector Machines, Regularization, Optimization, and Beyond

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

pages: 644, Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2002, Parts of this book, including an introduction to kernel methods, can be downloaded here. (book)

Abstract
In the 1990s, a new type of learning algorithm was developed, based on results from statistical learning theory: the Support Vector Machine (SVM). This gave rise to a new class of theoretically elegant learning machines that use a central concept of SVMs-kernels—for a number of learning tasks. Kernel machines provide a modular framework that can be adapted to different tasks and domains by the choice of the kernel function and the base algorithm. They are replacing neural networks in a variety of fields, including engineering, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. Learning with Kernels provides an introduction to SVMs and related kernel methods. Although the book begins with the basics, it also includes the latest research. It provides all of the concepts necessary to enable a reader equipped with some basic mathematical knowledge to enter the world of machine learning using theoretically well-founded yet easy-to-use kernel algorithms and to understand and apply the powerful algorithms that have been developed over the last few years.

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Nonlinear Multivariate Analysis with Geodesic Kernels

Kuss, M.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Berlin, February 2002 (diplomathesis)

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Concentration Inequalities and Empirical Processes Theory Applied to the Analysis of Learning Algorithms

Bousquet, O.

Biologische Kybernetik, Ecole Polytechnique, 2002 (phdthesis) Accepted

Abstract
New classification algorithms based on the notion of 'margin' (e.g. Support Vector Machines, Boosting) have recently been developed. The goal of this thesis is to better understand how they work, via a study of their theoretical performance. In order to do this, a general framework for real-valued classification is proposed. In this framework, it appears that the natural tools to use are Concentration Inequalities and Empirical Processes Theory. Thanks to an adaptation of these tools, a new measure of the size of a class of functions is introduced, which can be computed from the data. This allows, on the one hand, to better understand the role of eigenvalues of the kernel matrix in Support Vector Machines, and on the other hand, to obtain empirical model selection criteria.

PostScript [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines: Induction Principle, Adaptive Tuning and Prior Knowledge

Chapelle, O.

Biologische Kybernetik, 2002 (phdthesis)

Abstract
This thesis presents a theoretical and practical study of Support Vector Machines (SVM) and related learning algorithms. In a first part, we introduce a new induction principle from which SVMs can be derived, but some new algorithms are also presented in this framework. In a second part, after studying how to estimate the generalization error of an SVM, we suggest to choose the kernel parameters of an SVM by minimizing this estimate. Several applications such as feature selection are presented. Finally the third part deals with the incoporation of prior knowledge in a learning algorithm and more specifically, we studied the case of known invariant transormations and the use of unlabeled data.

GZIP [BibTex]

2001


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Variationsverfahren zur Untersuchung von Grundzustandseigenschaften des Ein-Band Hubbard-Modells

Eichhorn, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden/Germany, May 2001 (diplomathesis)

Abstract
Using different modifications of a new variational approach, statical groundstate properties of the one-band Hubbard model such as energy and staggered magnetisation are calculated. By taking into account additional fluctuations, the method ist gradually improved so that a very good description of the energy in one and two dimensions can be achieved. After a detailed discussion of the application in one dimension, extensions for two dimensions are introduced. By use of a modified version of the variational ansatz in particular a description of the quantum phase transition for the magnetisation should be possible.

PostScript [BibTex]

2001

PostScript [BibTex]


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Cerebellar Control of Robot Arms

Peters, J.

Biologische Kybernetik, Technische Univeristät München, München, Germany, 2001 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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On Unsupervised Learning of Mixtures of Markov Sources

Seldin, Y.

Biologische Kybernetik, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, 2001 (diplomathesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines: Theorie und Anwendung auf Prädiktion epileptischer Anfälle auf der Basis von EEG-Daten

Lal, TN.

Biologische Kybernetik, Institut für Angewandte Mathematik, Universität Bonn, 2001, Advised by Prof. Dr. S. Albeverio (diplomathesis)

ZIP [BibTex]

ZIP [BibTex]

1999


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Some Aspects of Modelling Human Spatial Vision: Contrast Discrimination

Wichmann, F.

University of Oxford, University of Oxford, October 1999 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

1999

[BibTex]


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Apprentissage Automatique et Simplicite

Bousquet, O.

Biologische Kybernetik, 1999, In french (diplomathesis)

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Machine Learning and Language Acquisition: A Model of Child’s Learning of Turkish Morphophonology

Altun, Y.

Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 1999 (mastersthesis)

[BibTex]


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Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]