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1998


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Changes of cerebral blood flow during short-term exposure to normobaric hypoxia

Buck, A., Schirlo, C., Jasinsky, V., Weber, B., Burger, C., von Schulthess, G., Koller, E., Pavlicek, V.

J Cereb Blood Flow Metab, 18, pages: 906-910, 1998 (article)

[BibTex]

1998

[BibTex]


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Support Vector methods in learning and feature extraction

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K., Burges, C., Vapnik, V.

Ninth Australian Conference on Neural Networks, pages: 72-78, (Editors: T. Downs, M. Frean and M. Gallagher), 1998 (talk)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie in der psychopathologischen Forschung.

Spitzer, M., Kammer, T., Bellemann, M., Brix, G., Layer, B., Maier, S., Kischka, U., Gückel, F.

Fortschritte der Neurologie Psychiatrie, 66, pages: 241-258, 1998 (article)

Abstract
Mental disorders are characterised by psychopathological symptoms which correspond to functional brain states. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used for the non-invasive study of cerebral activation patterns in man. First of all, the neurobiological principles and presuppositions of the method are outlined. Results from the Heidelberg imaging lab on several simple sensorimotor tasks as well as higher cognitive functions, such as working and semantic memory, are then presented. Thereafter, results from preliminary fMRI studies of psychopathological symptoms are discussed, with emphasis on hallucinations, psychomotoric phenomena, emotions, as well as obsessions and compulsions. Functional MRI is limited by the physics underlying the method, as well as by practical constraints regarding its use in conjunction with mentally ill patients. Within this framework, the problems of signal-to-noise ratio, data analysis strategies, motion correction, and neurovascular coupling are considered. Because of the rapid development of the field of fMRI, maps of higher cognitive functions and their respective pathology seem to be coming within easy reach.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]

1995


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View-Based Cognitive Mapping and Path Planning

Schölkopf, B., Mallot, H.

Adaptive Behavior, 3(3):311-348, January 1995 (article)

Abstract
This article presents a scheme for learning a cognitive map of a maze from a sequence of views and movement decisions. The scheme is based on an intermediate representation called the view graph, whose nodes correspond to the views whereas the labeled edges represent the movements leading from one view to another. By means of a graph theoretical reconstruction method, the view graph is shown to carry complete information on the topological and directional structure of the maze. Path planning can be carried out directly in the view graph without actually performing this reconstruction. A neural network is presented that learns the view graph during a random exploration of the maze. It is based on an unsupervised competitive learning rule translating temporal sequence (rather than similarity) of views into connectedness in the network. The network uses its knowledge of the topological and directional structure of the maze to generate expectations about which views are likely to be encountered next, improving the view-recognition performance. Numerical simulations illustrate the network's ability for path planning and the recognition of views degraded by random noise. The results are compared to findings of behavioral neuroscience.

Web DOI [BibTex]

1995

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Suppression and creation of chaos in a periodically forced Lorenz system.

Franz, MO., Zhang, MH.

Physical Review, E 52, pages: 3558-3565, 1995 (article)

Abstract
Periodic forcing is introduced into the Lorenz model to study the effects of time-dependent forcing on the behavior of the system. Such a nonautonomous system stays dissipative and has a bounded attracting set which all trajectories finally enter. The possible kinds of attracting sets are restricted to periodic orbits and strange attractors. A large-scale survey of parameter space shows that periodic forcing has mainly three effects in the Lorenz system depending on the forcing frequency: (i) Fixed points are replaced by oscillations around them; (ii) resonant periodic orbits are created both in the stable and the chaotic region; (iii) chaos is created in the stable region near the resonance frequency and in periodic windows. A comparison to other studies shows that part of this behavior has been observed in simulations of higher truncations and real world experiments. Since very small modulations can already have a considerable effect, this suggests that periodic processes such as annual or diurnal cycles should not be omitted even in simple climate models.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]