Header logo is ei


2012


no image
A non-monotonic method for large-scale non-negative least squares

Kim, D., Sra, S., Dhillon, I. S.

Optimization Methods and Software, 28(5):1012-1039, Febuary 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

2012

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Inferring Networks of Diffusion and Influence

Gomez Rodriguez, M., Leskovec, J., Krause, A.

ACM Transactions on Knowledge Discovery from Data, 5(4:21), February 2012 (article)

Abstract
Information diffusion and virus propagation are fundamental processes taking place in networks. While it is often possible to directly observe when nodes become infected with a virus or publish the information, observing individual transmissions (who infects whom, or who influences whom) is typically very difficult. Furthermore, in many applications, the underlying network over which the diffusions and propagations spread is actually unobserved. We tackle these challenges by developing a method for tracing paths of diffusion and influence through networks and inferring the networks over which contagions propagate. Given the times when nodes adopt pieces of information or become infected, we identify the optimal network that best explains the observed infection times. Since the optimization problem is NP-hard to solve exactly, we develop an efficient approximation algorithm that scales to large datasets and finds provably near-optimal networks. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by tracing information diffusion in a set of 170 million blogs and news articles over a one year period to infer how information flows through the online media space. We find that the diffusion network of news for the top 1,000 media sites and blogs tends to have a core-periphery structure with a small set of core media sites that diffuse information to the rest of the Web. These sites tend to have stable circles of influence with more general news media sites acting as connectors between them.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Using probabilistic estimation of expression residuals (PEER) to obtain increased power and interpretability of gene expression analyses

Stegle, O., Parts, L., Piipari, M., Winn, J., Durbin, R.

Nature Protocols, 7(3):500–507, February 2012 (article)

Abstract
We present PEER (probabilistic estimation of expression residuals), a software package implementing statistical models that improve the sensitivity and interpretability of genetic associations in population-scale expression data. This approach builds on factor analysis methods that infer broad variance components in the measurements. PEER takes as input transcript profiles and covariates from a set of individuals, and then outputs hidden factors that explain much of the expression variability. Optionally, these factors can be interpreted as pathway or transcription factor activations by providing prior information about which genes are involved in the pathway or targeted by the factor. The inferred factors are used in genetic association analyses. First, they are treated as additional covariates, and are included in the model to increase detection power for mapping expression traits. Second, they are analyzed as phenotypes themselves to understand the causes of global expression variability. PEER extends previous related surrogate variable models and can be implemented within hours on a desktop computer.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Context-aware brain-computer interfaces: exploring the information space of user, technical system and environment

Zander, TO., Jatzev, S.

Journal of Neural Engineering, 9(1):016003, 10, February 2012 (article)

Abstract
Brain–computer interface (BCI) systems are usually applied in highly controlled environments such as research laboratories or clinical setups. However, many BCI-based applications are implemented in more complex environments. For example, patients might want to use a BCI system at home, and users without disabilities could benefit from BCI systems in special working environments. In these contexts, it might be more difficult to reliably infer information about brain activity, because many intervening factors add up and disturb the BCI feature space. One solution for this problem would be adding context awareness to the system. We propose to augment the available information space with additional channels carrying information about the user state, the environment and the technical system. In particular, passive BCI systems seem to be capable of adding highly relevant context information—otherwise covert aspects of user state. In this paper, we present a theoretical framework based on general human–machine system research for adding context awareness to a BCI system. Building on that, we present results from a study on a passive BCI, which allows access to the covert aspect of user state related to the perceived loss of control. This study is a proof of concept and demonstrates that context awareness could beneficially be implemented in and combined with a BCI system or a general human–machine system. The EEG data from this experiment are available for public download at www.phypa.org.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
How the initialization affects the stability of the k-means algorithm

Bubeck, S., Meila, M., von Luxburg, U.

ESAIM: Probability and Statistics, 16, pages: 436-452, January 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Joint Modelling of Confounding Factors and Prominent Genetic Regulators Provides Increased Accuracy in Genetical Genomics Studies

Fusi, N., Stegle, O., Lawrence, ND.

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(1):1-9, January 2012 (article)

Abstract
Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies are an integral tool to investigate the genetic component of gene expression variation. A major challenge in the analysis of such studies are hidden confounding factors, such as unobserved covariates or unknown subtle environmental perturbations. These factors can induce a pronounced artifactual correlation structure in the expression profiles, which may create spurious false associations or mask real genetic association signals. Here, we report PANAMA (Probabilistic ANAlysis of genoMic dAta), a novel probabilistic model to account for confounding factors within an eQTL analysis. In contrast to previous methods, PANAMA learns hidden factors jointly with the effect of prominent genetic regulators. As a result, this new model can more accurately distinguish true genetic association signals from confounding variation. We applied our model and compared it to existing methods on different datasets and biological systems. PANAMA consistently performs better than alternative methods, and finds in particular substantially more trans regulators. Importantly, our approach not only identifies a greater number of associations, but also yields hits that are biologically more plausible and can be better reproduced between independent studies. A software implementation of PANAMA is freely available online at http://ml.sheffield.ac.uk/qtl/.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Bayesian flexible fitting of biomolecular structures into EM maps

Habeck, M.

Biophysical journal, 2012 (article) Submitted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Measurement and Calibration of Noise Bias in Weak Lensing Galaxy Shape Estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), 2012 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
LMM-Lasso: A Lasso Multi-Marker Mixed Model for Association Mapping with Population Structure Correction

Rakitsch, B., Lippert, C., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM.

Bioinformatics, 29(2):206-214, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Structure and Dynamics of Diffusion Networks

Gomez Rodriguez, M.

Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, 2012 (phdthesis)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Existential neuroscience: a functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation of neural responses to reminders of one’s mortality

Quirin, M., Loktyushin, A., Arndt, J., Küstermann, E., Lo, Y., Kuhl, J., Eggert, L.

Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 7(2):193-198, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Active learning for domain adaptation in the supervised classification of remote sensing images

Persello, C., Bruzzone, L.

IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 50(11):4468-4483, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Blind Deconvolution in Scientific Imaging & Computational Photography

Hirsch, M.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2012 (phdthesis)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Reinforcement learning to adjust parametrized motor primitives to new situations

Kober, J., Wilhelm, A., Oztop, E., Peters, J.

Autonomous Robots, 33(4):361-379, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Humans manage to adapt learned movements very quickly to new situations by generalizing learned behaviors from similar situations. In contrast, robots currently often need to re-learn the complete movement. In this paper, we propose a method that learns to generalize parametrized motor plans by adapting a small set of global parameters, called meta-parameters. We employ reinforcement learning to learn the required meta-parameters to deal with the current situation, described by states. We introduce an appropriate reinforcement learning algorithm based on a kernelized version of the reward-weighted regression. To show its feasibility, we evaluate this algorithm on a toy example and compare it to several previous approaches. Subsequently, we apply the approach to three robot tasks, i.e., the generalization of throwing movements in darts, of hitting movements in table tennis, and of throwing balls where the tasks are learned on several different real physical robots, i.e., a Barrett WAM, a BioRob, the JST-ICORP/SARCOS CBi and a Kuka KR 6.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
On the Empirical Estimation of Integral Probability Metrics

Sriperumbudur, B., Fukumizu, K., Gretton, A., Schölkopf, B., Lanckriet, G.

Electronic Journal of Statistics, 6, pages: 1550-1599, 2012 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Effect of MR contrast agents on quantitative accuracy of PET in combined whole-body PET/MR imaging

Lois, C., Bezrukov, I., Schmidt, H., Schwenzer, N., Werner, M., Kupferschläger, J., Beyer, T.

European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, 39(11):1756-1766, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Multitask Learning in Computational Biology

Widmer, C., Rätsch, G.

JMLR W\&CP. ICML 2011 Unsupervised and Transfer Learning Workshop, 27, pages: 207-216, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Computational Biology provides a wide range of applications for Multitask Learning (MTL) methods. As the generation of labels often is very costly in the biomedical domain, combining data from different related problems or tasks is a promising strategy to reduce label cost. In this paper, we present two problems from sequence biology, where MTL was successfully applied. For this, we use regularization-based MTL methods, with a special focus on the case of a hierarchical relationship between tasks. Furthermore, we propose strategies to refine the measure of task relatedness, which is of central importance in MTL and finally give some practical guidelines, when MTL strategies are likely to pay off.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Arabidopsis defense against Botrytis cinerea: chronology and regulation deciphered by high-resolution temporal transcriptomic analysis

Windram, O., Madhou, P., McHattie, S., Hill, C., Hickman, R., Cooke, E., Jenkins, DJ., Penfold, CA., Baxter, Ll., Breeze, E., Kiddle, SJ., Rhodes, J., Atwell, S., Kliebenstein, D., Kim, Y-S., Stegle, O., Borgwardt, KM., others

The Plant Cell Online, 24(9):3530-3557, 2012, all authors: Oliver Windram,Priyadharshini Madhou,Stuart McHattie,Claire Hill,Richard Hickman,Emma Cooke,Dafyd J. Jenkins,Christopher A. Penfold,Laura Baxter,Emily Breeze,Steven J. Kiddle,Johanna Rhodes,Susanna Atwell,Daniel J. (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Improved Linear Mixed Models for Genome-Wide Association Studies

Listgarten, J., Lippert, C., Kadie, CM., Davidson, RI., Eskin, E., Heckerman, D.

Nature Methods, 9, pages: 525–526, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Calibration of Boltzmann distribution priors in Bayesian data analysis

Mechelke, M., Habeck, M.

Physical Review E, 86(6):066705, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
CSB: A Python framework for computational structural biology

Kalev, I., Mechelke, M., Kopec, K., Holder, T., Carstens, S., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 28(22):2996-2997, 2012 (article)

Abstract
Summary: Computational Structural Biology Toolbox (CSB) is a cross-platform Python class library for reading, storing and analyzing biomolecular structures with rich support for statistical analyses. CSB is designed for reusability and extensibility and comes with a clean, well-documented API following good object-oriented engineering practice. Availability: Stable release packages are available for download from the Python Package Index (PyPI), as well as from the project’s web site http://csb.codeplex.com.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Design of a Haptic Interface for a Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Simulation

Yu, S., Woo, H. S., Son, H. I., Ahn, W., Jung, H., Lee, D. Y., Yi, S. Y.

Advanced Robotics, 26(18):2115-2143, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Significant global reduction of carbon uptake by water-cycle driven extreme vegetation anomalies

Zscheischler, J., Mahecha, M., von Buttlar, J., Harmeling, S., Jung, M., Randerson, J., Reichstein, M.

Nature Geoscience, 2012 (article) In revision

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Mining correlated loci at a genome-wide scale

Velkov, V.

Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany, 2012 (mastersthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Measurement and calibration of noise bias in weak lensing galaxy shape estimation

Kacprzak, T., Zuntz, J., Rowe, B., Bridle, S., Refregier, A., Amara, A., Voigt, L., Hirsch, M.

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 427(4):2711-2722, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Image analysis for cosmology: results from the GREAT10 Galaxy Challenge

Kitching, T. D., Balan, S. T., Bridle, S., Cantale, N., Courbin, F., Eifler, T., Gentile, M., Gill, M. S. S., Harmeling, S., Heymans, C., others,

Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 423(4):3163-3208, Oxford University Press, 2012 (article)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
First SN Discoveries from the Dark Energy Survey

Abbott, T., Abdalla, F., Achitouv, I., Ahn, E., Aldering, G., Allam, S., Alonso, D., Amara, A., Annis, J., Antonik, M., others,

The Astronomer's Telegram, 4668, pages: 1, 2012 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
A sensorimotor paradigm for Bayesian model selection

Genewein, T, Braun, DA

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 6(291):1-16, October 2012 (article)

Abstract
Sensorimotor control is thought to rely on predictive internal models in order to cope efficiently with uncertain environments. Recently, it has been shown that humans not only learn different internal models for different tasks, but that they also extract common structure between tasks. This raises the question of how the motor system selects between different structures or models, when each model can be associated with a range of different task-specific parameters. Here we design a sensorimotor task that requires subjects to compensate visuomotor shifts in a three-dimensional virtual reality setup, where one of the dimensions can be mapped to a model variable and the other dimension to the parameter variable. By introducing probe trials that are neutral in the parameter dimension, we can directly test for model selection. We found that model selection procedures based on Bayesian statistics provided a better explanation for subjects’ choice behavior than simple non-probabilistic heuristics. Our experimental design lends itself to the general study of model selection in a sensorimotor context as it allows to separately query model and parameter variables from subjects.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Risk-Sensitivity in Bayesian Sensorimotor Integration

Grau-Moya, J, Ortega, PA, Braun, DA

PLoS Computational Biology, 8(9):1-7, sep 2012 (article)

Abstract
Information processing in the nervous system during sensorimotor tasks with inherent uncertainty has been shown to be consistent with Bayesian integration. Bayes optimal decision-makers are, however, risk-neutral in the sense that they weigh all possibilities based on prior expectation and sensory evidence when they choose the action with highest expected value. In contrast, risk-sensitive decision-makers are sensitive to model uncertainty and bias their decision-making processes when they do inference over unobserved variables. In particular, they allow deviations from their probabilistic model in cases where this model makes imprecise predictions. Here we test for risk-sensitivity in a sensorimotor integration task where subjects exhibit Bayesian information integration when they infer the position of a target from noisy sensory feedback. When introducing a cost associated with subjects' response, we found that subjects exhibited a characteristic bias towards low cost responses when their uncertainty was high. This result is in accordance with risk-sensitive decision-making processes that allow for deviations from Bayes optimal decision-making in the face of uncertainty. Our results suggest that both Bayesian integration and risk-sensitivity are important factors to understand sensorimotor integration in a quantitative fashion.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]

2008


no image
Modelling contrast discrimination data suggest both the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance to be caused by the same mechanism

Goris, R., Wagemans, J., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 8(15):1-21, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Computational models of spatial vision typically make use of a (rectified) linear filter, a nonlinearity and dominant late noise to account for human contrast discrimination data. Linear–nonlinear cascade models predict an improvement in observers' contrast detection performance when low, subthreshold levels of external noise are added (i.e., stochastic resonance). Here, we address the issue whether a single contrast gain-control model of early spatial vision can account for both the pedestal effect, i.e., the improved detectability of a grating in the presence of a low-contrast masking grating, and stochastic resonance. We measured contrast discrimination performance without noise and in both weak and moderate levels of noise. Making use of a full quantitative description of our data with few parameters combined with comprehensive model selection assessments, we show the pedestal effect to be more reduced in the presence of weak noise than in moderate noise. This reduction rules out independent, additive sources of performance improvement and, together with a simulation study, supports the parsimonious explanation that a single mechanism underlies the pedestal effect and stochastic resonance in contrast perception.

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
The Effect of Mutual Information on Independent Component Analysis in EEG/MEG Analysis: A Simulation Study

Neumann, A., Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M., Gramann, K.

International Journal of Neuroscience, 118(11):1534-1546, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Objective: This study investigated the influence of mutual information (MI) on temporal and dipole reconstruction based on independent components (ICs) derived from independent component analysis (ICA). Method: Artificial electroencephalogram (EEG) datasets were created by means of a neural mass model simulating cortical activity of two neural sources within a four-shell spherical head model. Mutual information between neural sources was systematicallyvaried. Results: Increasing spatial error for reconstructed locations of ICs with increasing MI was observed. By contrast, the reconstruction error for the time course of source activity was largely independent of MI but varied systematically with Gaussianity of the sources. Conclusion: Independent component analysis is a viable tool for analyzing the temporal activity of EEG/MEG (magnetoencephalography) sources even if the underlying neural sources are mutually dependent. However, if ICA is used as a preprocessing algorithm for source localization, mutual information between sources introduces a bias in the reconstructed locations of the sources. Significance: Studies using ICA-algorithms based on MI have to be aware of possible errors in the spatial reconstruction of sources if these are coupled with other neural sources.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
gBoost: A Mathematical Programming Approach to Graph Classification and Regression

Saigo, H., Nowozin, S., Kadowaki, T., Kudo, T., Tsuda, K.

Machine Learning, 75(1):69-89, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Graph mining methods enumerate frequently appearing subgraph patterns, which can be used as features for subsequent classification or regression. However, frequent patterns are not necessarily informative for the given learning problem. We propose a mathematical programming boosting method (gBoost) that progressively collects informative patterns. Compared to AdaBoost, gBoost can build the prediction rule with fewer iterations. To apply the boosting method to graph data, a branch-and-bound pattern search algorithm is developed based on the DFS code tree. The constructed search space is reused in later iterations to minimize the computation time. Our method can learn more efficiently than the simpler method based on frequent substructure mining, because the output labels are used as an extra information source for pruning the search space. Furthermore, by engineering the mathematical program, a wide range of machine learning problems can be solved without modifying the pattern search algorithm.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Machine Learning for Motor Skills in Robotics

Peters, J.

K{\"u}nstliche Intelligenz, 2008(4):41-43, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Autonomous robots that can adapt to novel situations has been a long standing vision of robotics, artificial intelligence, and the cognitive sciences. Early approaches to this goal during the heydays of artificial intelligence research in the late 1980s, however, made it clear that an approach purely based on reasoning or human insights would not be able to model all the perceptuomotor tasks of future robots. Instead, new hope was put in the growing wake of machine learning that promised fully adaptive control algorithms which learn both by observation and trial-and-error. However, to date, learning techniques have yet to fulfill this promise as only few methods manage to scale into the high-dimensional domains of manipulator and humanoid robotics and usually scaling was only achieved in precisely pre-structured domains. We have investigated the ingredients for a general approach to motor skill learning in order to get one step closer towards human-like performance. For doing so, we study two major components for such an approach, i.e., firstly, a theoretically well-founded general approach to representing the required control structures for task representation and execution and, secondly, appropriate learning algorithms which can be applied in this setting.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernels, Regularization and Differential Equations

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

Pattern Recognition, 41(11):3271-3286, November 2008 (article)

Abstract
Many common machine learning methods such as Support Vector Machines or Gaussian process inference make use of positive definite kernels, reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, Gaussian processes, and regularization operators. In this work these objects are presented in a general, unifying framework, and interrelations are highlighted. With this in mind we then show how linear stochastic differential equation models can be incorporated naturally into the kernel framework. And vice versa, many kernel machines can be interpreted in terms of differential equations. We focus especially on ordinary differential equations, also known as dynamical systems, and it is shown that standard kernel inference algorithms are equivalent to Kalman filter methods based on such models. In order not to cloud qualitative insights with heavy mathematical machinery, we restrict ourselves to finite domains, implying that differential equations are treated via their corresponding finite difference equations.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
The genome of the simian and human malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

Pain, A., Böhme, U., Berry, A., Mungall, K., Finn, R., Jackson, A., Mourier, T., Mistry, J., Pasini, E., Aslett, M., Balasubrammaniam, S., Borgwardt, K., Brooks, K., Carret, C., Carver, T., Cherevach, I., Chillingworth, T., Clarke, T., Galinski, M., Hall, N., Harper, D., Harris, D., Hauser, H., Ivens, A., Janssen, C., Keane, T., Larke, N., Lapp, S., Marti, M., Moule, S., Meyer, I., Ormond, D., Peters, N., Sanders, M., Sanders, T., Sergeant, T., Simmonds, M., Smith, F., Squares, R., Thurston, S., Tivey, A., Walker, D., White, B., Zuiderwijk, E., Churcher, C., Quail, M., Cowman, A., Turner, C., Rajandream, M., Kocken, C., Thomas, A., Newbold, C., Barrell, B., Berriman, M.

Nature, 455(7214):799-803, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
Plasmodium knowlesi is an intracellular malaria parasite whose natural vertebrate host is Macaca fascicularis (the 'kra' monkey); however, it is now increasingly recognized as a significant cause of human malaria, particularly in southeast Asia1, 2. Plasmodium knowlesi was the first malaria parasite species in which antigenic variation was demonstrated3, and it has a close phylogenetic relationship to Plasmodium vivax 4, the second most important species of human malaria parasite (reviewed in ref. 4). Despite their relatedness, there are important phenotypic differences between them, such as host blood cell preference, absence of a dormant liver stage or 'hypnozoite' in P. knowlesi, and length of the asexual cycle (reviewed in ref. 4). Here we present an analysis of the P. knowlesi (H strain, Pk1(A+) clone5) nuclear genome sequence. This is the first monkey malaria parasite genome to be described, and it provides an opportunity for comparison with the recently completed P. vivax genome4 and other sequenced Plasmodium genomes6, 7, 8. In contrast to other Plasmodium genomes, putative variant antigen families are dispersed throughout the genome and are associated with intrachromosomal telomere repeats. One of these families, the KIRs9, contains sequences that collectively match over one-half of the host CD99 extracellular domain, which may represent an unusual form of molecular mimicry.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
A BOLD window into brain waves

Balduzzi, D., Riedner, B., Tononi, G.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(41):15641-15642 , October 2008 (article)

Abstract
The brain is never inactive. Neurons fire at leisurely rates most of the time, even in sleep (1), although occasionally they fire more intensely, for example, when presented with certain stimuli. Coordinated changes in the activity and excitability of many neurons underlie spontaneous fluctuations in the electroencephalogram (EEG), first observed almost a century ago. These fluctuations can be very slow (infraslow oscillations, <0.1 Hz; slow oscillations, <1 Hz; and slow waves or delta waves, 1–4 Hz), intermediate (theta, 4–8 Hz; alpha, 8–12 Hz; and beta, 13–20 Hz), and fast (gamma, >30 Hz). Moreover, slower fluctuations appear to group and modulate faster ones (1, 2). The BOLD signal underlying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) also exhibits spontaneous fluctuations at the timescale of tens of seconds (infraslow, <0.1 Hz), which occurs at all times, during task-performance as well as during quiet wakefulness, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM sleep (NREM). Although the precise mechanism underlying the BOLD signal is still being investigated (3–5), it is becoming clear that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations are not just noise, but are tied to fluctuations in neural activity. In this issue of PNAS, He et al. (6) have been able to directly investigate the relationship between BOLD fluctuations and fluctuations in the brain's electrical activity in human subjects. He et al. (6) took advantage of the seminal observation by Biswal et al. (7) that spontaneous BOLD fluctuations in regions belonging to the same functional system are strongly correlated. As expected, He et al. saw that fMRI BOLD fluctuations were strongly correlated among regions within the sensorimotor system, but much less between sensorimotor regions and control regions (nonsensorimotor). The twist was that they did the fMRI recordings in subjects who had been implanted with intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) electrodes to record regional EEG signals (to localize epileptic foci). In a separate session, He et al. examined correlations in EEG signals between different regions. They found that, just like the BOLD fluctuations, infraslow and slow fluctuations in the EEG signal from sensorimotor-sensorimotor pairs of electrodes were positively correlated, whereas signals from sensorimotor-control pairs were not. Moreover, the correlation persisted across arousal states: in waking, NREM, and REM sleep. Finally, using several statistical approaches, they found a remarkable correspondence between regional correlations in the infraslow BOLD signal and regional correlations in the infraslow-slow EEG signal (<0.5 Hz or 1–4 Hz). Notably, another report has just appeared showing that mirror sites of auditory cortex across the two hemispheres, which show correlated BOLD activity, also show correlated infraslow EEG fluctuations recorded with ECoG electrodes (8). In this case, the correlated fluctuations reflected infraslow changes in EEG power in the gamma range [however, no significant correlations were found for slow ECoG frequencies (1–4 Hz)].

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Mixture Models for Protein Structure Ensembles

Hirsch, M., Habeck, M.

Bioinformatics, 24(19):2184-2192, October 2008 (article)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Structure of the human voltage-dependent anion channel

Bayrhuber, M., Meins, T., Habeck, M., Becker, S., Giller, K., Villinger, S., Vonrhein, C., Griesinger, C., Zweckstetter, M., Zeth, K.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 105(40):15370-15375, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as mitochondrial porin, is the most abundant protein in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). VDAC is the channel known to guide the metabolic flux across the MOM and plays a key role in mitochondrially induced apoptosis. Here, we present the 3D structure of human VDAC1, which was solved conjointly by NMR spectroscopy and x-ray crystallography. Human VDAC1 (hVDAC1) adopts a &amp;#946;-barrel architecture composed of 19 &amp;#946;-strands with an &amp;#945;-helix located horizontally midway within the pore. Bioinformatic analysis indicates that this channel architecture is common to all VDAC proteins and is adopted by the general import pore TOM40 of mammals, which is also located in the MOM.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
MRI-Based Attenuation Correction for PET/MRI: A Novel Approach Combining Pattern Recognition and Atlas Registration

Hofmann, M., Steinke, F., Scheel, V., Charpiat, G., Farquhar, J., Aschoff, P., Brady, M., Schölkopf, B., Pichler, B.

Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 49(11):1875-1883, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
For quantitative PET information, correction of tissue photon attenuation is mandatory. Generally in conventional PET, the attenuation map is obtained from a transmission scan, which uses a rotating radionuclide source, or from the CT scan in a combined PET/CT scanner. In the case of PET/MRI scanners currently under development, insufficient space for the rotating source exists; the attenuation map can be calculated from the MR image instead. This task is challenging because MR intensities correlate with proton densities and tissue-relaxation properties, rather than with attenuation-related mass density. METHODS: We used a combination of local pattern recognition and atlas registration, which captures global variation of anatomy, to predict pseudo-CT images from a given MR image. These pseudo-CT images were then used for attenuation correction, as the process would be performed in a PET/CT scanner. RESULTS: For human brain scans, we show on a database of 17 MR/CT image pairs that our method reliably enables e stimation of a pseudo-CT image from the MR image alone. On additional datasets of MRI/PET/CT triplets of human brain scans, we compare MRI-based attenuation correction with CT-based correction. Our approach enables PET quantification with a mean error of 3.2% for predefined regions of interest, which we found to be clinically not significant. However, our method is not specific to brain imaging, and we show promising initial results on 1 whole-body animal dataset. CONCLUSION: This method allows reliable MRI-based attenuation correction for human brain scans. Further work is necessary to validate the method for whole-body imaging.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Support Vector Machines and Kernels for Computational Biology

Ben-Hur, A., Ong, C., Sonnenburg, S., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

PLoS Computational Biology, 4(10: e1000173):1-10, October 2008 (article)

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Approximations for Binary Gaussian Process Classification

Nickisch, H., Rasmussen, C.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 9, pages: 2035-2078, October 2008 (article)

Abstract
We provide a comprehensive overview of many recent algorithms for approximate inference in Gaussian process models for probabilistic binary classification. The relationships between several approaches are elucidated theoretically, and the properties of the different algorithms are corroborated by experimental results. We examine both 1) the quality of the predictive distributions and 2) the suitability of the different marginal likelihood approximations for model selection (selecting hyperparameters) and compare to a gold standard based on MCMC. Interestingly, some methods produce good predictive distributions although their marginal likelihood approximations are poor. Strong conclusions are drawn about the methods: The Expectation Propagation algorithm is almost always the method of choice unless the computational budget is very tight. We also extend existing methods in various ways, and provide unifying code implementing all approaches.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Interactive images

Schölkopf, B., Toyama, K., Uyttendaele, M.

United States Patent, No 7444015, October 2008 (patent)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Interactive images

Schölkopf, B., Toyama, K., Uyttendaele, M.

United States Patent, No 7444016, October 2008 (patent)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Accurate NMR Structures Through Minimization of an Extended Hybrid Energy

Nilges, M., Bernard, A., Bardiaux, B., Malliavin, T., Habeck, M., Rieping, W.

Structure, 16(9):1305-1312, September 2008 (article)

Abstract
The use of generous distance bounds has been the hallmark of NMR structure determination. However, bounds necessitate the estimation of data quality before the calculation, reduce the information content, introduce human bias, and allow for major errors in the structures. Here, we propose a new rapid structure calculation scheme based on Bayesian analysis. The minimization of an extended energy function, including a new type of distance restraint and a term depending on the data quality, results in an estimation of the data quality in addition to coordinates. This allows for the determination of the optimal weight on the experimental information. The resulting structures are of better quality and closer to the X–ray crystal structure of the same molecule. With the new calculation approach, the analysis of discrepancies from the target distances becomes meaningful. The strategy may be useful in other applications—for example, in homology modeling.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]