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2003


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Hierarchical Spatio-Temporal Morphable Models for Representation of complex movements for Imitation Learning

Ilg, W., Bakir, GH., Franz, MO., Giese, M.

In 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, (2):453-458, (Editors: Nunes, U., A. de Almeida, A. Bejczy, K. Kosuge and J.A.T. Machado), 11th International Conference on Advanced Robotics, January 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

2003

PDF [BibTex]


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Modeling Data using Directional Distributions

Dhillon, I., Sra, S.

Univ. of Texas at Austin, January 2003 (techreport)

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ., Williamson, RC.

In pages: 495-502, 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Variable and Feature Selection.

Guyon, I., Elisseeff, A.

Journal of Machine Learning, 3, pages: 1157-1182, 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Feature Selection for Support Vector Machines by Means of Genetic Algorithms

Fröhlich, H., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, pages: 142-148, 15th IEEE International Conference on Tools with AI, 2003 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Propagation of Uncertainty in Bayesian Kernel Models - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Larsen, J., Rasmussen, CE.

In IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2, pages: 701-704, IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The object of Bayesian modelling is the predictive distribution, which in a forecasting scenario enables improved estimates of forecasted values and their uncertainties. In this paper we focus on reliably estimating the predictive mean and variance of forecasted values using Bayesian kernel based models such as the Gaussian Process and the Relevance Vector Machine. We derive novel analytic expressions for the predictive mean and variance for Gaussian kernel shapes under the assumption of a Gaussian input distribution in the static case, and of a recursive Gaussian predictive density in iterative forecasting. The capability of the method is demonstrated for forecasting of time-series and compared to approximate methods.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Clustering of Images using their Joint Segmentation

Seldin, Y., Starik, S., Werman, M.

In The 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV 2003), pages: 1-24, 3rd International Workshop on Statistical and Computational Theories of Vision (SCTV), 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A Note on Parameter Tuning for On-Line Shifting Algorithms

Bousquet, O.

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
In this short note, building on ideas of M. Herbster [2] we propose a method for automatically tuning the parameter of the FIXED-SHARE algorithm proposed by Herbster and Warmuth [3] in the context of on-line learning with shifting experts. We show that this can be done with a memory requirement of $O(nT)$ and that the additional loss incurred by the tuning is the same as the loss incurred for estimating the parameter of a Bernoulli random variable.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Dynamics of a rigid body in a Stokes fluid

Gonzalez, O., Graf, ABA., Maddocks, JH.

Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2003 (article) Accepted

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A novel transient heater-foil technique for liquid crystal experiments on film cooled surfaces

Vogel, G., Graf, ABA., von Wolfersdorf, J., Weigand, B.

ASME Journal of Turbomachinery, 125, pages: 529-537, 2003 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks (2nd edition), pages: 1119-1125, (Editors: MA Arbib), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Prediction at an Uncertain Input for Gaussian Processes and Relevance Vector Machines - Application to Multiple-Step Ahead Time-Series Forecasting

Quiñonero-Candela, J., Girard, A., Rasmussen, C.

(IMM-2003-18), Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 2003 (techreport)

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Large margin Methods in Label Sequence Learning

Altun, Y.

Brown University, Providence, RI, USA, 2003 (mastersthesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Kernel Methods and Their Applications to Signal Processing

Bousquet, O., Perez-Cruz, F.

In Proceedings. (ICASSP ‘03), Special Session on Kernel Methods, pages: 860 , ICASSP, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently introduced in Machine Learning, the notion of kernels has drawn a lot of interest as it allows to obtain non-linear algorithms from linear ones in a simple and elegant manner. This, in conjunction with the introduction of new linear classification methods such as the Support Vector Machines has produced significant progress. The successes of such algorithms is now spreading as they are applied to more and more domains. Many Signal Processing problems, by their non-linear and high-dimensional nature may benefit from such techniques. We give an overview of kernel methods and their recent applications.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Predictive control with Gaussian process models

Kocijan, J., Murray-Smith, R., Rasmussen, CE., Likar, B.

In Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon 2003: Computer as a Tool, pages: 352-356, (Editors: Zajc, B. and M. Tkal), Proceedings of IEEE Region 8 Eurocon: Computer as a Tool, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper describes model-based predictive control based on Gaussian processes.Gaussian process models provide a probabilistic non-parametric modelling approach for black-box identification of non-linear dynamic systems. It offers more insight in variance of obtained model response, as well as fewer parameters to determine than other models. The Gaussian processes can highlight areas of the input space where prediction quality is poor, due to the lack of data or its complexity, by indicating the higher variance around the predicted mean. This property is used in predictive control, where optimisation of control signal takes the variance information into account. The predictive control principle is demonstrated on a simulated example of nonlinear system.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Extension of the nu-SVM range for classification

Perez-Cruz, F., Weston, J., Herrmann, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Learning Theory: Methods, Models and Applications, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, Vol. 190, 190, pages: 179-196, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Sciences, (Editors: J Suykens and G Horvath and S Basu and C Micchelli and J Vandewalle), IOS Press, Amsterdam, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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m-Alternative Forced Choice—Improving the Efficiency of the Method of Constant Stimuli

Jäkel, F.

Biologische Kybernetik, Graduate School for Neural and Behavioural Sciences, Tübingen, 2003 (diplomathesis)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microarrays: How Many Do You Need?

Zien, A., Fluck, J., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Journal of Computational Biology, 10(3-4):653-667, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. We show that current knowledge allows for the construction of models that look realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes and derive prototypical parameters from real data sets. Such models allow investigation of the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class, the fold changes in expression that are desired to be detected, the detection sensitivity of the microarrays, and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at www.scai.fhg.de/special/bio/howmanyarrays/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular settings.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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New Approaches to Statistical Learning Theory

Bousquet, O.

Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 55(2):371-389, 2003 (article)

Abstract
We present new tools from probability theory that can be applied to the analysis of learning algorithms. These tools allow to derive new bounds on the generalization performance of learning algorithms and to propose alternative measures of the complexity of the learning task, which in turn can be used to derive new learning algorithms.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Distance-based classification with Lipschitz functions

von Luxburg, U., Bousquet, O.

In Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, pages: 314-328, (Editors: Schölkopf, B. and M.K. Warmuth), Learning Theory and Kernel Machines, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The goal of this article is to develop a framework for large margin classification in metric spaces. We want to find a generalization of linear decision functions for metric spaces and define a corresponding notion of margin such that the decision function separates the training points with a large margin. It will turn out that using Lipschitz functions as decision functions, the inverse of the Lipschitz constant can be interpreted as the size of a margin. In order to construct a clean mathematical setup we isometrically embed the given metric space into a Banach space and the space of Lipschitz functions into its dual space. Our approach leads to a general large margin algorithm for classification in metric spaces. To analyze this algorithm, we first prove a representer theorem. It states that there exists a solution which can be expressed as linear combination of distances to sets of training points. Then we analyze the Rademacher complexity of some Lipschitz function classes. The generality of the Lipschitz approach can be seen from the fact that several well-known algorithms are special cases of the Lipschitz algorithm, among them the support vector machine, the linear programming machine, and the 1-nearest neighbor classifier.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B.

In Recent Advances and Trends in Nonparametric Statistics , pages: 3-17, (Editors: MG Akritas and DN Politis), Elsevier, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods in Bioinformatics

Schölkopf, B., Guyon, I., Weston, J.

In Artificial Intelligence and Heuristic Methods in Bioinformatics, 183, pages: 1-21, 3, (Editors: P Frasconi und R Shamir), IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Interactive Images

Toyama, K., Schölkopf, B.

(MSR-TR-2003-64), Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK, 2003 (techreport)

Abstract
Interactive Images are a natural extension of three recent developments: digital photography, interactive web pages, and browsable video. An interactive image is a multi-dimensional image, displayed two dimensions at a time (like a standard digital image), but with which a user can interact to browse through the other dimensions. One might consider a standard video sequence viewed with a video player as a simple interactive image with time as the third dimension. Interactive images are a generalization of this idea, in which the third (and greater) dimensions may be focus, exposure, white balance, saturation, and other parameters. Interaction is handled via a variety of modes including those we call ordinal, pixel-indexed, cumulative, and comprehensive. Through exploration of three novel forms of interactive images based on color, exposure, and focus, we will demonstrate the compelling nature of interactive images.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Semi-Supervised Learning through Principal Directions Estimation

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B., Weston, J.

In ICML Workshop, The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, pages: 7, ICML Workshop: The Continuum from Labeled to Unlabeled Data in Machine Learning & Data Mining, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe methods for taking into account unlabeled data in the training of a kernel-based classifier, such as a Support Vector Machines (SVM). We propose two approaches utilizing unlabeled points in the vicinity of labeled ones. Both of the approaches effectively modify the metric of the pattern space, either by using non-spherical Gaussian density estimates which are determined using EM, or by modifying the kernel function using displacement vectors computed from pairs of unlabeled and labeled points. The latter is linked to techniques for training invariant SVMs. We present experimental results indicating that the proposed technique can lead to substantial improvements of classification accuracy.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Statistical Learning and Kernel Methods

Navia-Vázquez, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Adaptivity and Learning—An Interdisciplinary Debate, pages: 161-186, (Editors: R.Kühn and R Menzel and W Menzel and U Ratsch and MM Richter and I-O Stamatescu), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Short Introduction to Learning with Kernels

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the Machine Learning Summer School, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 2600, pages: 41-64, LNAI 2600, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bayesian Kernel Methods

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advanced Lectures on Machine Learning, Machine Learning Summer School 2002, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2600, LNAI 2600, pages: 65-117, 0, (Editors: S Mendelson and AJ Smola), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 2003 (inbook)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Gene expression in chondrocytes assessed with use of microarrays

Aigner, T., Zien, A., Hanisch, D., Zimmer, R.

Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 85(Suppl 2):117-123, 2003 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Machine Learning with Hyperkernels

Ong, CS., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 568-575, 2003 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Gaussian Processes to Speed up Hybrid Monte Carlo for Expensive Bayesian Integrals

Rasmussen, CE.

In Bayesian Statistics 7, pages: 651-659, (Editors: J. M. Bernardo, M. J. Bayarri, J. O. Berger, A. P. Dawid, D. Heckerman, A. F. M. Smith and M. West), Bayesian Statistics 7, 2003 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) is often the method of choice for computing Bayesian integrals that are not analytically tractable. However the success of this method may require a very large number of evaluations of the (un-normalized) posterior and its partial derivatives. In situations where the posterior is computationally costly to evaluate, this may lead to an unacceptable computational load for HMC. I propose to use a Gaussian Process model of the (log of the) posterior for most of the computations required by HMC. Within this scheme only occasional evaluation of the actual posterior is required to guarantee that the samples generated have exactly the desired distribution, even if the GP model is somewhat inaccurate. The method is demonstrated on a 10 dimensional problem, where 200 evaluations suffice for the generation of 100 roughly independent points from the posterior. Thus, the proposed scheme allows Bayesian treatment of models with posteriors that are computationally demanding, such as models involving computer simulation.

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]

PDF PostScript Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction Based on Orthogonality — a Decorrelation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Artificial Neural Networks and Neural Information Processing - ICANN/ICONIP 2003, pages: 132-139, (Editors: O Kaynak and E Alpaydin and E Oja and L Xu), Springer, Berlin, Germany, International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks and International Conference on Neural Information Processing, ICANN/ICONIP, 2003, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Volume 2714 (inproceedings)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Stability of ensembles of kernel machines

Elisseeff, A., Pontil, M.

In 190, pages: 111-124, NATO Science Series III: Computer and Systems Science, (Editors: Suykens, J., G. Horvath, S. Basu, C. Micchelli and J. Vandewalle), IOS press, Netherlands, 2003 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Models of contrast transfer as a function of presentation time and spatial frequency.

Wichmann, F.

2003 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast transduction is essential for understanding spatial vision. Using standard 2AFC contrast discrimination experiments conducted using a carefully calibrated display we previously showed that the shape of the threshold versus (pedestal) contrast (TvC) curve changes with presentation time and the performance level defined as threshold (Wichmann, 1999; Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Additional experiments looked at the change of the TvC curve with spatial frequency (Bird, Henning & Wichmann, 2002), and at how to constrain the parameters of models of contrast processing (Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results both across spatial frequency and presentation time. An extensive model-selection exploration was performed using Bayesian confidence regions for the fitted parameters as well as cross-validation methods. Bird, C.M., G.B. Henning and F.A. Wichmann (2002). Contrast discrimination with sinusoidal gratings of different spatial frequency. Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 19, 1267-1273. Wichmann, F.A. (1999). Some aspects of modelling human spatial vision: contrast discrimination. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, The University of Oxford. Wichmann, F.A. & Henning, G.B. (1999). Implications of the Pedestal Effect for Models of Contrast-Processing and Gain-Control. OSA Annual Meeting Program, 62. Wichmann, F.A. (2002). Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 2, 7a.

[BibTex]

2002


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Real-Time Statistical Learning for Oculomotor Control and Visuomotor Coordination

Vijayakumar, S., Souza, A., Peters, J., Conradt, J., Rutkowski, T., Ijspeert, A., Nakanishi, J., Inoue, M., Shibata, T., Wiryo, A., Itti, L., Amari, S., Schaal, S.

(Editors: Becker, S. , S. Thrun, K. Obermayer), Sixteenth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), December 2002 (poster)

Web [BibTex]

2002

Web [BibTex]


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Learning with Kernels: Support Vector Machines, Regularization, Optimization, and Beyond

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

pages: 644, Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, December 2002, Parts of this book, including an introduction to kernel methods, can be downloaded here. (book)

Abstract
In the 1990s, a new type of learning algorithm was developed, based on results from statistical learning theory: the Support Vector Machine (SVM). This gave rise to a new class of theoretically elegant learning machines that use a central concept of SVMs-kernels—for a number of learning tasks. Kernel machines provide a modular framework that can be adapted to different tasks and domains by the choice of the kernel function and the base algorithm. They are replacing neural networks in a variety of fields, including engineering, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. Learning with Kernels provides an introduction to SVMs and related kernel methods. Although the book begins with the basics, it also includes the latest research. It provides all of the concepts necessary to enable a reader equipped with some basic mathematical knowledge to enter the world of machine learning using theoretically well-founded yet easy-to-use kernel algorithms and to understand and apply the powerful algorithms that have been developed over the last few years.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Surface-slant-from-texture discrimination: Effects of slant level and texture type

Rosas, P., Wichmann, F., Wagemans, J.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):300, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
The problem of surface-slant-from-texture was studied psychophysically by measuring the performances of five human subjects in a slant-discrimination task with a number of different types of textures: uniform lattices, randomly displaced lattices, polka dots, Voronoi tessellations, orthogonal sinusoidal plaid patterns, fractal or 1/f noise, “coherent” noise and a “diffusion-based” texture (leopard skin-like). The results show: (1) Improving performance with larger slants for all textures. (2) A “non-symmetrical” performance around a particular slant characterized by a psychometric function that is steeper in the direction of the more slanted orientation. (3) For sufficiently large slants (66 deg) there are no major differences in performance between any of the different textures. (4) For slants at 26, 37 and 53 degrees, however, there are marked differences between the different textures. (5) The observed differences in performance across textures for slants up to 53 degrees are systematic within subjects, and nearly so across them. This allows a rank-order of textures to be formed according to their “helpfulness” — that is, how easy the discrimination task is when a particular texture is mapped on the surface. Polka dots tended to allow the best slant discrimination performance, noise patterns the worst up to the large slant of 66 degrees at which performance was almost independent of the particular texture chosen. Finally, our large number of 2AFC trials (approximately 2800 trials per texture across subjects) and associated tight confidence intervals may enable us to find out about which statistical properties of the textures could be responsible for surface-slant-from-texture estimation, with the ultimate goal of being able to predict observer performance for any arbitrary texture.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Modelling Contrast Transfer in Spatial Vision

Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 2(10):7, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast, the results of which allow different models of contrast processing (e.g. energy versus gain-control models) to be critically assessed (Wichmann & Henning, 1999). Studies of detection and discrimination using pulse train stimuli in noise, on the other hand, make predictions about the number, position and properties of noise sources within the processing stream (Henning, Bird & Wichmann, 2002). Here I report modelling results combining data from both sinusoidal and pulse train experiments in and without noise to arrive at a more tightly constrained model of early spatial vision.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Pulse train detection and discrimination in pink noise

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Journal of Vision, 2(7):229, Second Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), November 2002 (poster)

Abstract
Much of our information about spatial vision comes from detection experiments involving low-contrast stimuli. Contrast discrimination experiments provide one way to explore the visual system's response to stimuli of higher contrast. We explored both detection and contrast discrimination performance with sinusoidal and "pulse-train" (or line) gratings. Both types of grating had a fundamental spatial frequency of 2.09-c/deg but the pulse-train, ideally, contains, in addition to its fundamental component, all the harmonics of the fundamental. Although the 2.09-c/deg pulse-train produced on the display was measured and shown to contain at least 8 harmonics at equal contrast, it was no more detectable than its most detectable component; no benefit from having additional information at the harmonics was measurable. The addition of broadband "pink" noise, designed to equalize the detectability of the components of the pulse train, made it about a factor of four more detectable than any of its components. However, in contrast-discrimination experiments, with an in-phase pedestal or masking grating of the same form and phase as the signal and 15% contrast, the noise did not improve the discrimination performance of the pulse train relative to that of its sinusoidal components. In contrast, a 2.09-c/deg "super train," constructed to have 8 equally detectable harmonics, was a factor of five more detectable than any of its components. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of early vision in particular the implications for possible sources of internal noise.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Sampling Techniques for Kernel Methods

Achlioptas, D., McSherry, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 14 , pages: 335-342, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose randomized techniques for speeding up Kernel Principal Component Analysis on three levels: sampling and quantization of the Gram matrix in training, randomized rounding in evaluating the kernel expansions, and random projections in evaluating the kernel itself. In all three cases, we give sharp bounds on the accuracy of the obtained approximations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Infinite Hidden Markov Model

Beal, MJ., Ghahramani, Z., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 577-584, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov models to have a countably infinite number of hidden states. By using the theory of Dirichlet processes we can implicitly integrate out the infinitely many transition parameters, leaving only three hyperparameters which can be learned from data. These three hyperparameters define a hierarchical Dirichlet process capable of capturing a rich set of transition dynamics. The three hyperparameters control the time scale of the dynamics, the sparsity of the underlying state-transition matrix, and the expected number of distinct hidden states in a finite sequence. In this framework it is also natural to allow the alphabet of emitted symbols to be infinite - consider, for example, symbols being possible words appearing in English text.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A new discriminative kernel from probabilistic models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, Jaakkola and Haussler proposed a method for constructing kernel functions from probabilistic models. Their so called \Fisher kernel" has been combined with discriminative classi ers such as SVM and applied successfully in e.g. DNA and protein analysis. Whereas the Fisher kernel (FK) is calculated from the marginal log-likelihood, we propose the TOP kernel derived from Tangent vectors Of Posterior log-odds. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework on feature extractors from probabilistic models and use it for analyzing the TOP kernel. In experiments our new discriminative TOP kernel compares favorably to the Fisher kernel.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

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PDF Web [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]