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2001


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The psychometric function: I. Fitting, sampling and goodness-of-fit

Wichmann, F., Hill, N.

Perception and Psychophysics, 63 (8), pages: 1293-1313, 2001 (article)

Abstract
The psychometric function relates an observer'sperformance to an independent variable, usually some physical quantity of a stimulus in a psychophysical task. This paper, together with its companion paper (Wichmann & Hill, 2001), describes an integrated approach to (1) fitting psychometric functions, (2) assessing the goodness of fit, and (3) providing confidence intervals for the function'sparameters and other estimates derived from them, for the purposes of hypothesis testing. The present paper deals with the first two topics, describing a constrained maximum-likelihood method of parameter estimation and developing several goodness-of-fit tests. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we deal with two specific difficulties that arise when fitting functions to psychophysical data. First, we note that human observers are prone to stimulus-independent errors (or lapses ). We show that failure to account for this can lead to serious biases in estimates of the psychometric function'sparameters and illustrate how the problem may be overcome. Second, we note that psychophysical data sets are usually rather small by the standards required by most of the commonly applied statistical tests. We demonstrate the potential errors of applying traditional X^2 methods to psychophysical data and advocate use of Monte Carlo resampling techniques that do not rely on asymptotic theory. We have made available the software to implement our methods

PDF [BibTex]

2001

PDF [BibTex]


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On Unsupervised Learning of Mixtures of Markov Sources

Seldin, Y.

Biologische Kybernetik, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, 2001 (diplomathesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Tracking a Small Set of Experts by Mixing Past Posteriors

Bousquet, O., Warmuth, M.

In Proceedings of the 14th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2111, pages: 31-47, Proceedings of the 14th Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we examine on-line learning problems in which the target concept is allowed to change over time. In each trial a master algorithm receives predictions from a large set of $n$ experts. Its goal is to predict almost as well as the best sequence of such experts chosen off-line by partitioning the training sequence into $k+1$ sections and then choosing the best expert for each section. We build on methods developed by Herbster and Warmuth and consider an open problem posed by Freund where the experts in the best partition are from a small pool of size $m$. Since $k>>m$ the best expert shifts back and forth between the experts of the small pool. We propose algorithms that solve this open problem by mixing the past posteriors maintained by the master algorithm. We relate the number of bits needed for encoding the best partition to the loss bounds of the algorithms. Instead of paying $\log n$ for choosing the best expert in each section we first pay $\log {n\choose m}$ bits in the bounds for identifying the pool of $m$ experts and then $\log m$ bits per new section. In the bounds we also pay twice for encoding the boundaries of the sections.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


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Learning and Prediction of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Biological Neurons with Support Vector Machines

Frontzek, T., Lal, TN., Eckmiller, R.

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN'2001), pages: 390-398, Proceedings of the International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks (ICANN'2001), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Based on biological data we examine the ability of Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with gaussian kernels to learn and predict the nonlinear dynamics of single biological neurons. We show that SVMs for regression learn the dynamics of the pyloric dilator neuron of the australian crayfish, and we determine the optimal SVM parameters with regard to the test error. Compared to conventional RBF networks, SVMs learned faster and performed a better iterated one-step-ahead prediction with regard to training and test error. From a biological point of view SVMs are especially better in predicting the most important part of the dynamics, where the membranpotential is driven by superimposed synaptic inputs to the threshold for the oscillatory peak.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Estimating a Kernel Fisher Discriminant in the Presence of Label Noise

Lawrence, N., Schölkopf, B.

In 18th International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 306-313, (Editors: CE Brodley and A Pohoreckyj Danyluk), Morgan Kaufmann , San Fransisco, CA, USA, 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2001 (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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A Generalized Representer Theorem

Schölkopf, B., Herbrich, R., Smola, A.

In Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 2111, (2111):416-426, LNCS, (Editors: D Helmbold and R Williamson), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Annual Conference on Computational Learning Theory (COLT/EuroCOLT), 2001 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Extracting egomotion from optic flow: limits of accuracy and neural matched filters

Dahmen, H-J., Franz, MO., Krapp, HG.

In pages: 143-168, Springer, Berlin, 2001 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Bound on the Leave-One-Out Error for Density Support Estimation using nu-SVMs

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Rayner, P.

University of Cambridge, 2001 (techreport)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The pedestal effect with a pulse train and its constituent sinusoids

Henning, G., Wichmann, F., Bird, C.

Twenty-Sixth Annual Interdisciplinary Conference, 2001 (poster)

Abstract
Curves showing "threshold" contrast for detecting a signal grating as a function of the contrast of a masking grating of the same orientation, spatial frequency, and phase show a characteristic improvement in performance at masker contrasts near the contrast threshold of the unmasked signal. Depending on the percentage of correct responses used to define the threshold, the best performance can be as much as a factor of three better than the unmasked threshold obtained in the absence of any masking grating. The result is called the pedestal effect (sometimes, the dipper function). We used a 2AFC procedure to measure the effect with harmonically related sinusoids ranging from 2 to 16 c/deg - all with maskers of the same orientation, spatial frequency and phase - and with masker contrasts ranging from 0 to 50%. The curves for different spatial frequencies are identical if both the vertical axis (showing the threshold signal contrast) and the horizontal axis (showing the masker contrast) are scaled by the threshold contrast of the signal obtained with no masker. Further, a pulse train with a fundamental frequency of 2 c/deg produces a curve that is indistinguishable from that of a 2-c/deg sinusoid despite the fact that at higher masker contrasts, the pulse train contains at least 8 components all of them equally detectable. The effect of adding 1-D spatial noise is also discussed.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Unsupervised Segmentation and Classification of Mixtures of Markovian Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In The 33rd Symposium on the Interface of Computing Science and Statistics (Interface 2001 - Frontiers in Data Mining and Bioinformatics), pages: 1-15, 33rd Symposium on the Interface of Computing Science and Statistics (Interface - Frontiers in Data Mining and Bioinformatics), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We describe a novel algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources, first presented in [SBT01]. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees [RST96] using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families (results of the [BSMT01] work), we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to signatures of important functional sub-units called domains. Our approach to proteins classification (through the obtained signatures) is shown to have both conceptual and practical advantages over the currently used methods.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The control structure of artificial creatures

Zhou, D., Dai, R.

Artificial Life and Robotics, 5(3), 2001, invited article (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Support Vector Regression for Black-Box System Identification

Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Herbrich, R., Rayner, P., Schölkopf, B.

In 11th IEEE Workshop on Statistical Signal Processing, pages: 341-344, IEEE Signal Processing Society, Piscataway, NY, USA, 11th IEEE Workshop on Statistical Signal Processing, 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper, we demonstrate the use of support vector regression (SVR) techniques for black-box system identification. These methods derive from statistical learning theory, and are of great theoretical and practical interest. We briefly describe the theory underpinning SVR, and compare support vector methods with other approaches using radial basis networks. Finally, we apply SVR to modeling the behaviour of a hydraulic robot arm, and show that SVR improves on previously published results.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Bound on the Leave-One-Out Error for 2-Class Classification using nu-SVMs

Gretton, A., Herbrich, R., Schölkopf, B., Rayner, P.

University of Cambridge, 2001, Updated May 2003 (literature review expanded) (techreport)

Abstract
Three estimates of the leave-one-out error for $nu$-support vector (SV) machine binary classifiers are presented. Two of the estimates are based on the geometrical concept of the {em span}, which was introduced in the context of bounding the leave-one-out error for $C$-SV machine binary classifiers, while the third is based on optimisation over the criterion used to train the $nu$-support vector classifier. It is shown that the estimates presented herein provide informative and efficient approximations of the generalisation behaviour, in both a toy example and benchmark data sets. The proof strategies in the $nu$-SV context are also compared with those used to derive leave-one-out error estimates in the $C$-SV case.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Markovian domain fingerprinting: statistical segmentation of protein sequences

Bejerano, G., Seldin, Y., Margalit, H., Tishby, N.

Bioinformatics, 17(10):927-934, 2001 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Unsupervised Sequence Segmentation by a Mixture of Switching Variable Memory Markov Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In In the proceeding of the 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2001), pages: 513-520, 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a novel information theoretic algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees (Ron et al., 1996) using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The algorithm seems to be self regulated and automatically avoids over segmentation. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families, we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to important functional sub-units called domains.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Kernel Machine Based Learning for Multi-View Face Detection and Pose Estimation

Cheng, Y., Fu, Q., Gu, L., Li, S., Schölkopf, B., Zhang, H.

In Proceedings Computer Vision, 2001, Vol. 2, pages: 674-679, IEEE Computer Society, 8th International Conference on Computer Vision (ICCV), 2001 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Some kernels for structured data

Bartlett, P., Schölkopf, B.

Biowulf Technologies, 2001 (techreport)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Modeling the Dynamics of Individual Neurons of the Stomatogastric Networks with Support Vector Machines

Frontzek, T., Gutzen, C., Lal, TN., Heinzel, H-G., Eckmiller, R., Böhm, H.

Abstract Proceedings of the 6th International Congress of Neuroethology (ICN'2001) Bonn, abstract 404, 2001 (poster)

Abstract
In small rhythmic active networks timing of individual neurons is crucial for generating different spatial-temporal motor patterns. Switching of one neuron between different rhythms can cause transition between behavioral modes. In order to understand the dynamics of rhythmically active neurons we analyzed the oscillatory membranpotential of a pacemaker neuron and used different neural network models to predict dynamics of its time series. In a first step we have trained conventional RBF networks and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) using gaussian kernels with intracellulary recordings of the pyloric dilatator neuron in the Australian crayfish, Cherax destructor albidus. As a rule SVMs were able to learn the nonlinear dynamics of pyloric neurons faster (e.g. 15s) than RBF networks (e.g. 309s) under the same hardware conditions. After training SVMs performed a better iterated one-step-ahead prediction of time series in the pyloric dilatator neuron with regard to test error and error sum. The test error decreased with increasing number of support vectors. The best SVM used 196 support vectors and produced a test error of 0.04622 as opposed to the best RBF with 0.07295 using 26 RBF-neurons. In pacemaker neuron PD the timepoint at which the membranpotential will cross threshold for generation of its oscillatory peak is most important for determination of the test error. Interestingly SVMs are especially better in predicting this important part of the membranpotential which is superimposed by various synaptic inputs, which drive the membranpotential to its threshold.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Support Vector Machines: Theorie und Anwendung auf Prädiktion epileptischer Anfälle auf der Basis von EEG-Daten

Lal, TN.

Biologische Kybernetik, Institut für Angewandte Mathematik, Universität Bonn, 2001, Advised by Prof. Dr. S. Albeverio (diplomathesis)

ZIP [BibTex]

ZIP [BibTex]


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Inference Principles and Model Selection

Buhmann, J., Schölkopf, B.

(01301), Dagstuhl Seminar, 2001 (techreport)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]

1999


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Some Aspects of Modelling Human Spatial Vision: Contrast Discrimination

Wichmann, F.

University of Oxford, University of Oxford, October 1999 (phdthesis)

[BibTex]

1999

[BibTex]


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Engineering Support Vector Machine Kernels That Recognize Translation Initiation Sites in DNA

Zien, A., Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Lemmen, C., Smola, A., Lengauer, T., Müller, K.

In German Conference on Bioinformatics (GCB 1999), October 1999 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In order to extract protein sequences from nucleotide sequences, it is an important step to recognize points from which regions encoding pro­ teins start, the so­called translation initiation sites (TIS). This can be modeled as a classification prob­ lem. We demonstrate the power of support vector machines (SVMs) for this task, and show how to suc­ cessfully incorporate biological prior knowledge by engineering an appropriate kernel function.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Unexpected and anticipated pain: identification of specific brain activations by correlation with reference functions derived form conditioning theory

Ploghaus, A., Clare, S., Wichmann, F., Tracey, I.

29, 29th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience), October 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Lernen mit Kernen: Support-Vektor-Methoden zur Analyse hochdimensionaler Daten

Schölkopf, B., Müller, K., Smola, A.

Informatik - Forschung und Entwicklung, 14(3):154-163, September 1999 (article)

Abstract
We describe recent developments and results of statistical learning theory. In the framework of learning from examples, two factors control generalization ability: explaining the training data by a learning machine of a suitable complexity. We describe kernel algorithms in feature spaces as elegant and efficient methods of realizing such machines. Examples thereof are Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Kernel PCA (Principal Component Analysis). More important than any individual example of a kernel algorithm, however, is the insight that any algorithm that can be cast in terms of dot products can be generalized to a nonlinear setting using kernels. Finally, we illustrate the significance of kernel algorithms by briefly describing industrial and academic applications, including ones where we obtained benchmark record results.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Input space versus feature space in kernel-based methods

Schölkopf, B., Mika, S., Burges, C., Knirsch, P., Müller, K., Rätsch, G., Smola, A.

IEEE Transactions On Neural Networks, 10(5):1000-1017, September 1999 (article)

Abstract
This paper collects some ideas targeted at advancing our understanding of the feature spaces associated with support vector (SV) kernel functions. We first discuss the geometry of feature space. In particular, we review what is known about the shape of the image of input space under the feature space map, and how this influences the capacity of SV methods. Following this, we describe how the metric governing the intrinsic geometry of the mapped surface can be computed in terms of the kernel, using the example of the class of inhomogeneous polynomial kernels, which are often used in SV pattern recognition. We then discuss the connection between feature space and input space by dealing with the question of how one can, given some vector in feature space, find a preimage (exact or approximate) in input space. We describe algorithms to tackle this issue, and show their utility in two applications of kernel methods. First, we use it to reduce the computational complexity of SV decision functions; second, we combine it with the kernel PCA algorithm, thereby constructing a nonlinear statistical denoising technique which is shown to perform well on real-world data.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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p73 and p63 are homotetramers capable of weak heterotypic interactions with each other but not with p53.

Davison, T., Vagner, C., Kaghad, M., Ayed, A., Caput, D., CH, ..

Journal of Biological Chemistry, 274(26):18709-18714, June 1999 (article)

Abstract
Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic alterations found in human cancers. Recent identification of two human homologues of p53 has raised the prospect of functional interactions between family members via a conserved oligomerization domain. Here we report in vitro and in vivo analysis of homo- and hetero-oligomerization of p53 and its homologues, p63 and p73. The oligomerization domains of p63 and p73 can independently fold into stable homotetramers, as previously observed for p53. However, the oligomerization domain of p53 does not associate with that of either p73 or p63, even when p53 is in 15-fold excess. On the other hand, the oligomerization domains of p63 and p73 are able to weakly associate with one another in vitro. In vivo co-transfection assays of the ability of p53 and its homologues to activate reporter genes showed that a DNA-binding mutant of p53 was not able to act in a dominant negative manner over wild-type p73 or p63 but that a p73 mutant could inhibit the activity of wild-type p63. These data suggest that mutant p53 in cancer cells will not interact with endogenous or exogenous p63 or p73 via their respective oligomerization domains. It also establishes that the multiple isoforms of p63 as well as those of p73 are capable of interacting via their common oligomerization domain.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Shrinking the tube: a new support vector regression algorithm

Schölkopf, B., Bartlett, P., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 11, pages: 330-336 , (Editors: MS Kearns and SA Solla and DA Cohn), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 12th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1999 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Semiparametric support vector and linear programming machines

Smola, A., Friess, T., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 11, pages: 585-591 , (Editors: MS Kearns and SA Solla and DA Cohn), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Twelfth Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1999 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Semiparametric models are useful tools in the case where domain knowledge exists about the function to be estimated or emphasis is put onto understandability of the model. We extend two learning algorithms - Support Vector machines and Linear Programming machines to this case and give experimental results for SV machines.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel PCA and De-noising in feature spaces

Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K., Scholz, M., Rätsch, G.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 11, pages: 536-542 , (Editors: MS Kearns and SA Solla and DA Cohn), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 12th Annual Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NIPS), June 1999 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Kernel PCA as a nonlinear feature extractor has proven powerful as a preprocessing step for classification algorithms. But it can also be considered as a natural generalization of linear principal component analysis. This gives rise to the question how to use nonlinear features for data compression, reconstruction, and de-noising, applications common in linear PCA. This is a nontrivial task, as the results provided by kernel PCA live in some high dimensional feature space and need not have pre-images in input space. This work presents ideas for finding approximate pre-images, focusing on Gaussian kernels, and shows experimental results using these pre-images in data reconstruction and de-noising on toy examples as well as on real world data.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Kernel principal component analysis.

Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Müller, K.

In Advances in Kernel Methods—Support Vector Learning, pages: 327-352, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Estimating the support of a high-dimensional distribution

Schölkopf, B., Platt, J., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

(MSR-TR-99-87), Microsoft Research, 1999 (techreport)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Single-class Support Vector Machines

Schölkopf, B., Williamson, R., Smola, A., Shawe-Taylor, J.

Dagstuhl-Seminar on Unsupervised Learning, pages: 19-20, (Editors: J. Buhmann, W. Maass, H. Ritter and N. Tishby), 1999 (poster)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Spatial Learning and Localization in Animals: A Computational Model and Its Implications for Mobile Robots

Balakrishnan, K., Bousquet, O., Honavar, V.

Adaptive Behavior, 7(2):173-216, 1999 (article)

[BibTex]


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SVMs for Histogram Based Image Classification

Chapelle, O., Haffner, P., Vapnik, V.

IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, (9), 1999 (article)

Abstract
Traditional classification approaches generalize poorly on image classification tasks, because of the high dimensionality of the feature space. This paper shows that Support Vector Machines (SVM) can generalize well on difficult image classification problems where the only features are high dimensional histograms. Heavy-tailed RBF kernels of the form $K(mathbf{x},mathbf{y})=e^{-rhosum_i |x_i^a-y_i^a|^{b}}$ with $aleq 1$ and $b leq 2$ are evaluated on the classification of images extracted from the Corel Stock Photo Collection and shown to far outperform traditional polynomial or Gaussian RBF kernels. Moreover, we observed that a simple remapping of the input $x_i rightarrow x_i^a$ improves the performance of linear SVMs to such an extend that it makes them, for this problem, a valid alternative to RBF kernels.

GZIP [BibTex]

GZIP [BibTex]


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Classifying LEP data with support vector algorithms.

Vannerem, P., Müller, K., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B., Söldner-Rembold, S.

In Artificial Intelligence in High Energy Nuclear Physics 99, Artificial Intelligence in High Energy Nuclear Physics 99, 1999 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Generalization Bounds via Eigenvalues of the Gram matrix

Schölkopf, B., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

(99-035), NeuroCOLT, 1999 (techreport)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Pedestal effects with periodic pulse trains

Henning, G., Wichmann, F.

Perception, 28, pages: S137, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
It is important to know for theoretical reasons how performance varies with stimulus contrast. But, for objects on CRT displays, retinal contrast is limited by the linear range of the display and the modulation transfer function of the eye. For example, with an 8 c/deg sinusoidal grating at 90% contrast, the contrast of the retinal image is barely 45%; more retinal contrast is required, however, to discriminate among theories of contrast discrimination (Wichmann, Henning and Ploghaus, 1998). The stimulus with the greatest contrast at any spatial-frequency component is a periodic pulse train which has 200% contrast at every harmonic. Such a waveform cannot, of course, be produced; the best we can do with our Mitsubishi display provides a contrast of 150% at an 8-c/deg fundamental thus producing a retinal image with about 75% contrast. The penalty of using this stimulus is that the 2nd harmonic of the retinal image also has high contrast (with an emmetropic eye, more than 60% of the contrast of the 8-c/deg fundamental ) and the mean luminance is not large (24.5 cd/m2 on our display). We have used standard 2-AFC experiments to measure the detectability of an 8-c/deg pulse train against the background of an identical pulse train of different contrasts. An unusually large improvement in detetectability was measured, the pedestal effect or "dipper," and the dipper was unusually broad. The implications of these results will be discussed.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Apprentissage Automatique et Simplicite

Bousquet, O.

Biologische Kybernetik, 1999, In french (diplomathesis)

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Classification on proximity data with LP-machines

Graepel, T., Herbrich, R., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A., Bartlett, P., Müller, K., Obermayer, K., Williamson, R.

In Artificial Neural Networks, 1999. ICANN 99, 470, pages: 304-309, Conference Publications , IEEE, 9th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1999 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel-dependent support vector error bounds

Schölkopf, B., Shawe-Taylor, J., Smola, A., Williamson, R.

In Artificial Neural Networks, 1999. ICANN 99, 470, pages: 103-108 , Conference Publications , IEEE, 9th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1999 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Linear programs for automatic accuracy control in regression

Smola, A., Schölkopf, B., Rätsch, G.

In Artificial Neural Networks, 1999. ICANN 99, 470, pages: 575-580 , Conference Publications , IEEE, 9th International Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, 1999 (inproceedings)

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Regularized principal manifolds.

Smola, A., Williamson, R., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 1572, 1572, pages: 214-229 , Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, (Editors: P Fischer and H-U Simon), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Computational Learning Theory: 4th European Conference, 1999 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Entropy numbers, operators and support vector kernels.

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 1572, 1572, pages: 285-299, Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, (Editors: P Fischer and H-U Simon), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Computational Learning Theory: 4th European Conference, 1999 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Sparse kernel feature analysis

Smola, A., Mangasarian, O., Schölkopf, B.

(99-04), Data Mining Institute, 1999, 24th Annual Conference of Gesellschaft f{\"u}r Klassifikation, University of Passau (techreport)

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


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Machine Learning and Language Acquisition: A Model of Child’s Learning of Turkish Morphophonology

Altun, Y.

Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey, 1999 (mastersthesis)

[BibTex]


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Is the Hippocampus a Kalman Filter?

Bousquet, O., Balakrishnan, K., Honavar, V.

In Proceedings of the Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 3, pages: 619-630, Proceedings of the Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing, 1999 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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A Comparison of Artificial Neural Networks and Cluster Analysis for Typing Biometrics Authentication

Maisuria, K., Ong, CS., Lai, .

In unknown, pages: 9999-9999, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, 1999 (inproceedings)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Implications of the pedestal effect for models of contrast-processing and gain-control

Wichmann, F., Henning, G.

OSA Conference Program, pages: 62, 1999 (poster)

Abstract
Understanding contrast processing is essential for understanding spatial vision. Pedestal contrast systematically affects slopes of functions relating 2-AFC contrast discrimination performance to pedestal contrast. The slopes provide crucial information because only full sets of data allow discrimination among contrast-processing and gain-control models. Issues surrounding Weber's law will also be discussed.

[BibTex]


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Entropy numbers, operators and support vector kernels.

Williamson, R., Smola, A., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning, pages: 127-144, (Editors: B Schölkopf and CJC Burges and AJ Smola), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Advances in Kernel Methods - Support Vector Learning

Schölkopf, B., Burges, C., Smola, A.

MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1999 (book)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]