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2006


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Phase noise and the classification of natural images

Wichmann, F., Braun, D., Gegenfurtner, K.

Vision Research, 46(8-9):1520-1529, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
We measured the effect of global phase manipulations on a rapid animal categorization task. The Fourier spectra of our images of natural scenes were manipulated by adding zero-mean random phase noise at all spatial frequencies. The phase noise was the independent variable, uniformly and symmetrically distributed between 0 degree and ±180 degrees. Subjects were remarkably resistant to phase noise. Even with ±120 degree phase noise subjects were still performing at 75% correct. The high resistance of the subjects’ animal categorization rate to phase noise suggests that the visual system is highly robust to such random image changes. The proportion of correct answers closely followed the correlation between original and the phase noise-distorted images. Animal detection rate was higher when the same task was performed with contrast reduced versions of the same natural images, at contrasts where the contrast reduction mimicked that resulting from our phase randomization. Since the subjects’ categorization rate was better in the contrast experiment, reduction of local contrast alone cannot explain the performance in the phase noise experiment. This result obtained with natural images differs from those obtained for simple sinusoidal stimuli were performance changes due to phase changes are attributed to local contrast changes only. Thus the global phasechange accompanying disruption of image structure such as edges and object boundaries at different spatial scales reduces object classification over and above the performance deficit resulting from reducing contrast. Additional colour information improves the categorization performance by 2 %.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

2006

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Functional census of mutation sequence spaces: The example of p53 cancer rescue mutants

Danziger, S., Swamidass, S., Zeng, J., Dearth, L., Lu, Q., Cheng, J., Cheng, J., Hoang, V., Saigo, H., Luo, R., Baldi, P., Brachmann, R., Lathrop, R.

IEEE Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, 3(2):114-125, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
Many biomedical problems relate to mutant functional properties across a sequence space of interest, e.g., flu, cancer, and HIV. Detailed knowledge of mutant properties and function improves medical treatment and prevention. A functional census of p53 cancer rescue mutants would aid the search for cancer treatments from p53 mutant rescue. We devised a general methodology for conducting a functional census of a mutation sequence space by choosing informative mutants early. The methodology was tested in a double-blind predictive test on the functional rescue property of 71 novel putative p53 cancer rescue mutants iteratively predicted in sets of three (24 iterations). The first double-blind 15-point moving accuracy was 47 percent and the last was 86 percent; r = 0.01 before an epiphanic 16th iteration and r = 0.92 afterward. Useful mutants were chosen early (overall r = 0.80). Code and data are freely available (http://www.igb.uci.edu/research/research.html, corresponding authors: R.H.L. for computation and R.K.B. for biology).

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A Direct Method for Building Sparse Kernel Learning Algorithms

Wu, M., Schölkopf, B., BakIr, G.

Journal of Machine Learning Research, 7, pages: 603-624, April 2006 (article)

Abstract
Many Kernel Learning Algorithms(KLA), including Support Vector Machine (SVM), result in a Kernel Machine (KM), such as a kernel classifier, whose key component is a weight vector in a feature space implicitly introduced by a positive definite kernel function. This weight vector is usually obtained by solving a convex optimization problem. Based on this fact we present a direct method to build Sparse Kernel Learning Algorithms (SKLA) by adding one more constraint to the original convex optimization problem, such that the sparseness of the resulting KM is explicitly controlled while at the same time the performance of the resulting KM can be kept as high as possible. A gradient based approach is provided to solve this modified optimization problem. Applying this method to the SVM results in a concrete algorithm for building Sparse Large Margin Classifiers (SLMC). Further analysis of the SLMC algorithm indicates that it essentially finds a discriminating subspace that can be spanned by a small number of vectors, and in this subspace, the different classes of data are linearly well separated. Experimental results over several classification benchmarks demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


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Estimating Predictive Variances with Kernel Ridge Regression

Cawley, G., Talbot, N., Chapelle, O.

In MLCW 2005, pages: 56-77, (Editors: Quinonero-Candela, J. , I. Dagan, B. Magnini, F. D‘Alché-Buc), Springer, Berlin, Germany, First PASCAL Machine Learning Challenges Workshop, April 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In many regression tasks, in addition to an accurate estimate of the conditional mean of the target distribution, an indication of the predictive uncertainty is also required. There are two principal sources of this uncertainty: the noise process contaminating the data and the uncertainty in estimating the model parameters based on a limited sample of training data. Both of them can be summarised in the predictive variance which can then be used to give confidence intervals. In this paper, we present various schemes for providing predictive variances for kernel ridge regression, especially in the case of a heteroscedastic regression, where the variance of the noise process contaminating the data is a smooth function of the explanatory variables. The use of leave-one-out cross-validation is shown to eliminate the bias inherent in estimates of the predictive variance. Results obtained on all three regression tasks comprising the predictive uncertainty challenge demonstrate the value of this approach.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel extrapolation

Vishwanathan, SVN., Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Smola, AJ.

Neurocomputing, 69(7-9):721-729, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present a framework for efficient extrapolation of reduced rank approximations, graph kernels, and locally linear embeddings (LLE) to unseen data. We also present a principled method to combine many of these kernels and then extrapolate them. Central to our method is a theorem for matrix approximation, and an extension of the representer theorem to handle multiple joint regularization constraints. Experiments in protein classification demonstrate the feasibility of our approach.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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ICA by PCA Approach: Relating Higher-Order Statistics to Second-Order Moments

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation, pages: 311-318, (Editors: J P Rosca and D Erdogmus and J C Príncipe and S Haykin), Springer, 6th International Conference on Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation (ICA), March 2006, Series: Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3889 (inproceedings)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Statistical Properties of Kernel Principal Component Analysis

Blanchard, G., Bousquet, O., Zwald, L.

Machine Learning, 66(2-3):259-294, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We study the properties of the eigenvalues of Gram matrices in a non-asymptotic setting. Using local Rademacher averages, we provide data-dependent and tight bounds for their convergence towards eigenvalues of the corresponding kernel operator. We perform these computations in a functional analytic framework which allows to deal implicitly with reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces of infinite dimension. This can have applications to various kernel algorithms, such as Support Vector Machines (SVM). We focus on Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and, using such techniques, we obtain sharp excess risk bounds for the reconstruction error. In these bounds, the dependence on the decay of the spectrum and on the closeness of successive eigenvalues is made explicit.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Network-based de-noising improves prediction from microarray data

Kato, T., Murata, Y., Miura, K., Asai, K., Horton, P., Tsuda, K., Fujibuchi, W.

BMC Bioinformatics, 7(Suppl. 1):S4-S4, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
Prediction of human cell response to anti-cancer drugs (compounds) from microarray data is a challenging problem, due to the noise properties of microarrays as well as the high variance of living cell responses to drugs. Hence there is a strong need for more practical and robust methods than standard methods for real-value prediction. We devised an extended version of the off-subspace noise-reduction (de-noising) method to incorporate heterogeneous network data such as sequence similarity or protein-protein interactions into a single framework. Using that method, we first de-noise the gene expression data for training and test data and also the drug-response data for training data. Then we predict the unknown responses of each drug from the de-noised input data. For ascertaining whether de-noising improves prediction or not, we carry out 12-fold cross-validation for assessment of the prediction performance. We use the Pearson‘s correlation coefficient between the true and predicted respon se values as the prediction performance. De-noising improves the prediction performance for 65% of drugs. Furthermore, we found that this noise reduction method is robust and effective even when a large amount of artificial noise is added to the input data. We found that our extended off-subspace noise-reduction method combining heterogeneous biological data is successful and quite useful to improve prediction of human cell cancer drug responses from microarray data.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Machine Learning Methods For Estimating Operator Equations

Steinke, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 14th IFAC Symposium on System Identification (SYSID 2006), pages: 6, (Editors: B Ninness and H Hjalmarsson), Elsevier, Oxford, United Kingdom, 14th IFAC Symposium on System Identification (SYSID), March 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We consider the problem of fitting a linear operator induced equation to point sampled data. In order to do so we systematically exploit the duality between minimizing a regularization functional derived from an operator and kernel regression methods. Standard machine learning model selection algorithms can then be interpreted as a search of the equation best fitting given data points. For many kernels this operator induced equation is a linear differential equation. Thus, we link a continuous-time system identification task with common machine learning methods. The presented link opens up a wide variety of methods to be applied to this system identification problem. In a series of experiments we demonstrate an example algorithm working on non-uniformly spaced data, giving special focus to the problem of identifying one system from multiple data recordings.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Data mining problems and solutions for response modeling in CRM

Cho, S., Shin, H., Yu, E., Ha, K., MacLachlan, D.

Entrue Journal of Information Technology, 5(1):55-64, March 2006 (article)

Abstract
We present three data mining problems that are often encountered in building a response model. They are robust modeling, variable selection and data selection. Respective algorithmic solutions are given. They are bagging based ensemble, genetic algorithm based wrapper approach and nearest neighbor-based data selection in that order. A real world data set from Direct Marketing Educational Foundation, or DMEF4, is used to show their effectiveness. Proposed methods were found to solve the problems in a practical way.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Implicit Volterra and Wiener Series for Higher-Order Image Analysis

Franz, M., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Data Analysis: Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of The Gesellschaft für Klassifikation, 30, pages: 1, March 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The computation of classical higher-order statistics such as higher-order moments or spectra is difficult for images due to the huge number of terms to be estimated and interpreted. We propose an alternative approach in which multiplicative pixel interactions are described by a series of Wiener functionals. Since the functionals are estimated implicitly via polynomial kernels, the combinatorial explosion associated with the classical higher-order statistics is avoided. In addition, the kernel framework allows for estimating infinite series expansions and for the regularized estimation of the Wiener series. First results show that image structures such as lines or corners can be predicted correctly, and that pixel interactions up to the order of five play an important role in natural images.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Model-based Design Analysis and Yield Optimization

Pfingsten, T., Herrmann, D., Rasmussen, C.

IEEE Transactions on Semiconductor Manufacturing, 19(4):475-486, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Fluctuations are inherent to any fabrication process. Integrated circuits and micro-electro-mechanical systems are particularly affected by these variations, and due to high quality requirements the effect on the devices’ performance has to be understood quantitatively. In recent years it has become possible to model the performance of such complex systems on the basis of design specifications, and model-based Sensitivity Analysis has made its way into industrial engineering. We show how an efficient Bayesian approach, using a Gaussian process prior, can replace the commonly used brute-force Monte Carlo scheme, making it possible to apply the analysis to computationally costly models. We introduce a number of global, statistically justified sensitivity measures for design analysis and optimization. Two models of integrated systems serve us as case studies to introduce the analysis and to assess its convergence properties. We show that the Bayesian Monte Carlo scheme can save costly simulation runs and can ensure a reliable accuracy of the analysis.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Prenatal development of ocular dominance and orientation maps in a self-organizing model of V1

Jegelka, S., Bednar, J., Miikkulainen, R.

Neurocomputing, 69(10-12):1291-1296, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
How orientation and ocular-dominance (OD) maps develop before visual experience begins is controversial. Possible influences include molecular signals and spontaneous activity, but their contributions remain unclear. This paper presents LISSOM simulations suggesting that previsual spontaneous activity alone is sufficient for realistic OR and OD maps to develop. Individual maps develop robustly with various previsual patterns, and are aided by background noise. However, joint OR/OD maps depend crucially on how correlated the patterns are between eyes, even over brief initial periods. Therefore, future biological experiments should account for multiple activity sources, and should measure map interactions rather than maps of single features.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Weighting of experimental evidence in macromolecular structure determination

Habeck, M., Rieping, W., Nilges, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(6):1756-1761, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
The determination of macromolecular structures requires weighting of experimental evidence relative to prior physical information. Although it can critically affect the quality of the calculated structures, experimental data are routinely weighted on an empirical basis. At present, cross-validation is the most rigorous method to determine the best weight. We describe a general method to adaptively weight experimental data in the course of structure calculation. It is further shown that the necessity to define weights for the data can be completely alleviated. We demonstrate the method on a structure calculation from NMR data and find that the resulting structures are optimal in terms of accuracy and structural quality. Our method is devoid of the bias imposed by an empirical choice of the weight and has some advantages over estimating the weight by cross-validation.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Subspace identification through blind source separation

Grosse-Wentrup, M., Buss, M.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(2):100-103, February 2006 (article)

Abstract
Given a linear and instantaneous mixture model, we prove that for blind source separation (BSS) algorithms based on mutual information, only sources with non-Gaussian distribution are consistently reconstructed independent of initial conditions. This allows the identification of non-Gaussian sources and consequently the identification of signal and noise subspaces through BSS. The results are illustrated with a simple example, and the implications for a variety of signal processing applications, such as denoising and model identification, are discussed.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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Classification of Faces in Man and Machine

Graf, A., Wichmann, F., Bülthoff, H., Schölkopf, B.

Neural Computation, 18(1):143-165, January 2006 (article)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Class prediction from time series gene expression profiles using dynamical systems kernels

Borgwardt, KM., Vishwanathan, SVN., Kriegel, H-P.

In pages: 547-558, (Editors: Altman, R.B. A.K. Dunker, L. Hunter, T. Murray, T.E. Klein), World Scientific, Singapore, Pacific Symposium on Biocomputing (PSB), January 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a kernel-based approach to the classification of time series of gene expression profiles. Our method takes into account the dynamic evolution over time as well as the temporal characteristics of the data. More specifically, we model the evolution of the gene expression profiles as a Linear Time Invariant (LTI) dynamical system and estimate its model parameters. A kernel on dynamical systems is then used to classify these time series. We successfully test our approach on a published dataset to predict response to drug therapy in Multiple Sclerosis patients. For pharmacogenomics, our method offers a huge potential for advanced computational tools in disease diagnosis, and disease and drug therapy outcome prognosis.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Causal Inference by Choosing Graphs with Most Plausible Markov Kernels

Sun, X., Janzing, D., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 9th International Symposium on Artificial Intelligence and Mathematics, pages: 1-11, ISAIM, January 2006 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose a new inference rule for estimating causal structure that underlies the observed statistical dependencies among n random variables. Our method is based on comparing the conditional distributions of variables given their direct causes (the so-called Markov kernels") for all hypothetical causal directions and choosing the most plausible one. We consider those Markov kernels most plausible, which maximize the (conditional) entropies constrained by their observed first moment (expectation) and second moments (variance and covariance with its direct causes) based on their given domain. In this paper, we discuss our inference rule for causal relationships between two variables in detail, apply it to a real-world temperature data set with known causality and show that our method provides a correct result for the example.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Dimension Reduction as a Deflation Method in ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 13(1):45-48, 2006 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Extensions of ICA for Causality Discovery in the Hong Kong Stock Market

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Neural Information Processing, 13th International Conference, ICONIP 2006, pages: 400-409, (Editors: I King and J Wang and L Chan and D L Wang), Springer, 13th International Conference on Neural Information Processing (ICONIP), 2006, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2006, Volume 4234/2006 (inproceedings)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Enhancement of source independence for blind source separation

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation, LNCS 3889, pages: 731-738, (Editors: J. Rosca and D. Erdogmus and JC Príncipe und S. Haykin), Springer, Berlin, Germany, 6th International Conference on Independent Component Analysis and Blind Signal Separation (ICA), 2006, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2006, Volume 3889/2006 (inproceedings)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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ICA with Sparse Connections

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated Learning – IDEAL 2006, pages: 530-537, (Editors: E Corchado and H Yin and V Botti und Colin Fyfe), Springer, 7th International Conference on Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated Learning (IDEAL), 2006, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 2006, Volume 4224/2006 (inproceedings)

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Symbol Recognition with Kernel Density Matching

Zhang, W., Wenyin, L., Zhang, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 28(12):2020-2024, 2006 (article)

Abstract
We propose a novel approach to similarity assessment for graphic symbols. Symbols are represented as 2D kernel densities and their similarity is measured by the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Symbol orientation is found by gradient-based angle searching or independent component analysis. Experimental results show the outstanding performance of this approach in various situations.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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An adaptive method for subband decomposition ICA

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Neural Computation, 18(1):191-223, 2006 (article)

Abstract
Subband decomposition ICA (SDICA), an extension of ICA, assumes that each source is represented as the sum of some independent subcomponents and dependent subcomponents, which have different frequency bands. In this article, we first investigate the feasibility of separating the SDICA mixture in an adaptive manner. Second, we develop an adaptive method for SDICA, namely band-selective ICA (BS-ICA), which finds the mixing matrix and the estimate of the source independent subcomponents. This method is based on the minimization of the mutual information between outputs. Some practical issues are discussed. For better applicability, a scheme to avoid the high-dimensional score function difference is given. Third, we investigate one form of the overcomplete ICA problems with sources having specific frequency characteristics, which BS-ICA can also be used to solve. Experimental results illustrate the success of the proposed method for solving both SDICA and the over-complete ICA problems.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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How to choose the covariance for Gaussian process regression independently of the basis

Franz, M., Gehler, P.

In Proceedings of the Workshop Gaussian Processes in Practice, Workshop Gaussian Processes in Practice (GPIP), 2006 (inproceedings)

pdf [BibTex]

pdf [BibTex]


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Learning operational space control

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In Robotics: Science and Systems II (RSS 2006), pages: 255-262, (Editors: Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Stefan Schaal and Wolfram Burgard and Dieter Fox), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, RSS , 2006, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
While operational space control is of essential importance for robotics and well-understood from an analytical point of view, it can be prohibitively hard to achieve accurate control in face of modeling errors, which are inevitable in complex robots, e.g., humanoid robots. In such cases, learning control methods can offer an interesting alternative to analytical control algorithms. However, the resulting learning problem is ill-defined as it requires to learn an inverse mapping of a usually redundant system, which is well known to suffer from the property of non-covexity of the solution space, i.e., the learning system could generate motor commands that try to steer the robot into physically impossible configurations. A first important insight for this paper is that, nevertheless, a physically correct solution to the inverse problem does exits when learning of the inverse map is performed in a suitable piecewise linear way. The second crucial component for our work is based on a recent insight that many operational space controllers can be understood in terms of a constraint optimal control problem. The cost function associated with this optimal control problem allows us to formulate a learning algorithm that automatically synthesizes a globally consistent desired resolution of redundancy while learning the operational space controller. From the view of machine learning, the learning problem corresponds to a reinforcement learning problem that maximizes an immediate reward and that employs an expectation-maximization policy search algorithm. Evaluations on a three degrees of freedom robot arm illustrate the feasability of our suggested approach.

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Reinforcement Learning for Parameterized Motor Primitives

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 2006 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, pages: 73-80, IJCNN, 2006, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
One of the major challenges in both action generation for robotics and in the understanding of human motor control is to learn the "building blocks of movement generation", called motor primitives. Motor primitives, as used in this paper, are parameterized control policies such as splines or nonlinear differential equations with desired attractor properties. While a lot of progress has been made in teaching parameterized motor primitives using supervised or imitation learning, the self-improvement by interaction of the system with the environment remains a challenging problem. In this paper, we evaluate different reinforcement learning approaches for improving the performance of parameterized motor primitives. For pursuing this goal, we highlight the difficulties with current reinforcement learning methods, and outline both established and novel algorithms for the gradient-based improvement of parameterized policies. We compare these algorithms in the context of motor primitive learning, and show that our most modern algorithm, the Episodic Natural Actor-Critic outperforms previous algorithms by at least an order of magnitude. We demonstrate the efficiency of this reinforcement learning method in the application of learning to hit a baseball with an anthropomorphic robot arm.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


The rate adapting poisson model for information retrieval and object recognition
The rate adapting poisson model for information retrieval and object recognition

Gehler, P. V., Holub, A. D., Welling, M.

In Proceedings of the 23rd international conference on Machine learning, pages: 337-344, ICML ’06, ACM, New York, NY, USA, 2006 (inproceedings)

project page pdf DOI [BibTex]

project page pdf DOI [BibTex]


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Policy gradient methods for robotics

Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Intelligent Robotics Systems, pages: 2219-2225, IROS, 2006, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
The aquisition and improvement of motor skills and control policies for robotics from trial and error is of essential importance if robots should ever leave precisely pre-structured environments. However, to date only few existing reinforcement learning methods have been scaled into the domains of highdimensional robots such as manipulator, legged or humanoid robots. Policy gradient methods remain one of the few exceptions and have found a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the application of such methods is not without peril if done in an uninformed manner. In this paper, we give an overview on learning with policy gradient methods for robotics with a strong focus on recent advances in the field. We outline previous applications to robotics and show how the most recently developed methods can significantly improve learning performance. Finally, we evaluate our most promising algorithm in the application of hitting a baseball with an anthropomorphic arm.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2002


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Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

2002

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


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Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


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A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


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Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Sampling Techniques for Kernel Methods

Achlioptas, D., McSherry, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 14 , pages: 335-342, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose randomized techniques for speeding up Kernel Principal Component Analysis on three levels: sampling and quantization of the Gram matrix in training, randomized rounding in evaluating the kernel expansions, and random projections in evaluating the kernel itself. In all three cases, we give sharp bounds on the accuracy of the obtained approximations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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The Infinite Hidden Markov Model

Beal, MJ., Ghahramani, Z., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 577-584, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov models to have a countably infinite number of hidden states. By using the theory of Dirichlet processes we can implicitly integrate out the infinitely many transition parameters, leaving only three hyperparameters which can be learned from data. These three hyperparameters define a hierarchical Dirichlet process capable of capturing a rich set of transition dynamics. The three hyperparameters control the time scale of the dynamics, the sparsity of the underlying state-transition matrix, and the expected number of distinct hidden states in a finite sequence. In this framework it is also natural to allow the alphabet of emitted symbols to be infinite - consider, for example, symbols being possible words appearing in English text.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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A new discriminative kernel from probabilistic models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, Jaakkola and Haussler proposed a method for constructing kernel functions from probabilistic models. Their so called \Fisher kernel" has been combined with discriminative classi ers such as SVM and applied successfully in e.g. DNA and protein analysis. Whereas the Fisher kernel (FK) is calculated from the marginal log-likelihood, we propose the TOP kernel derived from Tangent vectors Of Posterior log-odds. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework on feature extractors from probabilistic models and use it for analyzing the TOP kernel. In experiments our new discriminative TOP kernel compares favorably to the Fisher kernel.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Kernel feature spaces and nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 761-768, (Editors: Dietterich, T. G., S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In kernel based learning the data is mapped to a kernel feature space of a dimension that corresponds to the number of training data points. In practice, however, the data forms a smaller submanifold in feature space, a fact that has been used e.g. by reduced set techniques for SVMs. We propose a new mathematical construction that permits to adapt to the intrinsic dimension and to find an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. In doing so, computations get much simpler and more important our theoretical framework allows to derive elegant kernelized blind source separation (BSS) algorithms for arbitrary invertible nonlinear mixings. Experiments demonstrate the good performance and high computational efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for the problem of nonlinear BSS.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


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Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


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Algorithms for Learning Function Distinguishable Regular Languages

Fernau, H., Radl, A.

In Joint IAPR International Workshop on Structural, Syntactic, and Statistical Pattern Recognition, pages: 64-73, (Editors: Caelli, T. , A. Amin, R. P.W. Duin, M. Kamel, D. de Ridder), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Joint IAPR International Workshop on Structural, Syntactic, and Statistical Pattern Recognition, August 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Function distinguishable languages were introduced as a new methodology of defining characterizable subclasses of the regular languages which are learnable from text. Here, we give details on the implementation and the analysis of the corresponding learning algorithms. We also discuss problems which might occur in practical applications.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


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Co-Clustering of Biological Networks and Gene Expression Data

Hanisch, D., Zien, A., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, (Suppl 1):145S-154S, 18, July 2002 (article)

Abstract
Motivation: Large scale gene expression data are often analysed by clustering genes based on gene expression data alone, though a priori knowledge in the form of biological networks is available. The use of this additional information promises to improve exploratory analysis considerably. Results: We propose constructing a distance function which combines information from expression data and biological networks. Based on this function, we compute a joint clustering of genes and vertices of the network. This general approach is elaborated for metabolic networks. We define a graph distance function on such networks and combine it with a correlation-based distance function for gene expression measurements. A hierarchical clustering and an associated statistical measure is computed to arrive at a reasonable number of clusters. Our method is validated using expression data of the yeast diauxic shift. The resulting clusters are easily interpretable in terms of the biochemical network and the gene expression data and suggest that our method is able to automatically identify processes that are relevant under the measured conditions.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


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Confidence measures for protein fold recognition

Sommer, I., Zien, A., von Ohsen, N., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

Bioinformatics, 18(6):802-812, June 2002 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Decision Boundary Pattern Selection for Support Vector Machines

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Data Mining Conference, pages: 33-41, Korean Data Mining Conference, May 2002 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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The contributions of color to recognition memory for natural scenes

Wichmann, F., Sharpe, L., Gegenfurtner, K.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition, 28(3):509-520, May 2002 (article)

Abstract
The authors used a recognition memory paradigm to assess the influence of color information on visual memory for images of natural scenes. Subjects performed 5-10% better for colored than for black-and-white images independent of exposure duration. Experiment 2 indicated little influence of contrast once the images were suprathreshold, and Experiment 3 revealed that performance worsened when images were presented in color and tested in black and white, or vice versa, leading to the conclusion that the surface property color is part of the memory representation. Experiments 4 and 5 exclude the possibility that the superior recognition memory for colored images results solely from attentional factors or saliency. Finally, the recognition memory advantage disappears for falsely colored images of natural scenes: The improvement in recognition memory depends on the color congruence of presented images with learned knowledge about the color gamut found within natural scenes. The results can be accounted for within a multiple memory systems framework.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]


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k-NN based Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Proc. of the Korean Industrial Engineers Conference, pages: 645-651, Korean Industrial Engineers Conference, May 2002 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Microarrays: How Many Do You Need?

Zien, A., Fluck, J., Zimmer, R., Lengauer, T.

In RECOMB 2002, pages: 321-330, ACM Press, New York, NY, USA, Sixth Annual International Conference on Research in Computational Molecular Biology, April 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We estimate the number of microarrays that is required in order to gain reliable results from a common type of study: the pairwise comparison of different classes of samples. Current knowlegde seems to suffice for the construction of models that are realistic with respect to searches for individual differentially expressed genes. Such models allow to investigate the dependence of the required number of samples on the relevant parameters: the biological variability of the samples within each class; the fold changes in expression; the detection sensitivity of the microarrays; and the acceptable error rates of the results. We supply experimentalists with general conclusions as well as a freely accessible Java applet at http://cartan.gmd.de/~zien/classsize/ for fine tuning simulations to their particular actualities. Since the situation can be assumed to be very similar for large scale proteomics and metabolomics studies, our methods and results might also apply there.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


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Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers

Shin, H., Cho, S.

In Ideal 2002, pages: 97-103, (Editors: Yin, H. , N. Allinson, R. Freeman, J. Keane, S. Hubbard), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Third International Conference on Intelligent Data Engineering and Automated Learning, January 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
SVMs tend to take a very long time to train with a large data set. If "redundant" patterns are identified and deleted in pre-processing, the training time could be reduced significantly. We propose a k-nearest neighbors(k-NN) based pattern selection method. The method tries to select the patterns that are near the decision boundary and that are correctly labeled. The simulations over synthetic data sets showed promising results: (1) By converting a non-separable problem to a separable one, the search for an optimal error tolerance parameter became unnecessary. (2) SVM training time decreased by two orders of magnitude without any loss of accuracy. (3) The redundant SVs were substantially reduced.

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]

PDF Web DOI [BibTex]