Header logo is ei


2005


no image
Motor Skill Learning for Humanoid Robots

Peters, J.

First Conference Undergraduate Computer Sciences and Informations Sciences (CS/IS), May 2005 (talk)

[BibTex]

2005

[BibTex]


no image
Bayesian inference for psychometric functions

Kuss, M., Jäkel, F., Wichmann, F.

Journal of Vision, 5(5):478-492, May 2005 (article)

Abstract
In psychophysical studies, the psychometric function is used to model the relation between physical stimulus intensity and the observer’s ability to detect or discriminate between stimuli of different intensities. In this study, we propose the use of Bayesian inference to extract the information contained in experimental data to estimate the parameters of psychometric functions. Because Bayesian inference cannot be performed analytically, we describe how a Markov chain Monte Carlo method can be used to generate samples from the posterior distribution over parameters. These samples are used to estimate Bayesian confidence intervals and other characteristics of the posterior distribution. In addition, we discuss the parameterization of psychometric functions and the role of prior distributions in the analysis. The proposed approach is exemplified using artificially generated data and in a case study for real experimental data. Furthermore, we compare our approach with traditional methods based on maximum likelihood parameter estimation combined with bootstrap techniques for confidence interval estimation and find the Bayesian approach to be superior.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
To apply score function difference based ICA algorithms to high-dimensional data

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

In Proceedings of the 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN 2005), pages: 291-297, 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN), April 2005 (inproceedings)

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
A gene expression map of Arabidopsis thaliana development

Schmid, M., Davison, T., Henz, S., Pape, U., Demar, M., Vingron, M., Schölkopf, B., Weigel, D., Lohmann, J.

Nature Genetics, 37(5):501-506, April 2005 (article)

Abstract
Regulatory regions of plant genes tend to be more compact than those of animal genes, but the complement of transcription factors encoded in plant genomes is as large or larger than that found in those of animals. Plants therefore provide an opportunity to study how transcriptional programs control multicellular development. We analyzed global gene expression during development of the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana in samples covering many stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, and diverse organs. Here, we provide a first analysis of this data set, which is part of the AtGenExpress expression atlas. We observed that the expression levels of transcription factor genes and signal transduction components are similar to those of metabolic genes. Examining the expression patterns of large gene families, we found that they are often more similar than would be expected by chance, indicating that many gene families have been co-opted for specific developmental processes.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Joint Regularization

Borgwardt, KM., Guttman, O., Vishwanathan, SVN., Smola, AJ.

In pages: 455-460, (Editors: Verleysen, M.), d-side, Evere, Belgium, 13th European Symposium on Artificial Neural Networks (ESANN), April 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a principled method to combine kernels under joint regularization constraints. Central to our method is an extension of the representer theorem for handling multiple joint regularization constraints. Experimental evidence shows the feasibility of our approach.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Morphological characterization of molecular complexes present in the synaptic cleft

Lucic, V., Yang, T., Schweikert, G., Förster, F., Baumeister, W.

Structure, 13(3):423-434, March 2005 (article)

Abstract
We obtained tomograms of isolated mammalian excitatory synapses by cryo-electron tomography. This method allows the investigation of biological material in the frozen-hydrated state, without staining, and can therefore provide reliable structural information at the molecular level. We developed an automated procedure for the segmentation of molecular complexes present in the synaptic cleft based on thresholding and connectivity, and calculated several morphological characteristics of these complexes. Extensive lateral connections along the synaptic cleft are shown to form a highly connected structure with a complex topology. Our results are essentially parameter-free, i.e., they do not depend on the choice of certain parameter values (such as threshold). In addition, the results are not sensitive to noise; the same conclusions can be drawn from the analysis of both nondenoised and denoised tomograms.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
EEG Source Localization for Brain-Computer-Interfaces

Grosse-Wentrup, M.

In 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, pages: 128-131, IEEE, 2nd International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, March 2005 (inproceedings)

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Experimentally optimal v in support vector regression for different noise models and parameter settings

Chalimourda, A., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

Neural Networks, 18(2):205-205, March 2005 (article)

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Efficient Pattern Selection for Support Vector Classifiers and its CRM Application

Shin, H.

Biologische Kybernetik, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, February 2005 (phdthesis)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Active Learning for Parzen Window Classifier

Chapelle, O.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 49-56, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The problem of active learning is approached in this paper by minimizing directly an estimate of the expected test error. The main difficulty in this ``optimal'' strategy is that output probabilities need to be estimated accurately. We suggest here different methods for estimating those efficiently. In this context, the Parzen window classifier is considered because it is both simple and probabilistic. The analysis of experimental results highlights that regularization is a key ingredient for this strategy.

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Semi-Supervised Classification by Low Density Separation

Chapelle, O., Zien, A.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 57-64, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We believe that the cluster assumption is key to successful semi-supervised learning. Based on this, we propose three semi-supervised algorithms: 1. deriving graph-based distances that emphazise low density regions between clusters, followed by training a standard SVM; 2. optimizing the Transductive SVM objective function, which places the decision boundary in low density regions, by gradient descent; 3. combining the first two to make maximum use of the cluster assumption. We compare with state of the art algorithms and demonstrate superior accuracy for the latter two methods.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Automatic In Situ Identification of Plankton

Blaschko, MB., Holness, G., Mattar, MA., Lisin, D., Utgoff, PE., Hanson, AR., Schultz, H., Riseman, EM., Sieracki, ME., Balch, WM., Tupper, B.

In WACV, pages: 79 , WACV, January 2005 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Kernel Constrained Covariance for Dependence Measurement

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Herbrich, R., Belitski, A., Augath, M., Murayama, Y., Pauls, J., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

In Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics, pages: 112-119, (Editors: R Cowell, R and Z Ghahramani), AISTATS, January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We discuss reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS)-based measures of statistical dependence, with emphasis on constrained covariance (COCO), a novel criterion to test dependence of random variables. We show that COCO is a test for independence if and only if the associated RKHSs are universal. That said, no independence test exists that can distinguish dependent and independent random variables in all circumstances. Dependent random variables can result in a COCO which is arbitrarily close to zero when the source densities are highly non-smooth. All current kernel-based independence tests share this behaviour. We demonstrate exponential convergence between the population and empirical COCO. Finally, we use COCO as a measure of joint neural activity between voxels in MRI recordings of the macaque monkey, and compare the results to the mutual information and the correlation. We also show the effect of removing breathing artefacts from the MRI recording.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Hilbertian Metrics and Positive Definite Kernels on Probability Measures

Hein, M., Bousquet, O.

In AISTATS 2005, pages: 136-143, (Editors: Cowell, R. , Z. Ghahramani), Tenth International Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AI & Statistics), January 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We investigate the problem of defining Hilbertian metrics resp. positive definite kernels on probability measures, continuing previous work. This type of kernels has shown very good results in text classification and has a wide range of possible applications. In this paper we extend the two-parameter family of Hilbertian metrics of Topsoe such that it now includes all commonly used Hilbertian metrics on probability measures. This allows us to do model selection among these metrics in an elegant and unified way. Second we investigate further our approach to incorporate similarity information of the probability space into the kernel. The analysis provides a better understanding of these kernels and gives in some cases a more efficient way to compute them. Finally we compare all proposed kernels in two text and two image classification problems.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel Constrained Covariance for Dependence Measurement

Gretton, A., Smola, A., Bousquet, O., Herbrich, R., Belitski, A., Augath, M., Murayama, Y., Schölkopf, B., Logothetis, N.

AISTATS, January 2005 (talk)

Abstract
We discuss reproducing kernel Hilbert space (RKHS)-based measures of statistical dependence, with emphasis on constrained covariance (COCO), a novel criterion to test dependence of random variables. We show that COCO is a test for independence if and only if the associated RKHSs are universal. That said, no independence test exists that can distinguish dependent and independent random variables in all circumstances. Dependent random variables can result in a COCO which is arbitrarily close to zero when the source densities are highly non-smooth. All current kernel-based independence tests share this behaviour. We demonstrate exponential convergence between the population and empirical COCO. Finally, we use COCO as a measure of joint neural activity between voxels in MRI recordings of the macaque monkey, and compare the results to the mutual information and the correlation. We also show the effect of removing breathing artefacts from the MRI recording.

PostScript [BibTex]

PostScript [BibTex]


no image
Semi-supervised protein classification using cluster kernels

Weston, J., Leslie, C., Ie, E., Zhou, D., Elisseeff, A., Noble, W.

Bioinformatics, 21(15):3241-3247, 2005 (article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Kernels: Regularization and Optimization

Ong, CS.

Biologische Kybernetik, The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, 2005 (phdthesis)

PDF GZIP [BibTex]

PDF GZIP [BibTex]


no image
Invariance of Neighborhood Relation under Input Space to Feature Space Mapping

Shin, H., Cho, S.

Pattern Recognition Letters, 26(6):707-718, 2005 (article)

Abstract
If the training pattern set is large, it takes a large memory and a long time to train support vector machine (SVM). Recently, we proposed neighborhood property based pattern selection algorithm (NPPS) which selects only the patterns that are likely to be near the decision boundary ahead of SVM training [Proc. of the 7th Pacific-Asia Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (PAKDD), Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence (LNAI 2637), Seoul, Korea, pp. 376–387]. NPPS tries to identify those patterns that are likely to become support vectors in feature space. Preliminary reports show its effectiveness: SVM training time was reduced by two orders of magnitude with almost no loss in accuracy for various datasets. It has to be noted, however, that decision boundary of SVM and support vectors are all defined in feature space while NPPS described above operates in input space. If neighborhood relation in input space is not preserved in feature space, NPPS may not always be effective. In this paper, we sh ow that the neighborhood relation is invariant under input to feature space mapping. The result assures that the patterns selected by NPPS in input space are likely to be located near decision boundary in feature space.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Intrinsic Dimensionality Estimation of Submanifolds in Euclidean space

Hein, M., Audibert, Y.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 289 , (Editors: De Raedt, L. , S. Wrobel), ICML Bonn, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a new method to estimate the intrinsic dimensionality of a submanifold M in Euclidean space from random samples. The method is based on the convergence rates of a certain U-statistic on the manifold. We solve at least partially the question of the choice of the scale of the data. Moreover the proposed method is easy to implement, can handle large data sets and performs very well even for small sample sizes. We compare the proposed method to two standard estimators on several artificial as well as real data sets.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Large Scale Genomic Sequence SVM Classifiers

Sonnenburg, S., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 849-856, (Editors: L De Raedt and S Wrobel), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In genomic sequence analysis tasks like splice site recognition or promoter identification, large amounts of training sequences are available, and indeed needed to achieve sufficiently high classification performances. In this work we study two recently proposed and successfully used kernels, namely the Spectrum kernel and the Weighted Degree kernel (WD). In particular, we suggest several extensions using Suffix Trees and modi cations of an SMO-like SVM training algorithm in order to accelerate the training of the SVMs and their evaluation on test sequences. Our simulations show that for the spectrum kernel and WD kernel, large scale SVM training can be accelerated by factors of 20 and 4 times, respectively, while using much less memory (e.g. no kernel caching). The evaluation on new sequences is often several thousand times faster using the new techniques (depending on the number of Support Vectors). Our method allows us to train on sets as large as one million sequences.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Joint Kernel Maps

Weston, J., Schölkopf, B., Bousquet, O.

In Proceedings of the 8th InternationalWork-Conference on Artificial Neural Networks, LNCS 3512, pages: 176-191, (Editors: J Cabestany and A Prieto and F Sandoval), Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, Germany, IWANN, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We develop a methodology for solving high dimensional dependency estimation problems between pairs of data types, which is viable in the case where the output of interest has very high dimension, e.g., thousands of dimensions. This is achieved by mapping the objects into continuous or discrete spaces, using joint kernels. Known correlations between input and output can be defined by such kernels, some of which can maintain linearity in the outputs to provide simple (closed form) pre-images. We provide examples of such kernels and empirical results.

PostScript DOI [BibTex]

PostScript DOI [BibTex]


no image
Analysis of Some Methods for Reduced Rank Gaussian Process Regression

Quinonero Candela, J., Rasmussen, C.

In Switching and Learning in Feedback Systems, pages: 98-127, (Editors: Murray Smith, R. , R. Shorten), Springer, Berlin, Germany, European Summer School on Multi-Agent Control, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
While there is strong motivation for using Gaussian Processes (GPs) due to their excellent performance in regression and classification problems, their computational complexity makes them impractical when the size of the training set exceeds a few thousand cases. This has motivated the recent proliferation of a number of cost-effective approximations to GPs, both for classification and for regression. In this paper we analyze one popular approximation to GPs for regression: the reduced rank approximation. While generally GPs are equivalent to infinite linear models, we show that Reduced Rank Gaussian Processes (RRGPs) are equivalent to finite sparse linear models. We also introduce the concept of degenerate GPs and show that they correspond to inappropriate priors. We show how to modify the RRGP to prevent it from being degenerate at test time. Training RRGPs consists both in learning the covariance function hyperparameters and the support set. We propose a method for learning hyperparameters for a given support set. We also review the Sparse Greedy GP (SGGP) approximation (Smola and Bartlett, 2001), which is a way of learning the support set for given hyperparameters based on approximating the posterior. We propose an alternative method to the SGGP that has better generalization capabilities. Finally we make experiments to compare the different ways of training a RRGP. We provide some Matlab code for learning RRGPs.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Graph Kernels for Chemical Informatics

Ralaivola, L., Swamidass, J., Saigo, H., Baldi, P.

Neural Networks, 18(8):1093-1110, 2005 (article)

Abstract
Increased availability of large repositories of chemical compounds is creating new challenges and opportunities for the application of machine learning methods to problems in computational chemistry and chemical informatics. Because chemical compounds are often represented by the graph of their covalent bonds, machine learning methods in this domain must be capable of processing graphical structures with variable size. Here we first briefly review the literature on graph kernels and then introduce three new kernels (Tanimoto, MinMax, Hybrid) based on the idea of molecular fingerprints and counting labeled paths of depth up to d using depthfirst search from each possible vertex. The kernels are applied to three classification problems to predict mutagenicity, toxicity, and anti-cancer activity on three publicly available data sets. The kernels achieve performances at least comparable, and most often superior, to those previously reported in the literature reaching accuracies of 91.5% on the Mutag dataset, 65-67% on the PTC (Predictive Toxicology Challenge) dataset, and 72% on the NCI (National Cancer Institute) dataset. Properties and tradeoffs of these kernels, as well as other proposed kernels that leverage 1D or 3D representations of molecules, are briefly discussed.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Extended Gaussianization Method for Blind Separation of Post-Nonlinear Mixtures

Zhang, K., Chan, L.

Neural Computation, 17(2):425-452, 2005 (article)

Abstract
The linear mixture model has been investigated in most articles tackling the problem of blind source separation. Recently, several articles have addressed a more complex model: blind source separation (BSS) of post-nonlinear (PNL) mixtures. These mixtures are assumed to be generated by applying an unknown invertible nonlinear distortion to linear instantaneous mixtures of some independent sources. The gaussianization technique for BSS of PNL mixtures emerged based on the assumption that the distribution of the linear mixture of independent sources is gaussian. In this letter, we review the gaussianization method and then extend it to apply to PNL mixture in which the linear mixture is close to gaussian. Our proposed method approximates the linear mixture using the Cornish-Fisher expansion. We choose the mutual information as the independence measurement to develop a learning algorithm to separate PNL mixtures. This method provides better applicability and accuracy. We then discuss the sufficient condition for the method to be valid. The characteristics of the nonlinearity do not affect the performance of this method. With only a few parameters to tune, our algorithm has a comparatively low computation. Finally, we present experiments to illustrate the efficiency of our method.

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Theory of Classification: A Survey of Some Recent Advances

Boucheron, S., Bousquet, O., Lugosi, G.

ESAIM: Probability and Statistics, 9, pages: 323 , 2005 (article)

Abstract
The last few years have witnessed important new developments in the theory and practice of pattern classification. We intend to survey some of the main new ideas that have lead to these important recent developments.

PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
From Graphs to Manifolds - Weak and Strong Pointwise Consistency of Graph Laplacians

Hein, M., Audibert, J., von Luxburg, U.

In Proceedings of the 18th Conference on Learning Theory (COLT), pages: 470-485, Conference on Learning Theory, 2005, Student Paper Award (inproceedings)

Abstract
In the machine learning community it is generally believed that graph Laplacians corresponding to a finite sample of data points converge to a continuous Laplace operator if the sample size increases. Even though this assertion serves as a justification for many Laplacian-based algorithms, so far only some aspects of this claim have been rigorously proved. In this paper we close this gap by establishing the strong pointwise consistency of a family of graph Laplacians with data-dependent weights to some weighted Laplace operator. Our investigation also includes the important case where the data lies on a submanifold of $R^d$.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Propagating Distributions on a Hypergraph by Dual Information Regularization

Tsuda, K.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 921 , (Editors: De Raedt, L. , S. Wrobel), ICML Bonn, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In the information regularization framework by Corduneanu and Jaakkola (2005), the distributions of labels are propagated on a hypergraph for semi-supervised learning. The learning is efficiently done by a Blahut-Arimoto-like two step algorithm, but, unfortunately, one of the steps cannot be solved in a closed form. In this paper, we propose a dual version of information regularization, which is considered as more natural in terms of information geometry. Our learning algorithm has two steps, each of which can be solved in a closed form. Also it can be naturally applied to exponential family distributions such as Gaussians. In experiments, our algorithm is applied to protein classification based on a metabolic network and known functional categories.

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


no image
Moment Inequalities for Functions of Independent Random Variables

Boucheron, S., Bousquet, O., Lugosi, G., Massart, P.

To appear in Annals of Probability, 33, pages: 514-560, 2005 (article)

Abstract
A general method for obtaining moment inequalities for functions of independent random variables is presented. It is a generalization of the entropy method which has been used to derive concentration inequalities for such functions cite{BoLuMa01}, and is based on a generalized tensorization inequality due to Lata{l}a and Oleszkiewicz cite{LaOl00}. The new inequalities prove to be a versatile tool in a wide range of applications. We illustrate the power of the method by showing how it can be used to effortlessly re-derive classical inequalities including Rosenthal and Kahane-Khinchine-type inequalities for sums of independent random variables, moment inequalities for suprema of empirical processes, and moment inequalities for Rademacher chaos and $U$-statistics. Some of these corollaries are apparently new. In particular, we generalize Talagrands exponential inequality for Rademacher chaos of order two to any order. We also discuss applications for other complex functions of independent random variables, such as suprema of boolean polynomials which include, as special cases, subgraph counting problems in random graphs.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
A Brain Computer Interface with Online Feedback based on Magnetoencephalography

Lal, T., Schröder, M., Hill, J., Preissl, H., Hinterberger, T., Mellinger, J., Bogdan, M., Rosenstiel, W., Hofmann, T., Birbaumer, N., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 465-472, (Editors: L De Raedt and S Wrobel), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The aim of this paper is to show that machine learning techniques can be used to derive a classifying function for human brain signal data measured by magnetoencephalography (MEG), for the use in a brain computer interface (BCI). This is especially helpful for evaluating quickly whether a BCI approach based on electroencephalography, on which training may be slower due to lower signalto- noise ratio, is likely to succeed. We apply recursive channel elimination and regularized SVMs to the experimental data of ten healthy subjects performing a motor imagery task. Four subjects were able to use a trained classifier together with a decision tree interface to write a short name. Further analysis gives evidence that the proposed imagination task is suboptimal for the possible extension to a multiclass interface. To the best of our knowledge this paper is the first working online BCI based on MEG recordings and is therefore a “proof of concept”.

PDF PDF [BibTex]

PDF PDF [BibTex]


no image
Healing the Relevance Vector Machine through Augmentation

Rasmussen, CE., Candela, JQ.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 689 , (Editors: De Raedt, L. , S. Wrobel), ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) is a sparse approximate Bayesian kernel method. It provides full predictive distributions for test cases. However, the predictive uncertainties have the unintuitive property, that emph{they get smaller the further you move away from the training cases}. We give a thorough analysis. Inspired by the analogy to non-degenerate Gaussian Processes, we suggest augmentation to solve the problem. The purpose of the resulting model, RVM*, is primarily to corroborate the theoretical and experimental analysis. Although RVM* could be used in practical applications, it is no longer a truly sparse model. Experiments show that sparsity comes at the expense of worse predictive distributions.

PDF PostScript [BibTex]

PDF PostScript [BibTex]


no image
A novel representation of protein sequences for prediction of subcellular location using support vector machines

Matsuda, S., Vert, J., Saigo, H., Ueda, N., Toh, H., Akutsu, T.

Protein Science, 14, pages: 2804-2813, 2005 (article)

Abstract
As the number of complete genomes rapidly increases, accurate methods to automatically predict the subcellular location of proteins are increasingly useful to help their functional annotation. In order to improve the predictive accuracy of the many prediction methods developed to date, a novel representation of protein sequences is proposed. This representation involves local compositions of amino acids and twin amino acids, and local frequencies of distance between successive (basic, hydrophobic, and other) amino acids. For calculating the local features, each sequence is split into three parts: N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal. The N-terminal part is further divided into four regions to consider ambiguity in the length and position of signal sequences. We tested this representation with support vector machines on two data sets extracted from the SWISS-PROT database. Through fivefold cross-validation tests, overall accuracies of more than 87% and 91% were obtained for eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins, respectively. It is concluded that considering the respective features in the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal parts is helpful to predict the subcellular location. Keywords: subcellular location; signal sequence; amino acid composition; distance frequency; support vector machine; predictive accuracy

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Long Term Prediction of Product Quality in a Glass Manufacturing Process Using a Kernel Based Approach

Jung, T., Herrera, L., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 8th International Work-Conferenceon Artificial Neural Networks (Computational Intelligence and Bioinspired Systems), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 3512, LNCS 3512, pages: 960-967, (Editors: J Cabestany and A Prieto and F Sandoval), Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, Germany, IWANN, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In this paper we report the results obtained using a kernel-based approach to predict the temporal development of four response signals in the process control of a glass melting tank with 16 input parameters. The data set is a revised version1 from the modelling challenge in EUNITE-2003. The central difficulties are: large time-delays between changes in the inputs and the outputs, large number of data, and a general lack of knowledge about the relevant variables that intervene in the process. The methodology proposed here comprises Support Vector Machines (SVM) and Regularization Networks (RN). We use the idea of sparse approximation both as a means of regularization and as a means of reducing the computational complexity. Furthermore, we will use an incremental approach to add new training examples to the kernel-based method and efficiently update the current solution. This allows us to use a sophisticated learning scheme, where we iterate between prediction and training, with good computational efficiency and satisfactory results.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


no image
Object correspondence as a machine learning problem

Schölkopf, B., Steinke, F., Blanz, V.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 777-784, (Editors: L De Raedt and S Wrobel), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose machine learning methods for the estimation of deformation fields that transform two given objects into each other, thereby establishing a dense point to point correspondence. The fields are computed using a modified support vector machine containing a penalty enforcing that points of one object will be mapped to ``similar‘‘ points on the other one. Our system, which contains little engineering or domain knowledge, delivers state of the art performance. We present application results including close to photorealistic morphs of 3D head models.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
A tutorial on v-support vector machines

Chen, P., Lin, C., Schölkopf, B.

Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry, 21(2):111-136, 2005 (article)

Abstract
We briefly describe the main ideas of statistical learning theory, support vector machines (SVMs), and kernel feature spaces. We place particular emphasis on a description of the so-called -SVM, including details of the algorithm and its implementation, theoretical results, and practical applications. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Robust EEG Channel Selection Across Subjects for Brain Computer Interfaces

Schröder, M., Lal, T., Hinterberger, T., Bogdan, M., Hill, J., Birbaumer, N., Rosenstiel, W., Schölkopf, B.

EURASIP Journal on Applied Signal Processing, 2005(19, Special Issue: Trends in Brain Computer Interfaces):3103-3112, (Editors: Vesin, J. M., T. Ebrahimi), 2005 (article)

Abstract
Most EEG-based Brain Computer Interface (BCI) paradigms come along with specific electrode positions, e.g.~for a visual based BCI electrode positions close to the primary visual cortex are used. For new BCI paradigms it is usually not known where task relevant activity can be measured from the scalp. For individual subjects Lal et.~al showed that recording positions can be found without the use of prior knowledge about the paradigm used. However it remains unclear to what extend their method of Recursive Channel Elimination (RCE) can be generalized across subjects. In this paper we transfer channel rankings from a group of subjects to a new subject. For motor imagery tasks the results are promising, although cross-subject channel selection does not quite achieve the performance of channel selection on data of single subjects. Although the RCE method was not provided with prior knowledge about the mental task, channels that are well known to be important (from a physiological point of view) were consistently selected whereas task-irrelevant channels were reliably disregarded.

Web DOI [BibTex]

Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Implicit Surface Modelling as an Eigenvalue Problem

Walder, C., Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Machine Learning, pages: 937-944, (Editors: L De Raedt and S Wrobel), ACM, New York, NY, USA, ICML, 2005 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We discuss the problem of fitting an implicit shape model to a set of points sampled from a co-dimension one manifold of arbitrary topology. The method solves a non-convex optimisation problem in the embedding function that defines the implicit by way of its zero level set. By assuming that the solution is a mixture of radial basis functions of varying widths we attain the globally optimal solution by way of an equivalent eigenvalue problem, without using or constructing as an intermediate step the normal vectors of the manifold at each data point. We demonstrate the system on two and three dimensional data, with examples of missing data interpolation and set operations on the resultant shapes.

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Natural Actor-Critic

Peters, J., Vijayakumar, S., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 16th European Conference on Machine Learning, 3720, pages: 280-291, (Editors: Gama, J.;Camacho, R.;Brazdil, P.;Jorge, A.;Torgo, L.), Springer, ECML, 2005, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper investigates a novel model-free reinforcement learning architecture, the Natural Actor-Critic. The actor updates are based on stochastic policy gradients employing AmariÕs natural gradient approach, while the critic obtains both the natural policy gradient and additional parameters of a value function simultaneously by linear regres- sion. We show that actor improvements with natural policy gradients are particularly appealing as these are independent of coordinate frame of the chosen policy representation, and can be estimated more efficiently than regular policy gradients. The critic makes use of a special basis function parameterization motivated by the policy-gradient compatible function approximation. We show that several well-known reinforcement learning methods such as the original Actor-Critic and BradtkeÕs Linear Quadratic Q-Learning are in fact Natural Actor-Critic algorithms. Em- pirical evaluations illustrate the effectiveness of our techniques in com- parison to previous methods, and also demonstrate their applicability for learning control on an anthropomorphic robot arm.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


no image
Comparative experiments on task space control with redundancy resolution

Nakanishi, J., Cory, R., Mistry, M., Peters, J., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, pages: 3901-3908, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, Aug. 2-6, IROS, 2005, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
Understanding the principles of motor coordination with redundant degrees of freedom still remains a challenging problem, particularly for new research in highly redundant robots like humanoids. Even after more than a decade of research, task space control with redundacy resolution still remains an incompletely understood theoretical topic, and also lacks a larger body of thorough experimental investigation on complex robotic systems. This paper presents our first steps towards the development of a working redundancy resolution algorithm which is robust against modeling errors and unforeseen disturbances arising from contact forces. To gain a better understanding of the pros and cons of different approaches to redundancy resolution, we focus on a comparative empirical evaluation. First, we review several redundancy resolution schemes at the velocity, acceleration and torque levels presented in the literature in a common notational framework and also introduce some new variants of these previous approaches. Second, we present experimental comparisons of these approaches on a seven-degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robot arm. Surprisingly, one of our simplest algorithms empirically demonstrates the best performance, despite, from a theoretical point, the algorithm does not share the same beauty as some of the other methods. Finally, we discuss practical properties of these control algorithms, particularly in light of inevitable modeling errors of the robot dynamics.

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

2002


no image
Optimized Support Vector Machines for Nonstationary Signal Classification

Davy, M., Gretton, A., Doucet, A., Rayner, P.

IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(12):442-445, December 2002 (article)

Abstract
This letter describes an efficient method to perform nonstationary signal classification. A support vector machine (SVM) algorithm is introduced and its parameters optimised in a principled way. Simulations demonstrate that our low complexity method outperforms state-of-the-art nonstationary signal classification techniques.

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]

2002

PostScript Web DOI [BibTex]


no image
Gender Classification of Human Faces

Graf, A., Wichmann, F.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, pages: 1-18, (Editors: Bülthoff, H. H., S.W. Lee, T. A. Poggio and C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
This paper addresses the issue of combining pre-processing methods—dimensionality reduction using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Locally Linear Embedding (LLE)—with Support Vector Machine (SVM) classification for a behaviorally important task in humans: gender classification. A processed version of the MPI head database is used as stimulus set. First, summary statistics of the head database are studied. Subsequently the optimal parameters for LLE and the SVM are sought heuristically. These values are then used to compare the original face database with its processed counterpart and to assess the behavior of a SVM with respect to changes in illumination and perspective of the face images. Overall, PCA was superior in classification performance and allowed linear separability.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
Insect-Inspired Estimation of Self-Motion

Franz, MO., Chahl, JS.

In Biologically Motivated Computer Vision, (2525):171-180, LNCS, (Editors: Bülthoff, H.H. , S.W. Lee, T.A. Poggio, C. Wallraven), Springer, Berlin, Germany, Second International Workshop on Biologically Motivated Computer Vision (BMCV), November 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The tangential neurons in the fly brain are sensitive to the typical optic flow patterns generated during self-motion. In this study, we examine whether a simplified linear model of these neurons can be used to estimate self-motion from the optic flow. We present a theory for the construction of an optimal linear estimator incorporating prior knowledge about the environment. The optimal estimator is tested on a gantry carrying an omnidirectional vision sensor. The experiments show that the proposed approach leads to accurate and robust estimates of rotation rates, whereas translation estimates turn out to be less reliable.

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]

PDF PDF DOI [BibTex]


no image
A New Discriminative Kernel from Probabilistic Models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

Neural Computation, 14(10):2397-2414, October 2002 (article)

PDF [BibTex]

PDF [BibTex]


no image
Combining sensory Information to Improve Visualization

Ernst, M., Banks, M., Wichmann, F., Maloney, L., Bülthoff, H.

In Proceedings of the Conference on Visualization ‘02 (VIS ‘02), pages: 571-574, (Editors: Moorhead, R. , M. Joy), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, IEEE Conference on Visualization (VIS '02), October 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Seemingly effortlessly the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional environment surrounding us from the light pattern striking the eyes. This seems to be true across almost all viewing and lighting conditions. One important factor for this apparent easiness is the redundancy of information provided by the sensory organs. For example, perspective distortions, shading, motion parallax, or the disparity between the two eyes' images are all, at least partly, redundant signals which provide us with information about the three-dimensional layout of the visual scene. Our brain uses all these different sensory signals and combines the available information into a coherent percept. In displays visualizing data, however, the information is often highly reduced and abstracted, which may lead to an altered perception and therefore a misinterpretation of the visualized data. In this panel we will discuss mechanisms involved in the combination of sensory information and their implications for simulations using computer displays, as well as problems resulting from current display technology such as cathode-ray tubes.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Sampling Techniques for Kernel Methods

Achlioptas, D., McSherry, F., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in neural information processing systems 14 , pages: 335-342, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We propose randomized techniques for speeding up Kernel Principal Component Analysis on three levels: sampling and quantization of the Gram matrix in training, randomized rounding in evaluating the kernel expansions, and random projections in evaluating the kernel itself. In all three cases, we give sharp bounds on the accuracy of the obtained approximations.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
The Infinite Hidden Markov Model

Beal, MJ., Ghahramani, Z., Rasmussen, CE.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 577-584, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We show that it is possible to extend hidden Markov models to have a countably infinite number of hidden states. By using the theory of Dirichlet processes we can implicitly integrate out the infinitely many transition parameters, leaving only three hyperparameters which can be learned from data. These three hyperparameters define a hierarchical Dirichlet process capable of capturing a rich set of transition dynamics. The three hyperparameters control the time scale of the dynamics, the sparsity of the underlying state-transition matrix, and the expected number of distinct hidden states in a finite sequence. In this framework it is also natural to allow the alphabet of emitted symbols to be infinite - consider, for example, symbols being possible words appearing in English text.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
A new discriminative kernel from probabilistic models

Tsuda, K., Kawanabe, M., Rätsch, G., Sonnenburg, S., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 977-984, (Editors: Dietterich, T.G. , S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Recently, Jaakkola and Haussler proposed a method for constructing kernel functions from probabilistic models. Their so called \Fisher kernel" has been combined with discriminative classi ers such as SVM and applied successfully in e.g. DNA and protein analysis. Whereas the Fisher kernel (FK) is calculated from the marginal log-likelihood, we propose the TOP kernel derived from Tangent vectors Of Posterior log-odds. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical framework on feature extractors from probabilistic models and use it for analyzing the TOP kernel. In experiments our new discriminative TOP kernel compares favorably to the Fisher kernel.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Incorporating Invariances in Non-Linear Support Vector Machines

Chapelle, O., Schölkopf, B.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 609-616, (Editors: TG Dietterich and S Becker and Z Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, 15th Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The choice of an SVM kernel corresponds to the choice of a representation of the data in a feature space and, to improve performance, it should therefore incorporate prior knowledge such as known transformation invariances. We propose a technique which extends earlier work and aims at incorporating invariances in nonlinear kernels. We show on a digit recognition task that the proposed approach is superior to the Virtual Support Vector method, which previously had been the method of choice.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Functional Genomics of Osteoarthritis

Aigner, T., Bartnik, E., Zien, A., Zimmer, R.

Pharmacogenomics, 3(5):635-650, September 2002 (article)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]


no image
Kernel feature spaces and nonlinear blind source separation

Harmeling, S., Ziehe, A., Kawanabe, M., Müller, K.

In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 14, pages: 761-768, (Editors: Dietterich, T. G., S. Becker, Z. Ghahramani), MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, Fifteenth Annual Neural Information Processing Systems Conference (NIPS), September 2002 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In kernel based learning the data is mapped to a kernel feature space of a dimension that corresponds to the number of training data points. In practice, however, the data forms a smaller submanifold in feature space, a fact that has been used e.g. by reduced set techniques for SVMs. We propose a new mathematical construction that permits to adapt to the intrinsic dimension and to find an orthonormal basis of this submanifold. In doing so, computations get much simpler and more important our theoretical framework allows to derive elegant kernelized blind source separation (BSS) algorithms for arbitrary invertible nonlinear mixings. Experiments demonstrate the good performance and high computational efficiency of our kTDSEP algorithm for the problem of nonlinear BSS.

PDF Web [BibTex]

PDF Web [BibTex]


no image
Constructing Boosting algorithms from SVMs: an application to one-class classification.

Rätsch, G., Mika, S., Schölkopf, B., Müller, K.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24(9):1184-1199, September 2002 (article)

Abstract
We show via an equivalence of mathematical programs that a support vector (SV) algorithm can be translated into an equivalent boosting-like algorithm and vice versa. We exemplify this translation procedure for a new algorithm—one-class leveraging—starting from the one-class support vector machine (1-SVM). This is a first step toward unsupervised learning in a boosting framework. Building on so-called barrier methods known from the theory of constrained optimization, it returns a function, written as a convex combination of base hypotheses, that characterizes whether a given test point is likely to have been generated from the distribution underlying the training data. Simulations on one-class classification problems demonstrate the usefulness of our approach.

DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]