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2001


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Unsupervised Sequence Segmentation by a Mixture of Switching Variable Memory Markov Sources

Seldin, Y., Bejerano, G., Tishby, N.

In In the proceeding of the 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML 2001), pages: 513-520, 18th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), 2001 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a novel information theoretic algorithm for unsupervised segmentation of sequences into alternating Variable Memory Markov sources. The algorithm is based on competitive learning between Markov models, when implemented as Prediction Suffix Trees (Ron et al., 1996) using the MDL principle. By applying a model clustering procedure, based on rate distortion theory combined with deterministic annealing, we obtain a hierarchical segmentation of sequences between alternating Markov sources. The algorithm seems to be self regulated and automatically avoids over segmentation. The method is applied successfully to unsupervised segmentation of multilingual texts into languages where it is able to infer correctly both the number of languages and the language switching points. When applied to protein sequence families, we demonstrate the method‘s ability to identify biologically meaningful sub-sequences within the proteins, which correspond to important functional sub-units called domains.

PDF [BibTex]

2001

PDF [BibTex]


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Inference Principles and Model Selection

Buhmann, J., Schölkopf, B.

(01301), Dagstuhl Seminar, 2001 (techreport)

Web [BibTex]

Web [BibTex]

2000


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Advances in Large Margin Classifiers

Smola, A., Bartlett, P., Schölkopf, B., Schuurmans, D.

pages: 422, Neural Information Processing, MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, USA, October 2000 (book)

Abstract
The concept of large margins is a unifying principle for the analysis of many different approaches to the classification of data from examples, including boosting, mathematical programming, neural networks, and support vector machines. The fact that it is the margin, or confidence level, of a classification--that is, a scale parameter--rather than a raw training error that matters has become a key tool for dealing with classifiers. This book shows how this idea applies to both the theoretical analysis and the design of algorithms. The book provides an overview of recent developments in large margin classifiers, examines connections with other methods (e.g., Bayesian inference), and identifies strengths and weaknesses of the method, as well as directions for future research. Among the contributors are Manfred Opper, Vladimir Vapnik, and Grace Wahba.

Web [BibTex]

2000

Web [BibTex]


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An Introduction to Kernel-Based Learning Algorithms

Müller, K., Mika, S., Rätsch, G., Tsuda, K., Schölkopf, B.

In Handbook of Neural Network Signal Processing, 4, (Editors: Yu Hen Hu and Jang-Neng Hwang), CRC Press, 2000 (inbook)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Choosing nu in support vector regression with different noise models — theory and experiments

Chalimourda, A., Schölkopf, B., Smola, A.

In Proceedings of the IEEE-INNS-ENNS International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, IJCNN 2000, Neural Computing: New Challenges and Perspectives for the New Millennium, IEEE, International Joint Conference on Neural Networks, 2000 (inproceedings)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]